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A study of the literature of America from the early nineteenth century to the Civil War, with emphasis on the various manifestations of romanticism in the writings of the period.

Credits: 3.00

Contemporary American Fiction introduces students to the graduate-level study of significant works of fiction by still-active and recently active writers in the United States.

Credits: 3.00

A study of the development of the early American novel. Some of the writers to be considered are Brown, Cooper, Hawthorne, Stowe, Alcott, Jewett, and Melville.

Credits: 3.00

This course introduces students to the theories and practices of using digital tools and methodologies for humanities research. The course will dover a range of topics within the digital humanities, such as the role of technology in digital humanities, ongoing intellectual debates in the field, and applications of critical theory to new media technologies. Students will also gain hand-on experience working on digital scholarship.

Credits: 3.00

This course offers an intensive examination of highly specialized areas in digital studies. May be repeated, with a different topic, for up to 6 credits with permission of the English MA graduate coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

The course will examine the work of African American novelists and short story writers from William Well Brown to the present, including such major figures as Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, and Toni Morrison. The course will place the writing in its historical setting and emphasize the development of the African American tradition in fiction.

Credits: 3.00

This course provides an introduction to teaching English to speakers of other languages in varied contexts in the United States and abroad. Current methods and approaches will be explored and practiced. Topics include working with diverse populations, teaching language in context, developing lessons and curriculum for specific age groups and situations, aspects of literacy, and issues surrounding culture and identity. Field experience hours are required. This course is not required for those seeking licensure in K – 72 schools.

Credits: 3.00

This course introduces students to thinking and writing about literature in the context of the discipline's academic discourse. The course focuses on familiarizing students with debates and problems relevant to the field, researching secondary literature, and writing for a scholarly audience. Required of all MA students in their first semester in the program.

Credits: 3.00

This course offers an opportunity for students to study a specific area in theory. Possibilities might include the study of theoretical issues such as aesthetics, theoretical movements such as critical race studies or theorist such as Michel Foucault. This course may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits where the topics are different. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course is designed to prepare English as a Second Language (ESL) licensure candidates to plan, implement, and manage standards-based ESL and Sheltered English Immersion (SEI) content instruction in PreK-12 schools. Students will apply their knowledge of evidence-based ESL practices and strategies to classrooms that serve English language learners (ELLs) from diverse backgrounds across grade levels and program models. Emphasis will be placed on developing and integrating language skills within the context of thematic units aligned to the Massachusetts curriculum frameworks. Students will also learn to evaluate, adapt, and develop materials and assessments for English language learns (ELLs) in PreK-12 contexts. Three lecture hours per week plus pre-practicum field experiences in a PreK-12 school.
Prerequisites: ENG 770N or EDS 770N - Context and Culture in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages and ENG 792 or EDS 792 - Introduction to TESOL Methods.

Credits: 3.00

This course investigates the background and philosophies of teaching English Language Arts 8-12, focusing on methods and materials in the classroom. Topics inlcude curriculum development, unit and lesson planning, teaching resources, classroom practice and management, testing and assessment, the integration of the arts and humanities, and the role of technology in teaching English. A review of national and state standards, the Massachusetts Frameworks, and social, political and cultural issues of concern to the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) will be conducted. Includes a 25-hour pre-practicum field experience at an area middle or secondary school.
Prerequisites: EDG705, EDU709, EDU814, and permission of program coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

This course introduces students to the discipline of writing and rhetoric, its formation, histories, theories, and methodologies. Students will study key concepts, theories, and practices as well as trace and explore historical and ongoing conversations in the discipline. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course is designed to acquaint teachers and librarians with the latest in literature for the junior and senior high schooler. It explores the literary tastes of today's young adults and suggests relevant material for inclusion in the literature program. Emphasis is placed on teaching techniques which will encourage young people of varying abilities to read widely and voluntarily.

Credits: 3.00

Readings in the famous novels of the age: Austen, Brontes, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, Wilde, and others. Other genres also will be considered.

Credits: 3.00

A study of selected topics in the works of Shakespeare. More specific information on particular points of focus is provided in the brochure for the semester in which the course is offered.

Credits: 3.00

The week long institute is for teachers and teachers-in-training and brings Shakespeare's plays to life through performance techniques and scholarly research. The institute focuses on a single play and is co-led with faculty from Salem State and staff/actors from Actor's Shakespeare Project. Students will do some acting, learn about curriculum development, and generate both teaching lesson plans/assessments and a short scholarly project. Online discussions after the institute and a reconvene meeting are also required. May be repeated for credit or taken only for professional development points. As establishing pre-institute communication is necessary, enrollment is by permission of the coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

This course provides a foundation for understanding the field of teaching English to speakers of other languages. Local, national, and international contexts are examined and used in investigating various historical and current approaches to teaching English language learners. Topics include laws and language policies, cultural identity, language diversity, and culturally responsive teaching to forge family and/or community relations. Field-based assignments are required.

Credits: 3.00

This course investigates the relationship between language and human society. Students will evaluate current and classic socialinguistic theory and research and will gather language data for an original research paper. Students will become familiar with a variety of topics applicable to this field including language variety; language and ethnicity; language choice; language and gender; and aspects of language and culture. The challenges inherent to societal issues related language, literacy, and education will be covered in depth.

Credits: 3.00

This course will provide in-depth analysis of the components of language: syntax, phonetics, phonology, morphology, and semantics. Students will apply concepts to language teaching and learning. Field-based hours are required. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course examines the assessment of English Language Learners (ELLs) for a variety of purposes including documenting the effects of instruction on student learning and using assessment to inform instruction. Students will design and analyze performance assessments and indicators for second language learners in English as a Second Language (ESL) and Sheltered English Immersion (SEI) classrooms. Students will also become familiar with placement and content-area tests that meet state requirements and will design original assessments focused on content and language development designed to measure academic achievement for linguistically diverse students. Field experience hours are required. Prerequisites: ENG/EDS 770N - Context and Culture in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages and ENG/EDS - 792 Introduction to TESOL Methods.

Credits: 3.00

This course examines a range of literary responses to genocide through such media as fiction, creative non-fiction, poetry, eye-witness testimony, human rights documents, and documentary and feature films. Readings are drawn from various world regions, and concentrate primarily on post-1945 texts which investigate common concerns of Genocide Studies such as ethics, gendericide, trauma, justice and retribution. The course may culminate in a research project in a chosen area. Three Lecture Hours. Prerequisite: ENG 725.

Credits: 3.00

This course offers an opportunity for students to study texts drawn from World literatures. Possibilities might include study of a significant author or work in a global context, or examination of various genres or traditions in World Literature. This course may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. Multiple enrollments in a term are allowed.

Credits: 3.00

This course will introduce students to theories and research methodologies that inform feminist scholarship in rhetoric. Students will have the opportunity to read work by major feminist scholars, develop their own commitments as writers and scholars, and research subjects of interest. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

A study and travel course that incorporates a research trip to a location appropriate to the course. Topic varies. May be repeated up to two times for up to a total of six credits. Students will be responsible for travel costs. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

Credits: 3.00

This course will investigate the research and theories which inform current composition pedagogy. Students will practice adapting various theoretical perspectives to actual classroom situations.

Credits: 3.00

A writing course for those who wish to concentrate exclusively on poetry. Participants will be expected to write a series of poems, to read widely in contemporary poetry and in poetic theory and to write critical reviews. This course may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. Three lecture hours.

Credits: 3.00

Lecture and workshop methods are combined to represent the fine points of writing poetry and fiction. Readings in contemporary fiction and poetry.

Credits: 3.00

A workshop course concentrating on the short stories, novels-in-progress, and nonfiction narratives of the participants. Workshop members read and critique one another's work and discuss works by accomplished authors. Topics include how to public. This course may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits.

Credits: 3.00

A specialized course for teachers of English but open to everyone. Investigating the research and theories which inform current literature pedagogy. Using historical and theoretical perspectives to develop their own pedagogical framework, students will consider their assumptions, experiences, and strategies for teaching literature, and decide how to adapt current models to their own classroom situations.

Credits: 3.00

A course in writing nonfiction, ranging from the personal to the objective, from brief journalistic pieces to literary essays. Classes will involve workshop discussions of students' writing, attention to the details of style, and the study of lessons derived from professional writers. This course may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. Three lecture hours.

Credits: 3.00

A comprehensive foundation in the syntactical structures of English as a basis for an investigation of stylistics. Designed for educators, writers and editors, this course considers such questions as grammatical "correctness" from the perspectives of both sociolinguists and historians of English and extends to considerations of effectiveness, grace, emphasis, and suitability of styles for a range of both subject matter and audiences.

Credits: 3.00

A writing course for those who wish to concentrate on memoir and related prose forms including fiction, creative non-fiction, and hybrid texts. Workshop members will submit work in progress for in-class criticism and commentary. The coursework will include deriving lessons from exemplary published memoirs and nonfiction. Information on publishing will be given. This course may be repeated for up to nine credits.

Credits: 3.00

This course introduces students to an expanded definition of writing through the study and practice of digital writing. Students will engage with contemporary scholarship (e.g. rhetoric, semiotics, digital humanities) to understand theories and practices of digital writing. They also will consider how the digital world affords writers the genres, strategies, tools, and platforms for composing beyond text and print. For the hands-on experience needed to effectively create digital content, students will analyze and compose digital texts, such as comics, videos, websites, podcasts, and blogs.

Credits: 3.00

An intensive examination of highly specialized topical areas in American literature and criticism. This course may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. Three lecture hours.

Credits: 3.00

This course offers an intensive examination of highly specialized topical areas in British Literature and Criticism. This course may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. Three lecture hours.

Credits: 3.00

This course offers students the opportunity to explore current, relevant subjects and issues in the field of writing. Among the topics that may be offered are Nature Writing, Playwriting, Screenwriting, Sports Writing, and Travel Writing. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: 3.00

This course examines current research methods in the field of ESL teaching and students will develop the ability to read and conduct classroom research. Quantitative and qualitative methods, such as ethnography, focus group, case study, and action research will be considered. Teacher research in the ESL classroom will be emphasized. Students will develop a detailed research proposal and conduct a pilot study designed to investigate language acquisition and language teaching. Prerequisite: ENG 770N / EDS 770N- Context and Culture in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

Credits: 3.00

This course examines the theory and practice of grammar instruction in the second language context. Students will apply the study of grammatical forms and structures of English to teaching English in context. Students will develop original lesson plans that incorporate grammar instruction and technology into a standards-based framework. Field-based assignments are required.

Credits: 3.00

Required of graduate assistants assigned to the Writing Center, but also open to other graduate students. The course offers training in composition theory, practice in the conference method of teaching writing, and participation in the operations of the Writing Center. Requirements include regular weekly tutoring in the Writing Center and a project on composition theory and practice.
Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor.

Credits: 3.00

An independent reading, research, and/or writing project supervised by a member of the English graduate faculty. Can be repeated once for a maximum of six credits. Pre-approval by graduate coordinator and supervising faculty member required before a student enrolls in the course.

Credits: 3.00

In this 1-3 credit internship, graduate students intern with a faculty member of gain practical experience applying digital humanities theory to practice. Through research, hands-on collaboration, and individual meetings, interns work with the faculty member on a digital humanities project to develop advanced research skills in digital scholarship, apply digital tools to humanities research, and expand project management skills. May be repeated for a total of three credits.
Prerequisites: ENG713 and permission of the instructor and the graduate coordinator.

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00

In this 1-3 credit internship, graduate students intern with a faculty member to gain practical experience and knowledge in college-level pedagogy. Through reading, research, individual meetings, and classroom observation, interns work with the faculty member in syllabus design, research and preparation for lectures, activity design, and classroom management. May be repeated up to three times for a total of 3 credits.
Prerequisites: ENG 725 and permission of the instructor and the graduate coordinator.

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00

This is an advanced literature course that follows a student-driven approach to course content and includes student presentations and a significant culminating project. Topics vary according to instructor. Required of all M.A. in English students with literature option.
Prerequisite: ENG725; all seminar enrollees must have completed 15 credits in graduate studies toward an English M.A., M.A.T., or M.A./M.A.T. May be repeated once for credit.

Credits: 3.00

The first half of a two-semester sequence designed for MAT in English and MAT in ESL candidates. Planned with the program coordinator and approved by the Graduate Dean, this course is devoted to research and theory.
Prerequisite: Permission of the graduate coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

The Portfolio Capstone is a 1-2 semester-long project/course in which students in the M.A. or M.A./M.A.T. English Program with an option in Literature showcase the work that they have produced, engage in substantive revisions, and create two new papers: an introductory narrative and an independent paper. The student works closely with a faculty advisor.
Prerequisites: 24 Graduate English credits, ENG 725, matriculation into the M.A. or M.A./M.A.T. English program. This course is repeatable for a total of six credits.

Credits: 3.00

The Manuscript Capstone in Writing is a 1-2 semester-long course in which students in the M.A. or M.A./M.A.T. English Program writing option complete an original work of significant length in a single genre. The student works closely with a faculty advisor.
Prerequisites: matriculation into the M.A./M.A.T. program, 24 credits toward M.A. or M.A./M.A.T. in English degree, ENG 725, approval of graduate coordinator. This course is repeatable for a total of six credits.

Credits: 3.00

The Thesis Capstone is a 1-2 semester-long course in which students in the M.A. or M.A./M.A.T. English Program with an option in Literature write a scholarly thesis. The student works closely with a faculty advisor.
Prerequisites: matriculation into the M.A. or M.A./M.A.T. program, cumulative G.P.A. of 3.75 or higher, 24 credits toward M.A. or M.A./M.A.T. in English degree, ENG 725, ENG 726, approval of graduate coordinator. Repeatable once for a total of six credits.

Credits: 3.00

This course provides Summer Bridge Academy students with an overview of basic writing and study skills with emphasis on methods of generating writing and revising, reading responses, and research. Attention to sentence-level issues on an individual basis. Students learn about their academic community through writing assignments connecting them to local cultural institutions and to the university first year reading experience as well as participating in weekly writing support sessions. This course does not satisfy any part of the English Department First-Year Writing Program or W-I requirement. This course does count towards graduation. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course provides students with opportunities to build skills in reading and writing. Students will practice analyzing texts, finding ideas, drafting, revising, and using conventions for rhetorical effect. Students may opt to take this course as a pre-cursor to ENL110. Three lecture hours. Not open to students who have received credit for ENL101 or its equivalent.
Prerequisite: Students must complete Writing Self-Placement to enroll in this course and all other first-year writing courses.

Credits: 3.00

This course prepares matriculated multilingual student writers for academic writing. Through extensive practice in reading both fiction and non-fiction and writing in a variety of styles and genres, students will improve their ability to write in the stylistic and grammatical conventions of academic English. Students will develop strategies in generating ideas, revising their work, incorporating the ideas of others, and editing. Students will also gain expertise in composing in electronic environments. Three lecture hours a week.
Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of English Department placement procedure.

Credits: 3.00

This course provides multilingual student writers an introduction to the foundational knowledge, literacies, and composing strategies that will help prepare them for writing across the disciplines, in the workplace, and in their local and global communities. Course work includes developing overall proficiency in the stylistic and grammatical conventions of academic writing in English. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites: Students must complete Writing Self-Placement to enroll in this course and all other first-year writing courses.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level I

This course provides an introduction to the foundational knowledge, literacies, and composing strategies that will help prepare students for writing across the disciplines, in the workplace, and in their local and global communities.
Pre-/Co-requisite: Students must complete Writing Self-Placement to enroll in this course and all other first-year writing courses.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level I

This course provides student enrolled in the honors program with an enriched introduction to the foundational knowledge, literacies, and composing strategies that will help prepare student for writing across the disciplines, in the workplace, and in their local and global communities. Specifically, the course shall emphasize the honors program's commitment to building a dedicated community that masters intellectual rigor, inquiry, and self-discovery.
Prerequisite: Only open to students enrolled in the honors program.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level I

What is literature, how is it written, and what does it do? Through a variety of special topics, this course will examine the nature of literary creation. Students will analyze and practice the modes, strategies, and skills of literary expression. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite/Co-requisite: W-I.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Creative Expression & Apprec

An exploration of the role of literature in understanding contemporary British society. Through texts from 1945 to the present, this course will examine how literary analysis and cultural criticism provide insight on social relations and institutions in post-war Britain. Students will practice close reading through evidence-based inquiry and analysis as they consider the relationship between historical and social contexts, aesthetics, and representation. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Creative Expression & Apprec, Contemporary Society

Literary works from a broad historical range and a variety of genres will be grouped around a common topic and students will examine how writers approach significant questions from different perspectives. "Classics" will be juxtaposed with works from diverse time periods and cultures. Emphasis will be on developing framing questions and reading intertextually. Form, content, and aesthetics will be considered as students work on developing interpretive skills and forming questions. Required of Bachelor of Arts, English Majors. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

Through intensive close-reading practices, students will get to know a small number of literary works in great depth. Students will learn research methods as they study myriad aspects of the text(s) and context(s). Areas of focus may include: literary and historical traditions, sources, influences, intertexts, form, genre, aesthetics, thematics, and reception. Required of Bachelor of Arts, English Majors. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

What do stories tell us about where we came from and how we got here? An introduction to foundations of world literature through the seventeenth century, the course will consider the role of storytelling and the place of literature in attempts to document and to understand the human past. Attention will be given to what distinguishes literary expression and to how we can read literature alongside other kinds of historical evidence. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENL 260, or ENG 294.
Prerequisite or corequisite: Level I Written Communications course (W-I) or equivalent.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Creative Expression & Apprec, The Human Past

An introduction to touchstone works of literature since the eighteenth century from diverse cultures in Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Europe. The worlds and world views that literary works convey and create are studied in their difference and diversity, in relation to one another, and in relation to the experiences of the reader. Individual courses will be organized around big questions such as "to whom are we responsible?" or "what is the role of the artists?" or around such themes as "empire, colonialism, and globalization," "gender and sexuality in local and global contexts," or "friendship". Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG261.
Prerequisite/Co-requisite: A W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Creative Expression & Apprec, World Cultures

How are changing times reflected in literary texts? What enduring and shifting values and ideas does literature convey? Through a variety of special topics, this course will employ a literary lens to examine the human past and will explore the relationship of the past to the present by reading literary texts alongside other forms of historical evidence. Three lecture hours per week.
Pre/Co-requisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: The Human Past

This course introduces students to the major components of language and will explore the ways that language is used on a variety of professional, political, and cultural contexts. Three lecture hours or week.
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

An introduction to creative writing, with students practicing writing in genres such as poetry, fiction, and drama. Students will share their work in class and gain exposure to contemporary literature. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG 300 or ENL 320. Three lecture hours per week.
Pre/Co-requisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Creative Expression & Apprec

The course allows students in the Honors Program to use writing to examine topics of interest to an academic audience. Through a range of assignments, students will develop their writing process, consider how to compose in different genre and for difference audiences, and learn to use writing as a tool for critically thinking about a subject.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level II

Beginning in the experience of the senses, this course will explore such subjects as figurative language, symbolism, diction, sound, rhythm, and form as they contribute to the understanding of individual poems. Reading will include selections from both classic and contemporary works, focusing on both historical and cultural context and on individual expression. Students will also be creating their own poems as an aspect of learning to read and appreciate poetry as an art form. Assignments will include a research project involving critical commentary on a single poem, a short literary analysis, and a review of a poetry reading. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Creative Expression & Apprec

An exploration of topics in contemporary society through literature. Each section of this course will focus on a particular topic - for example immigrant identities, urban culture, contemporary Iran or the Bosnian genocide - and examine how literary analysis and cultural criticism provide insight on social relations and institutions relevant to the topic. Student will practice evidence-based inquiry and analysis through close reading as they consider the relationship between historical and social contexts, aesthetics, and representation. Three lecture hours per week. Pre/Co-requisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society

In this workshop, student will learn strategies for analyzing and composing radio-style audio projects in various genres, such as audio documentaries, non-fiction stories and podcasts, for divergent audiences. Drawing on communication theories, students will explore the affordances, effects and potentialities of using sound such as voice, music, sound effects and silence for communicative purposes in a variety of situations. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites: W-1

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Oral Communication, Written Communication-Level II

This course uses literature as a focus for developing student writing. Through close, critical reading techniques and writing in a variety of analytical genres related to literary study, students will explore a particular topic in literature. In so doing, students will develop an understanding of the generic conventions of literary scholarship, the process by which knowledge is made in the discipline, and concepts and language for discussing literature. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level II

A study of major British literary figures who are representative of the early, medieval and renaissance periods. Emphasis upon the major characteristics of each literary period and the relationships among them. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG225.
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

A study of major British literary figures who are representative of the Neo-Classic, Romantic and Victorian periods. Emphasis upon the major characteristics of each literary period and the relationships among them. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG226.
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course exposes students to a variety of literary works and traditions while at the same time encourages them to examine their broader relationship to other creative art forms and areas of humanistic inquiry. Students will gain an understanding of the creative process through engagement with various works, literary and otherwise, and participate in activities and projects that encourage students to create and express themselves. Regular classroom experiences will be augmented by guest lectures by SSU faculty and other specialists, as well as field trips to museums, concerts, and other venues. Open only to students enrolled in the Honors Program. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for either ENL264H or 265H.
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Creative Expression & Apprec

A survey of Colonial and early national United States literature, up to and including the Civil War period. Classes may emphasize important Puritan, and antebellum writers as well as other significant traditions of this period. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG355.
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Creative Expression & Apprec

This course covers United States literature since the Civil War. Classes may emphasize important realist, naturalist, Modernist, and post-Modernist writers as well as other significant traditions during the late-nineteenth century through to the present day. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG356
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Creative Expression & Apprec

This course will study the spectrum of ethic literatures written in the United States from the second half of the twentieth century to the present and will focus on the ways that the texts convey experiences of belonging and difference in a variety of communities, from the family to the nation. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: W-I

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Diversity, Power Dyn, Soc Just, Written Communication-Level II

This course will study leading movements and figures in the African American literary tradition up to 1930. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG266, ENG386. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Diversity, Power Dyn, Soc Just

This course examines the African American literary tradition from the modem period to the present through the lenses of race and power. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG267 or ENG387. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Diversity, Power Dyn, Soc Just

This course is a study of selected major works of literature concentrating on the pre-Christian era. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG296. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG296.
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course will explore cultural diversity and worldviews expressed in the literature of one or more cultures outside the US. Each course will introduce the literary representation of a prticular4 set of cultural perspectives and their place in an increasingly diverse and interdependent global community. Through reading and responding to texts, students will acquire an understanding of and sensitivity to varied cultural perspectives, challenge and enrich their own views, and develop as global citizens. Three lecture hours per week.
Pre- or Co-requisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: World Cultures

A study of the development of film as an aesthetic, cultural, and historical form. Considers film's interaction with historical contexts, technological developments, and questions of representation. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for MEC245 or ENG245.
Open only to students in the Honors Program.
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

Introduces students to methods of film analysis. Considers the particularities of the medium and vocabulary of film. Explores key debates in film theory including questions of realism, formalism, authorship, and film as language. Investigates influences such as Marxism, psychoanalysis, reception theory, and narrative theory on film analysis. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for MEC246 or ENG246.
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

A comparative study of themes, ideas, and styles in fiction, non-fiction, and poetry in print and on film. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG317.
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

An analytical study of short films, and media productions based on literature. Students will prepare productions of film and slide tapes on literature and library themes. Three lecture hours including workshop sessions per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG318.
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: ENL102, ENL102ESL, ENL103, ENL106H or ENL110/H.

Credits: 3.00

A topics-based course in classical drama. Possible topics include (but are not limited to): Greek Tragedy and Comedy, Medieval and Early Renaissance Drama, and Classical Japanese Theatre. Three seminar hours per week.
Prerequisite: A W-I course or equivalent.

Credits: 3.00

This course explores various non-western dramatic traditions, including both ancient and modern examples. Three lecture hours per week. It is not open to students who have received credit for ENG255.
Prerequisite: A W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: World Cultures

A workshop course in advanced expository writing, involving regular peer review of manuscripts and evaluation by the instructor both in class and in conference. Students will focus specifically on various approaches to exposition, techniques for writing, and elements of style. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG400.
Prerequisites: A W-I course and at least one English course at the 200-level or above.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level II

This course of grammar for professional writers of prose in areas such as journalism, essay writing, fiction, and professional or business writing. The course will review basic grammar, including the parts of speech, phrases, clauses, and types of sentences. It will focus on correct, efficient, and stylistically distinguished sentence structures. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG325.
Prerequisite: A W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course will introduce students to contemporary theory and approaches in teaching English as a Second Language (ESL). It will also prepare students with knowledge and skills to help ELLs at varying stages of proficiency to acquire both English language skills and content. The ways that first and second languages are learned will be explored and students will become familiar with an interactive approach to language pedagogy. Topics include: second language acquisition, linguistic awareness, sheltered English immersion, and contemporary methods and approaches to teaching language. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: A W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

A general introduction to the large field of professional writing, focusing on the many different types of writing and the specific requirements for each area - business, technical, journalism, internet, media, etc. This course will include classroom analysis and lectures from professionals in the field, with some practical writing assignments due throughout the course. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG301.
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level II

This course covers literary editing techniques appropriate for the option in professional writing. Students will develop both reading and critical skills, focusing not only on correct grammar and usage, but also on purpose, audience, and especially styles. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG303.
Prerequisites: A W-I course and at least one English course at the 200-level or above.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level II

Fundamentals of business communication, which involves business vocabulary, letter writing, public relations writing, the mechanics of persuasive style, business reports, etc. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG402.
Prerequisite: A W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level II

This course covers writing and marketing travel articles for newspapers and magazines and writing brochures and publicity for hotels, resorts, and other tourist attractions. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level II

Digital Writing is a W-II course whose goal is to equip students with the knowledge and tools needed to effectively communicate and create content using forms of digital media. Students will learn how various modalities - visual, alphabetic, and aural-function and intersect in digital writing, and the factors that need to be considered when composing with them. Students will analyze and compose digital texts such as comics, videos, podcasts, websites and blogs. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: W-I.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level II

The Craft of Poetry is a writing course that offers a thorough, hands-on exploration of poetic craft. Students will learn about meter and various poetic forms, such as the sonnet, villanelle, and sestina. The course will also cover technique for free verse, concentration on line length, line breaks, and stanza length, with attention given to other poetic elements - word choice, diction, tone, imagery. Students will turn in a portfolio of poems and write short papers. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG403A.
Prerequisite: A W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This writing course uses a sequence of single-focus writing exercises and prose models to promote mastery of the techniques of writing fiction. Topics include narrative structure, characterization, point-of-view, narration, description, voice and dialogue, and prose style. Writing assignments enable students to explore a variety of prose forms. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG407.
Prerequisite: A W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

An examination of the short story as a literary art form. This course will explore the writing of short stories as well as writing about short stories. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG330. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level II

Students study classic and contemporary literature for children in grades one through six. Emphasized in this study are the origins and genres of children's literature; literary elements; strategies for teaching children's literature, and key issues in the field, such as cultural and gender stereotyping and the treatment of sensitive subjects. Three lecture hours per week. Students may receive credit for ENL334 or EDU334 but not both. Not open to students who have received credit for EDU321 or ENG334.
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

A study of poetry written from 1900-1945 that covers such writers as Eliot, Yeats, Hughes, Williams, Stevens, and Moore. The course will examine writers' relations to the era's major movements. Three lecture hours per week.Not open to students who have received credit for ENG390.
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

An in-depth study of Shakespeare's histories and comedies--about eight to ten plays--as well as one or more narrative poems. The class will focus on cultural and formal issues and features within Shakespeare's writings as well as cultural trends that Shakespeare responded to and helped shape. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG331.
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

An in-depth study of Shakespeare's tragedies and romances--about eight to ten plays--as well as his sonnets. The class will focus on cultural and formal issues and features within Shakespeare's writings as well as cultural trends that Shakespeare responded to and helped to shape. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG332
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

A critical survey of major British novelists of the nineteenth century, with an emphasis on the blend of the Romantic, Victorian, and Realistic traditions found in their works. The readings will be drawn from such writers as Austen, the Brontes, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG335.
Prerequisite: ENG102, ENL 102, ENG102E, ENL102ESL, ENG103, ENL 103, ENG106H, or ENL106H and at least one course at the 200-level or permission of the chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

This course examines U.S. Latino/a literary achievements in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, considering the various literary traditions, such as Chicano/a, Nuyorican, Cuban-American, and Dominican-American, that together make up U.S. Latino/a literature. The focus will be on common concerns of U.S. Latino/a writers such as ethnic identity and minority status, prejudice and discrimination, immigration and migration, bilingualism and linguistic hybridity, machismo and gender roles. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG389.
Prerequisite: ENG102, ENL 102, ENG102E, ENL102ESL, ENG103, ENL 103, ENG106H, or ENL106H and at least one course at the 200-level or permission of the chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Diversity, Power Dyn, Soc Just

A study of contemporary writing for young adults at the junior high school level. Other materials in curriculum enrichment are included. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG489.
Prerequisite: A W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course introduces students to Native American literature and to the historical, literary and cultural influences shaping Native American writers. Special attention is given to such recurrent themes and artistic concerns in Native literature as genocide, sovereignty, relocation, tribal identity, mythology, and orality. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Diversity, Power Dyn, Soc Just, World Cultures

The course will study a variety of fiction by twentieth-century women authors and will focus on the authors' works as chronicles of the life experiences of women as well as expressions of the particular problems and sensibilities of women writers. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG360.
Prerequisite: A W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

A study of modern masterpieces, including such writers as Joyce, Proust, Mann, and Kafka and their effect on twentieth century fiction. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG393.
Prerequisite: ENG102.

Credits: 3.00

This course is an introduction to Caribbean literature written in English with emphasis on the contemporary period. Readings are in all literary genres and include such writers as Derek Walcott, Edward K. Brathwaite, V.S. and Shiva Naipaul, Edgar Mittelholzer, Sam Selvon, George Lamming, Jean Rhys, Merle Hodge, Jamaica Kincaid, Errol John, Earl Lovelace, Zee Edgell and Olive Senior. Attention is given to the development of distinctively Caribbean techniques and themes. Three lecture hours per week. Offered in alternate years. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG399.
Prerequisite: ENG102, ENL 102, ENG102E, ENL102ESL, ENG103, ENL 103, ENG106H, or ENL106H and at least one course at the 200-level or permission of the chairperson

Credits: 3.00

A study of mystery fiction as a popular genre from the Romantic era to contemporary times. Emphasis will be on the broad area of mystery fiction including suspense, detective, horror, and spy fiction as it develops from Mrs. Radcliffe through the Victorian era to the twentieth century. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG368.
Prerequisite: ENG102, ENL 102, ENG102E, ENL102ESL, ENG103, ENL 103, ENG106H, or ENL106H and at least one course at the 200-level or permission of the chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

A comparative study of women's roles and their depiction in literature and film. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG417.
Prerequisite: W-I or equivalent.

Credits: 3.00

A workshop which continues the examination of women in the two media. The ultimate goal of the course is student production of films and slide-tapes based on the themes of the course. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG418.
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

Graphic novels have gained recognition and respect for their merging of written and visual arts. This course will focus on reading, analyzing and evaluating the new form. Major figures, such as Art Spiegelman, Alan Moore and Marjane Satrapi, and significant subgenres, such as autobiographical narratives, superheroes, and mangas, will be examined.
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This is an upper division seminar on a special topic in film studies. Three lecture hours per week. Course may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: A W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

Modern Drama I is a study of some of the major movements of 20th century drama, from the beginnings of Modernism through the Second World War. The course meets for three lecture hours per week. It is not open to students who have received credit for ENG 490. Prerequisite: Level I Written Communication (W-I) or equivalent.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level II

Modern Drama II is a study of some of the major movements of the 20th and 21st century drama, from the Second World War to the present. The course meets for three lecture hours per week. It is not open to students who have received credit for ENG491.
Prerequisite: A W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course is an examination of classic statements of literary criticism and theory from Plato to modern times that delineate the contours and the problems of literary discourse. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG321.
Prerequisites: A W-I course and at least one English course at the 200-level or above.

Credits: 3.00

A writing course in literary journalism requiring students to write assignments intended for publican on-line as well as in newspapers, periodicals, and books. These assignments, including profiles, book reviews, personal reportage, and journalistic essays, reflect the genre's focus on journalism of enduring literary value, as distinct from the primarily quotidian value of news reporting. Works by professional literary journalists serve as models. Students critique one another's work and place successful work in the college newspaper. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG313.
Prerequisites: A W-I course and at least one English course at the 200-level or above.

Credits: 3.00

This seminar will focus on a genre or skill for professional writers utilizing feedback and revision, in preparing literary material for print or electronic media. This class is limited to English majors and minors, or with approval by the Department Chairperson. Three lecture hours per week. May be repeated for credit once.
Prerequisites: A W-I course and at least once English course at the 200-level or above.

Credits: 3.00

An intensive examination of the field of publishing for professional writers, the class will examine business models for nonfiction book and magazine publishers, professional workflow dynamics in organizations, freelance nonfiction writing, ghost writing, and other forms of work-for-hire for print and electronic media. This course will include collaborative classroom practicum experiences and lectures from professionals in the field, with some practical writing assignments such as pitch and query letters throughout the course. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG470.
Prerequisite: ENG102, ENL 102, ENG102E, ENL102ESL, ENG103, ENL 103, ENG106H, or ENL106H and at least one course at the 200-level or permission of the chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

Study will focus on the principles and practices of modern dramaturgy. Characters, story, plot structure, and dialogue will be discussed and analyzed in contemporary works, and in the developing work of students. The objective of the course is eventual publication. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG404.
Prerequisites: ENL 220/320, 321, 322, or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

A workshop course in writing essays, ranging from the strictly personal to the more objective, from brief journalistic pieces to more developed forms. classes will involve open discussion of students' writing and sharing of lessons derived from professional essayists. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG409.
Prerequisites: ENL 220/320, 321, 322, or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

A workshop courses centered on fiction intended for eventual publication. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG410.
Prerequisites: ENL220/320, 321, 322, or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

A workshop course centered on poetry intended for eventual publication. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG413.
Prerequisites: ENL220/320, 321, 322, or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

A study of the literature of the Romantic Movement from 1780-1832 with emphasis on such major poets as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG445.
Prerequisite: ENG102, ENL 102, ENG102E, ENL102ESL, ENG103, ENL 103, ENG106H, or ENL106H and at least one course at the 200-level or permission of the chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

Through discussion and lecture the student examines the development of American literature in its social and historical context from the Puritan era to 1800. Three lecture hours per week and two required field trips to Salem and Plymouth. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG455.
Prerequisite: ENG 102, ENL 102, ENG102E, ENL102ESL, ENG103, ENL 103, ENG106H, or ENL110H and at least one English course at the 200-level or permission of the chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

A survey of literature of the first half of the nineteenth century, focusing on the works of such writers as Irving, Cooper, Sedgwick, Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman and Dickson. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG456.
Prerequisite: ENG102, ENL 102, ENG102E, ENL102ESL, ENG103, ENL 103, ENG106H, or ENL106H and at least one course at the 200-level or permission of the chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

A survey of late Nineteenth-Century American literature, focusing on the works of writers such as Howells, James, Twain, Chopin, Jewett, Chesnutt, and Freeman. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG457.
Prerequisite: ENG102, ENL 102, ENG102E, ENL102ESL, ENG103, ENL 103, ENG106H, or ENL106H and at least one course at the 200-level or permission of the chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

A study of the Naturalistic movement in American literature, with emphasis upon Naturalism as both philosophy and literary style. Readings include such writers as Crane, Norris, Dreiser, Sinclair, and Wharton. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG461.
Prerequisite: ENG102, ENL 102, ENG102E, ENL102ESL, ENG103, ENL 103, ENG106H, or ENL106H and at least one course at the 200-level or permission of the chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

A study of selected American writers from the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG450.
Prerequisites: A W-I course and at least one English course at the 200-level or above.

Credits: 3.00

A survey of Russian literary works of such writers as Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Chekhov. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG492.
Prerequisites: A W-I course and at least one English course at the 200-level or above.

Credits: 3.00

A selected study of innovations in fiction from 1950 to the present including works by such writers as Hawkes, Robbe-Grillet, Duras, Nabokov, and Updike. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG463.
Prerequisites: A W-I course and at least one English course at the 200-level or above.

Credits: 3.00

A survey of major plays including those by such writers as Shaw, O'Casey, Synge, Beckett, Osborne, Stoppard, and Pinter. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credits for ENG438.
Prerequisite: ENG102, ENL 102, ENG102E, ENL102ESL, ENG103, ENL 103, ENG106H, or ENL106H and at least one course at the 200-level or permission of the chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

A consideration of plays and movements of the twentieth century. Emphasis on O'Neill, Miller, Williams, and Albee. Three lecture hours per week.
Not open to students who have received credit for ENG459.
Prerequisite: ENG102, ENL 102, ENG102E, ENL102ESL, ENG103, ENL 103, ENG106H, or ENL106H and at least one English course at the 200-level or permission of the chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

This course is an exploration of some of the significant problems and questions animating contemporary literacy theory. Topics may include: structuralism and post-structuralism, formalism, cultural studies, gender studies, critical race theory, Marxism and post-Marxism, queer theory and psychoanalysis.
Prerequisite: ENL161.

Credits: 3.00

This course offers an examination of specific topics in literacy theory, literacy criticism, and cultural studies. Three lecture hours per week. As permitted by the chairperson, it may be repeated for credit when the topic is different.
Prerequisites: A W-I course and at least one English course at the 200-level or above.

Credits: 3.00

Independent projects for students in the Honors program and others. Consent of the Department Chairperson required.
Prerequisite: A W-I course and at least one English course at the 300-level or permission of the chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

Combines instruction in current practices and theories in teaching composition and practical experience as a tutor in the Writing Skills Center. Course prerequisites, requirements, and application procedures are available in English Department Office. Enrollment is limited to ten. Limited to students recommended by faculty. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG502.

Credits: 3.00

Intensive work on a creative thesis guided by a faculty mentor.
Pre/Co-requisites: At least 9.0 credits from the following courses: ENL321, 322, 411, 412, 420, 421, 422, 423, 424.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

An internship designed to provide on-the-job training and work experiences relevant to the student's academic concentration in writing and/or literature. Time and service arrangements contracted between student, training site, and Department. Number of credit hours will vary with commitment, intern advisor's recommendation and Department Chairperson's approval. With specific permission of the Department Chairperson, may be taken for 3 credits as the English Department major Capstone Experience.
Prerequisite: ENG102, ENL102, ENG102E, ENL102ESL, ENG103, ENL103, ENG106H, or ENL106H, completion of at least 6 credits of English electives, and permission of the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 1.00 - 6.00

This course is an upper-level seminar designed to help students prepare portfolios that fulfill English Department requirements for the Capstone requirement option within the English major. Students will gather and polish written works for the portfolios and will receive extensive feedback from the instructor and peers on papers and projects produced during their careers in the English major that best represent the students’ trajectory and growth. In addition, students may rewrite selected papers and revise selected projects considering comments on the originals in order to demonstrate their ability to revise their work. Students may also create new projects of their choosing, as well as prepare a resume, a letter of application, and a digital portfolio accessible to graduate schools and potential employers. Three lecture hours per week. This course is required of students in the Professional Writing concentration, and it is not open to students who have received credit for ENG509. Prerequisite: completion of at least 6 credits of English at the 300 and/or 400 levels.

Credits: 3.00

This advanced level W-III course will examine a single topic of special interest in depth. Course will be devoted to literary analysis, discipline-specific writing conventions, research, and composing a seminar paper. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG497.
Prerequisite: W-I, W-II, and at least one English course at the 300-level or permission from the chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

This advanced-level W-III course will examine a single author in depth. Course will be devoted to literary analysis, discipline-specific writing conventions, research, and composing a seminar paper. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ENG 498.
Prerequisites: W-I, W-II, and at least one English course at the 300-level or permission from the chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

This course allows English majors to satisfy the final academic requirement for becoming a Commonwealth Honors Scholar and graduate as a member of the Commonwealth Honors Program. It is preceded by two 1.5-credit experiences (Honors Junior and Senior seminars) in which students work extensively with peers on topic invention and development. This capstone experience requires students to undertake a significant creative or research project in the discipline of English under the direction of a faculty member in the department. Three credit hours.
Prerequisites: W-II, IDS600H, consent of Commonwealth Honors Program Director, and permission of Department Chairperson.
Co-requisite: IDS 601H.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

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