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Courses Offered in Sociology

Sociology

SOC 110: Introduction to Sociology

This course focuses on human interactions and world cultures through the study of social customs and social institutions. The classroom approach combines theory and research methods to provide an empirically-oriented foundation for the study of sociology. This course will consider the linkages among the individual, social groups, and social institutions, with a focus on issues such as race, class and gender. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society, World Cultures

SOC 110H: Introduction to Sociology-honors

This course focuses on human interactions and world cultures through the study of social customs and social institutions, The classroom approach combines theory and research methods to provide an empirically-oriented foundation for the study of sociology. This course will consider the linkages among the individual, social groups, and social institutions, with a focus on issues such as race, class and gender. Students will explore issues in contemporary societies through the use of primary source material. Three lecture hours per week. Open only to students in the Honors Program and Sociology majors with a 3.0 grade point average.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society, World Cultures

SOC 150: Introduction to Anthropology

Examines principles of physical and cultural anthropology: origins, evolution and diversity of people and culture. Includes cross-cultural analyses of social institutions (family, government, economics), gender roles, race, language, religion and stratification. Three lecture hours per week. Required for all Sociology majors.
Prerequisite: SOC110 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 201: Introduction to Sociology

The student considers human beings and their cultures as revealed in their customs and institutions. The classroom approach combines theory and research with current literature to provide a concrete, reality-oriented foundation for the study of sociology. The course will consider social problems, including racism and sexism in America and other societies, to enable the student to see practical applications of sociological principles.. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society, World Cultures

SOC 206: Statistics for the Social Sciences

This course is designed to introduce students to the use of statistical analyses in social and behavioral sciences. The basic goal is to help students understand, apply, and interpret basic social statistics. This class will introduce students to the most common methods of summarizing and presenting data (descriptive statistics). Students also will learn how to make estimates about a population based on a sample (inferential statistics). Using both manual calculations and computer-based exercises and manipulation of datasets, students will learn the fundamental techniques of statistical analysis. Three lecture hours per week and laboratory work outside of class.
Prerequisites: MAT108 or a higher-level math course, or permission of department chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Quantitative Reasoning

SOC 210: Social Thought I: Established Thought

This course considers the broad spectrum of thought and ideas directed through history toward the nature of society and humanity's place within the social framework. The course primarily examines historical and contemporary examples of accepted or "establishment" thought as expressed by a variety of social philosophers as well as sociologists. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 211: Social Thought Ii: Rebel Thought

This course examines the nature of society and the place humanity holds within it from both an historical and contemporary standpoint. The course is concerned primarily with an examination of varieties of thought contrary to, or directed against, the accepted social views of the times in which they arise. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 217: Gender and Society

This course will identify the assumptions and presuppositions we make about gender in society, identify their sources, and consider the impact they have on individuals, groups and social institutions. We will discern how societies produce gender, the distinction between sex and gender, and the social impact of gender stereotypes. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 220: Introduction to the Sociology of Children

This course provides an overview of main issues in the Sociology of Children. Students will learn how sociological concepts such as roles, status, norms, socialization, institutions, power socialization, research methodology, and theoretical analysis apply to the study of children. They will also gain an understanding of the current state of children organizations, policies, funding, and practices. Analysis of both macro and micro issues will be included. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 232: Marriage, Family, and Intimate Relationships

Analysis of the American family as a social institution. Historical development, adaptation to values and goals of societal and cultural milieu, effects of social change. Three lecture hours per week. Requirement for B.S. Sociology, Gerontology option.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 233: Peoples of India

This course examines the nature and diversity of the people inhabiting the Indian subcontinent. Topics such as the Hindu-Muslim dichotomy and the British occupation are explored within the context of the historical development of India's population. Emphasis is given to the influence of contemporary religious and social and political events upon the nation's unique demographic composition. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 238: Peoples of Africa I

An introduction of the socio-cultural context of present-day Africa with emphasis on ethnicity (tribalism). The interaction of the various African forces with the Western colonialist powers is investigated. The role and contribution of the various liberation movements - ANC, FRELIMO, SAPO, PALGC, ZAPU, MPLA - to African independence are also assessed. The intent is to project an objective picture of the peoples of Africa. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 240: Contemporary Social Problems

This course examines the social conditions that contribute to social problems from a critical and comparative global perspective. Students will develop an understanding of how social problems are constructed, their core causes across and within different regions and countries, and how specific problems can be mitigated from both a social structural and an individual perspective. Sociological theories and paradigms will be applied in a critical and comparative in-depth analysis of a broad series of social problems, which may include globalization, poverty, discrimination, crime, health, environment issues, war and terrorism. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society, World Cultures

SOC 242: Principles of Criminology

The development of theories of criminality; extent and typology of crime in the United States. Changing attitudes toward the criminal and their effects upon the field of corrections; the effects of social change upon the climate of violence in society. Three lecture hours per week. Open only to Juniors and Seniors.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 246: Social Deviance

Examination and analysis of advanced theory on the social process by which behavior becomes defined as deviant. Particular attention is given to the normative system as it applies to culture and problematic areas within the system. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites: SOC201 and Junior standing, or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 250: Public Sociology

This course will introduce students to the core concepts, assumptions, and strategies employed by public sociologists. Although the discipline of sociology has maintained a longtime commitment to social justice and equity, there has been considerable debate in the field about how to achieve these ends. Some sociologists argue that producing high quality social science research is sufficient to meet this commitment. Others, including public sociologists, both encourage and engage in more direct community engagement and activism. These activities sometimes take the shape of formal and informal educational activities, community engaged research efforts, accessible writing across multiple genres, and community organizing activities. This course will explore the history of community and activist engagement among sociologists and will provide multiple examples of contemporary public sociology efforts, including but not limited to films, photography, performances, digital writing, and community-oriented policy work. Through both informal and formal writing assignments, students will have an opportunity to reflect on the practice of public sociology and learn how to communicate social science research to various publics. This course fulfills the WII core requirement for non-sociology majors. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites: SOC110 or SOC201 or permission of Department Chairperson, and Level I writing (W-I).

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level II

SOC 300: Social Thought I: Established Thought

This course considers the broad spectrum of thought and ideas directed through history toward the nature of society and humanity's place within the social framework. The course primarily examines historical and contemporary examples of accepted or "establishment" thought as expressed by a variety of social philosophers as well as sociologists. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 305: The Black Family in the U.s.

Course centers on the career of the Black family in the United States. Emphasis is on Black child care, self-concept, and acquisition of mechanisms that will insure the survival and well being of the Black person in a hostile environment. The role of the Black woman as the traditional pillar of the Black community constitutes the main focus of the course. Three lecture hours per week. Offered in alternate years. Recommended for Women's Studies Minor.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 306: The Black Woman

The course explores the socio-economic institutions which have helped shape the situation of the Black woman in the United States and considers the importance of class, race and gender in this process. Because of the relationship of the Black woman to the Black family and Black community, any discussion of the Black woman is incomplete without addressing these two institutions. Emphasis will also be put on the Black woman in Africa and the Caribbean. Three lecture hours per week. Offered in alternate years.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 310: Education and Society

This course examines the functions and structures of the varying forms of educational processes in contemporary society. Emphasis is given to the development and direction of informal and institutionalized education in America, the differing patterns of education, which have evolved within other societies and cultures, and the links between education and social order. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 313: Sociology of Aging

Study of major sociological, psychological, and physiological processes of aging. Analysis includes overall view of aging theories and review of research and empirical studies relating to each. Implications for the future in terms of employment, welfare, retirement and political power. Three lecture hours per week. Requirement for B.S. Sociology, Gerontology option.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 314: On Death and Dying

Many of society's more traditional institutions are becoming aware of their difficulty in handling human death. This course attempts to review some of these institutions, such as the hospital, the church, the funeral home, and the family. The objective of this course is to acquire a deeper understanding of the inseparable relationship existing between styles of living and the fact of dying. The way we live life and the way society establishes values provide clear insight into the quality of understanding death. Three lecture hours per week. Requirement for B.S. Sociology, Gerontology option.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 316: Religion and Society

This course studies religion from a sociological perspective and deals with the role of the sacred in society and in the lives of individuals. Topics include myth and belief, conversion, organization and leadership; primitive and non-Western religion; and contemporary issues such as church and state, religious fundamentalism, cults, Black and Hispanic churches, social justice advocacy, etc. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: SOC110 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 318: Women, Globalization, and Development

This course examines women and social change in different social, cultural, economic and political systems of the world to develop an understanding of the status of women in different cultural contexts and how women's statuses have changed over time. In the last half of the twentieth century, globalization has greatly transformed the social organization of many societies. Women in the Global South such as parts of Asia (except Japan), Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, and the Middle East have been impacted by these global social forces and should be studied as part of an interdependent world. The role of the United Nations' Commission on the status of Women (CSW) in advocating for gender equality throughout the world also will be studied. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: SOC 201.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level II, World Cultures

SOC 320: Violence and Children

This course will explore macro and micro forms of abuse and violence as they pertain to children. Children have long been the recipients of a variety of forms of abuse and violence. This course will review the history of child abuse, including physical, sexual, emotional, verbal abuse. Contemporary forms of violence to be explored include domestic violence, social violence, bullying, gangs, terrorism, war, and the routine socialization of children for violence. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or SOC220 or permission of the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 330: Introduction to Anthropology

Examines principles of physical and cultural anthropology: origins, evolution and diversity of people and culture. Includes cross-cultural analyses of social institutions (family, government, economics), gender roles, race, language, religion and stratification. Three lecture hours per week. Required for all Sociology majors.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 332: Sociology of the American Family

Analysis of the American family as a social institution. Historical development, adaptation to values and goals of societal and cultural milieu, effects of social change. Three lecture hours per week. Requirement for B.S. Sociology, Gerontology option.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 333: Peoples of India

This course examines the nature and diversity of the people inhabiting the Indian subcontinent. Topics such as the Hindu-Muslim dichotomy and the British occupation are explored within the context of the historical development of India's population. Emphasis is given to the influence of contemporary religious and social and political events upon the nation's unique demographic composition. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 335: Peoples and Cultures of the Caribbean

Analysis of the present socio-economic structures of the Caribbean countries, with emphasis upon the historical processes that account for their chronic state of underdevelopment. An in-depth study of the major nations of the area is attempted in an effort to arrive at a Caribbean ideal type. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 336: Afro-latinos: Race, Culture and Trans-nationalism

This course will provide a local and global understanding of Latinos living in the United States with a specific focus on Afro-Latino groups. Afro-Latinos represent a portion of the significant growth of the US Latino population in the latter half of the 20th century and have a unique experience within the Latino population as they straddle racial lines in the US as both Black and Latino. This course focuses on how issues such as immigration, racism, language, media and popular culture, history US and European colonization and imperialism, gender, and and sexuality shape the cultural and social experiences of Afro-Latino groups from the Caribbean, Central America, South America and the United States. Investigating these experiences will provide a clear understanding of what brings Afro-Latinos to the US and to specific locations once they have arrived and settled here. Three lecture hours per week.

Prerequisite: SOC201 or permission of the department chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 340: Social Problems in the U.s.

This course examines the social conditions that contribute to social problems from a critical and global perspective focusing on how social problems are constructed and defined, and an identification of both structural solutions and individual actions needed to resolve them. Students will develop an understanding of how social problems are constructed, their core causes and how they could be mitigated from both a structural and an individual perspective. Sociological theories and paradigms will be applied in a critical and in-depth analysis of a broad series of global social problems, which may include: globalization, poverty, hunger, discrimination based on race, ethnicity, gender, age or sexual orientation, crime, substance abuse, environmental problems, and war and terrorism. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society, World Cultures

SOC 341: Urban Sociology

Historical and social development of the city in the U.S. (central city, suburbia, metropolitan area) together with international comparisons. Urban issues such as race, class, politics, poverty, crime, housing, transportation, etc. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 343: Juvenile Delinquency

An analysis of the social, psychological, legal approaches to causation, prevention, treatment, and control of crimes committed by minors. Special emphasis is given to juvenile delinquency as related to socio-economic status. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 345: Race and Ethnicity in Society

This course examines the ways race and ethnicity matter in society and the consequences of this for people's lives. Racial and ethnic conflicts have played, and continue to play a central role in American life. Even as overt racial conflicts have diminished, racial inequalities persist, and at times have widened. We will examine why this continues to happen and what can be done to reduce racial inequalities.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 347: Social Inequality: Race, Class and Gender

This course provides an introduction to the study of social inequality. An analysis of the structure and dynamics of social inequality, focusing upon competing theoretical explorations and empirical investigation of different arrangements by which wealth, power, and prestige are distributed in human societies. We will examine the process of inter-generational mobility , explore the influence of contextual or structural factors on the process of mobility, assess differences by race and gender in the process of mobility, and compare the level of mobility experienced in the U.S. to other countries. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society

SOC 348: Hispanic Groups in the U.s.

The culture, social structure and institutions of the major groups of Hispanic origin currently found in the U.S. (Puerto Ricans, Cuban-Americans, Mexican-Americans and others). The relationship of these groups to American society as a whole. Contemporary issues such as discrimination, bilingual/bicultural education, undocumented aliens and immigration legislation. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 349: Health, Illness, and the Body

This course explores the social factors that influence the delivery and consumption of medical and health care in the United States. The roles of medicine and of the health care provider and the patient are examined in a variety of settings. Specific issues confronting American medicine are considered, and the health care delivery system is compared with systems from other countries. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 350: Sociological Theory I

This course, primarily for Sociology Majors, surveys the development of the major concepts and schools of sociological theory, emphasizing the origins of theory in the works of the "classical" European writers of the 18th and 19th century. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites: Junior standing and 12 hours of Sociology; or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 351: Sociological Theory Ii: Contemporary Theory

This course, primarily for Sociology Majors, surveys the development of the major concepts and schools of sociological theory, emphasizing recent and contemporary theory in the works of modern European and American writers. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites: Junior standing and 12 hours of Sociology; or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 360: Research Methods in the Social Sciences

This course provides an introduction to the general principles of research methods in the social sciences. The major steps in the social science research process are used as the basis for the course outline. Guidelines for the assessment and utilization for social research are discussed. Research theory is combined with practical exercises in research methods. The writing of a research proposal is one of the major course requirements. Three lecture hours per week. Requirement for Sociology majors.
Prerequisites: SOC 206, Junior standing and 12 hours of Sociology; or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 370: Seminar: Issues in the Sociology of Children

This capstone class for students with a child studies cognate will provide them the opportunity to focus on a particular area of inquiry for the term. They will read a core set of materials, discuss them, conduct research on the seminar topic and present their findings to the class in both written and verbal form. When completed, students will have demonstrated skills that will prepare them for the marketplace or for further educational pursuits. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or SOC220 or permission of the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 390: Community Involvement

Academic credits may be earned for community service projects as approved by the Sociology Department Chairperson. Normally restricted to Sociology, Social Work, Nursing and Political Science majors in their Junior or Senior year. Other students who have specific community projects may be admitted with the permission of Department Chairperson. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis unless prior and specific arrangements are made. Fieldwork and appointments with instructor replace lectures. A maximum of six credits may be earned with no more than 3 credits taken in any given semester.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 401: Community Involvement

Academic credits may be earned for community service projects as approved by the Sociology Department Chairperson. Normally restricted to Sociology, Social Work, Nursing and Political Science majors in their Junior or Senior year. Other students who have specific community projects may be admitted with the permission of Department Chairperson. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis unless prior and specific arrangements are made. Fieldwork and appointments with instructor replace lectures. A maximum of six credits may be earned with no more than 3 credits taken in any given semester.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 403: Research Methods in the Social Sciences

This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of social research by presenting different research methods employed by social scientist. This includes interviews, surveys, ethnography/field research, experiments, and content/text analysis, among other methodologies. This class will focus on the logic and practice of researching design, the relationship between theory and research, forms of data collection, the ethics of research, data analysis, and the writing of research proposals and empirical papers. We will explore the strengths and weaknesses of the different methods, and will combine research theory with practical skills. Three lecture hours per week. Requirement for Sociology majors. This course fulfills the W-III core requirement.
Prerequisites: W-II, SOC 206, Junior standing and 12 hours of Sociology; or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 404: Data Analysis

The objective of this course is to provide students with skills in data analysis and interpretation as crucial steps in the research process. Knowledge of social science theory; research methods, statistics, and computer programs gained in previous courses is applied by working with available data. Three lecture hours per week. Requirement for B.S. Sociology, Computer Science and Research options, B.S. Criminal Justice, Research and Planning Concentration.
Prerequisites: Junior standing and 12 hours of Sociology including SOC206; or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 412: Directed Studies in African-american Studies

An in-depth exploration of the fundamentals of African-American studies. The course is designed to help students explore, in their own style, the major theories and issues in the study of the Black experience. A final paper is required in addition to weekly meetings and discussions.
Prerequisites: Four courses in African-American Studies. Open to African American Studies minors and to others by permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 420: Internship in Sociology

Extensive and valuable sociological involvement: field experience in agency, institution or business setting. Interns must be available 8-10 hours per week including regular meetings with the Chairperson. A journal and final report must be submitted for evaluation in addition to an evaluation by field supervisor. Open only to Sociology Majors in Junior or Senior year.
Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 430: Directed Study in Sociology

An individualized program involving study in depth of some aspect of sociology or social service, under the direction of a faculty member of the Sociology Department. Research papers required. Students must present a proposal for approval at a Department meeting and later defend their research and conclusions at a subsequent meeting of the Department.
Prerequisites: Junior standing and 12 hours of Sociology; or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 470: Capstone Seminar in Sociology

The capstone seminar is an intense culminating intellectual experience that creates the opportunity for students to review and apply their knowledge of the field through discussion of topics representative of the core areas of the discipline. Department faculty members will each attend a session of the class to facilitate a discussion in their area of expertise. In this course students will reflect on the field and will synthesize their knowledge of the core areas to select the theoretical perspective that best represents their point of view. Students will also assemble, finalize, and submit a portfolio of the work they have done during their tenure in the department. Student participation in class discussions, the content of the portfolio, and journal reflections on their experiences in the course will be the basis for the grade in the course. Open only to Sociology Majors in their senior year. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 512: Directed Studies in African-american Studies

An in-depth exploration of the fundamentals of African-American studies. The course is designed to help students explore, in their own style, the major theories and issues in the study of the Black experience. A final paper is required in addition to weekly meetings and discussions.
Prerequisites: Four courses in African-American Studies. Open to African American Studies minors and to others by permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 520: Internship in Sociology

Extensive and valuable sociological involvement: field experience in agency, institution or business setting. Interns must be available 8-10 hours per week including regular meetings with the Chairperson. A journal and final report must be submitted for evaluation in addition to an evaluation by field supervisor. Open only to Sociology Majors in Junior or Senior year.
Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 530: Directed Study in Sociology

An individualized program involving study in depth of some aspect of sociology or social service, under the direction of a faculty member of the Sociology Department. Research papers required. Students must present a proposal for approval at a Department meeting and later defend their research and conclusions at a subsequent meeting of the Department.
Prerequisites: Junior standing and 12 hours of Sociology; or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 570: Capstone Seminar in Sociology

The capstone seminar is an intense culminating intellectual experience that creates the opportunity for students to review and apply their knowledge of the field through discussion of topics representative of the core areas of the discipline. Department faculty members will each attend a session of the class to facilitate a discussion in their area of expertise. In this course students will reflect on the field and will synthesize their knowledge of the core areas to select the theoretical perspective that best represents their point of view. Students will also assemble, finalize, and submit a portfolio of the work they have done during their tenure in the department. Student participation in class discussions, the content of the portfolio, and journal reflections on their experiences in the course will be the basis for the grade in the course. Open only to Sociology Majors in their senior year. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SOC 715: Sociology of the American Family

The course includes the analysis of the American family as a social institution and the implications of the kinship system; the intrasocietal comparisons, goals of society with the goals of family and as responsive to the social and cultural milieu in which it operates.

Credits: 3.00

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