Courses Offered in Geography | Salem State University Skip to main content

Geography

GPH 100P: Weather and Climate

This course analyzes the elements and controls of weather on the earth's surface including the extent and composition of the atmosphere, atmospheric heating and cooling, pressure and winds, moisture and precipitation. An introduction to weather forecasting techniques and a descriptive analysis of world climate regions.An introduction to global climate change, past, present, and analysis of possible future climate change. Introduction to maps and basic topics in physical geography. Three lecture hours and one two-hour laboratory per week. Satisfies the Scientific Reasoning (with laboratory) for the General Education Core. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR100P, GGR101P, or GPH 101P.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning Lab

GPH 105: Introduction to Geography

This course is designed to develop an understanding of the perspectives of geography, its evolution as a problem solving science, and its application to contemporary issues. Topics emphasizing spatial relations such as cultural perspectives, population dynamics the impact of economic development, social institutions and political organization are utilized. Case studies from around the world are used to increase the student's awareness of Geography. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR105.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society

GPH 105H: Foundations of Global Studies: People Places and Environment (honors)

As an introduction to geography, this course is designed to provide an overview of the different branches of geographic inquiry and thought to assist students in developing a critical awareness of the dynamic world in which we live, as well as to begin asking questions that seek to understand the spatial relationships between people, places and the environment. This course considers how the key concepts of place and space can be used to understand the special character and interactions of history, culture, economics, and the environment and will attempt to engage students' broad interests through the lens of geographical thinking and analysis.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society

GPH 110: World Regions

This course examines the interrelationships of the physical and cultural patterns of the world regions. Special attention will be given to various specific locations. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR110.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: World Cultures

GPH 115: Global Climate Change: Causes and Consequences

Global climate change is one of the dominant issues of our time. The earth's warming has already altered many ecosystems with marked results. This course studies these changes, their likely effects, and future scenarios. Students will consider the changes in the natural world and their impacts on societies around the world.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning

GPH 115H: Global Climate Change Honors

Global climate change is one of the dominant issues of our time. This course will provide a foundational understanding of climate change from the perspective of atmospheric science. The course will begin with an introduction into what climate change is and then explore past climate changes and how science is able to reconstruct the past. The course will explore how our current climate change is changing and what the driving forces of change are. Students will explore how a changing climate affects society in multiple ways and they will be introduced to various future scenarios of climate change. Students will also explore several mitigation and adaptation strategies for climate change. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning

GPH 140: Introduction to Maps and Geographical Information Systems

This introductory course is designed to provide a working knowledge of maps as a medium of communication and a general overview of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The cartographic component includes material on map components, history, and use. The GIS component includes historical background, field developments, current trends and future prospects in this rapidly expanding field. Basic methodologies and analytical functions of GIS will be introduced along with additional spatial and geographic concepts including the nature of spatial data, data capture and acquisition, data sources, spatial queries and spatial analysis. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR150.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Quantitative Reasoning

GPH 171: Environmental Sustainability and Society

This course applies geography's human-environment tradition to examine the regional and spatial dimensions of sustainability around the world. In pursuing sustainable development, humans seek to maximize the benefits of social and economic development while maintaining the services from and quality of the earth's natural resources. Students will explore case studies addressing some of the conflicts between human desires for material well being and our ability to protect the natural environment and maintain cultural and social traditions. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR275.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society

GPH 180: Saving the World- Social Justice in An Era of Climate Change

Recent years have seen an upsurge in global responses to the increasing threat of catastrophic climate change. This course explores this emerging global movement, with a particular focus on examining local and international responses, current policy debates and the future directions of the climate justice movement. Students will explore current news on climate issues, the impact and potential of climate activism, and debates around the radical political and policy changes that are necessary to avert a climate crisis. The course will develop students’ understandings and skills for participating in local solutions to the climate change. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society

GPH 220: Geography of New England

This course present New England, a relatively distinct cultural, economic and historical region, in terms of its physical features and the urban and rural economic structure with a view towards evaluating the future potential of the region. Three lecture hours per week. Field trips may be included. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR158.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 221: Geography of Canada

This course is designed as an introductory survey course on the geography of Canada. It will be structured around the five fundamental themes of geography (i.e. location, place, human-environment interaction, movement and regions). The course will analysis the physiographic, climatic, cultural, economic and political regions and patterns of Canada. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR159.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: World Cultures

GPH 222: Geography of the United States

This course provides a detailed regional analysis emphasizing the interrelationship of the physical, historical, economic and social geography of the United States. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR222.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society

GPH 229: Geography of the Caribbean and Middle America

This course explores the physical and cultural environment in Latin America and the Caribbean. It will examine the rich heritage of the regions' inhabitants, their cultural, economic and political life and the effects of climate and geomorphology on their culture. Students will also explore the cultural heritage and diversity of this region, and the region's role in the global economy. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR229.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: World Cultures

GPH 234: Geography of Europe

This course presents a detailed geography of Europe. Emphasis will be placed upon the geographic aspects of physiographic, social, economic, political, and cultural patterns. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR234.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 235: Geography of Africa

This course deals with the complexities of the human and physical environments of Africa. The role of European colonialism in the economic development of the continent is studied. Emergent nationalism in independent states and racial policies in several of the major political units are analyzed. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR235.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 237: Geography of the Middle East

This course concentrates on the southwest portion of the Middle East. The northern tier of states in Africa is also considered. The approach is largely cultural and historical, set within the political and physical framework. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR237.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: World Cultures

GPH 245: Cartography

This course is an introduction to the science of analytical map development employing computer cartographic technologies. Concepts stress data acquisition, spatial analysis, and data display coupled with theory of cartographic compilation and generalization to produce analytically useful maps. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR241.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 246: Parks and Protected Areas

This course analyzes the origins, types and purposes of protected areas as part of integrated resource and environmental management. The emphasis is primarily on North America but will also address parks and reserves at the global level. In addition to the physical environment of protected places, human interaction with the landscape will also be discussed. This course is not a "tour" of national parks but a study of the ideas and "place" of protected areas. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 247: Exploring Tourism Destinations

This course examines the dimensions of tourism from a spatial and regional perspective. Students will explore the economic opportunities created in tourist destinations and regions, will examine the means through which firms and entrepreneurs exploit such opportunities or location-driven competitive advantages, and will investigate some of the external economic forces that influence the viability of tourism destinations. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR365.
Prerequisite: GPH315 or GGR270.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 248: Ecotourism

This course introduces the concepts surrounding sustainable ecotourism development. The benefits and weaknesses of utilizing natural resources and wildlife as attractions and destinations will be discussed along with the importance of sustainability and environmentalism principles. Understanding how/why ecotourism is used as an economic development initiative globally is also considered. Students will develop writing skills through preparation of case studies and tourism analysis. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit or GGR367 or GPH363.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level II

GPH 251: Cultural Geography

This course examines the human imprint on the environment. Demographic, religious and language distributions are analyzed. Special topics such as local settlement landscapes may be included. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR204.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society

GPH 252: Native American Lands and Environments

This course will examine the cultural and political geography of Native Americans. It explores the lands and natural resources under Native American jurisdiction. Students will be introduced to the importance of law, legislation and federal policies in the changing geography of Native Americans. The course will also examine cultural differences in how American Indians and Euro-Americans think about land, natural resources and place. Case studies of reservation land use, hunting and fishing rights, environmental protection, sacred sites and tourism development will be used to explore the complex cultural and political geographies of Native Americans. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR248.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society

GPH 253: World Cities

This course provides an introduction to the form and function of cities in regions of the world. The role of culture, technological change, economic activities, physical geography and political and religious organizations in influencing form, function and architecture will be studied. Environmental impacts, ties to rural areas, globalization and the role of tourism in representative cities will be reviewed. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR160.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 261: Introduction to Travel and Tourism

This course provides an overview of the field of travel and tourism with an examination of the geographic, economic and cultural importance of travel and tourism. Topics will include reasons for travel, destination selections, travel modes, tourism development, and the role of the geographer. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR261.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society

GPH 264: Recreation Geography

This course analyzes recreation user patterns and the form, function, distribution and impact of recreation facilities. Topics include outdoor recreation, leisure communities, and spectator sports. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR211.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 282P: Global Environmental Issues

An introduction to the physical and human dimensions of global environmental change. The course will examine global elemental cycles and their interactions within the physical environment. In addition, human-driving forces will be analyzed such as land-use change and industrialization. Course will review use of remote sensing and GIS technologies for analysis of global and regional change. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR262P.
Prerequisite: Completion of lab science sequence or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 285P: Oceanography

This course describes and analyzes the morphology of ocean basins and their geological origins. The physical and chemical characteristics of seawater, the dynamics of oceanic circulation, and the role of the marine environment as a human resource are discussed. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR252P.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning

GPH 287P: Climatology

This course studies the nature and distribution of world climatic regions. Local and regional variations in general patterns are analyzed by means of selected data. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR351P.
Prerequisite: GGR100P or GPH100P or GGR101P or GPH101P or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 301: Introduction to Quantitative Geography

This course provides an introduction to probability, statistics and spatial data techniques used in geographic research and in analysis of data in geographic information systems. The course includes: the meaning and significance of numerical data, the analysis of central tendency and variance, sampling, data distributions, point and area spatial measurement and models, inferential statistics, correlation and regression. Three lecture hours per week. This course is a prerequisite for GPH 302.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Quantitative Reasoning

GPH 302: Geographic Research

This course prepares students for advanced research and departmental course work by examining the breadth of geography as an academic discipline, by understanding fundamental research techniques, by mastering basic computer skills and by developing and completing an original research project. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR205.
Prerequisite: GPH301 or GGR206.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

GPH 315: Economic Geography

This course provides an examination of economic activities on the earth's surface. Basic location theory precedes a discussion of selected activities in the primary, secondary, and tertiary sectors of the economy. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR270.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 317: Transportation Geography

This introductory course is designed to provide a general overview of the field of transportation geography. Transportation is a very geographic phenomenon and also a crucial component for all aspects of society today and in the past. In this course, transportation geography from a historical, urban, facility, international, intermodal, and sustainable perspective will all be examined. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: W-I course or equivalent.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level II

GPH 340: Geographic Information Systems

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are powerful forms of spatial information processing. Incorporating analytic geographic techniques to capture, maintain, analyze, and display data, GIS generate unique spatial information widely used by both the public and private sectors. Specifically, this course details the analytical and technical development and the applied uses of GIS for business, environmental, and social applications. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR320.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 343: Air Photo Interpretation

This course details the analytic use of various forms of aerial photography including manual interpretation, elementary photogrammetric techniques, mission design and planning, as well as integration and preparation of derived aerial photographic data for geographic systems analysis. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR342.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 344: Remote Sensing: Studying the Earth From Space

This course explores how scientists study the Earth from space using satellite data. The course covers the fundamental concepts of remote sensing from the physics of light energy and the mechanics of satellite imaging to the visual and digital analysis of satellite imagery for problem solving. The course uses a combination of lecture and computer applications. This course will provide students with the conceptual foundations and the technical skills to apply remote sensing for problem solving in earth science and environmental issues. Satisfies the Scientific Reasoning (non-laboratory) for the General Education core. The course has no prerequisites, but it is not advised as a course for freshmen. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR343.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning

GPH 346: Gis in Business and Community Development

Geographic information is increasingly relevant and often critical to businesses, organizations, governments and communities. A geographic information system (GIS) forms the basis for accessing geographic information, mapping, analysis, and decision making. This course emphasizes and ties together the key topics of GIS as they are used in business settings and community development.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 364: Special Events and Festivals

This course offers an introduction to the researching, planning, coordinating, marketing, management and evaluation of special events and festivals. This course content will explore the theories and practices relevant to successful event planning for host community residents and tourists.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 371: Environment Sustainability and Society

This course applies geography's human-environment tradition to examine the regional and spatial dimensions of sustainability around the world. In pursuing sustainable development, humans seek to maximize the benefits of social and economic development while maintaining the services from and quality of the earth's natural resources. Students will explore case studies addressing some of the conflicts between human desires for material well being and our ability to protect the natural environment and maintain cultural and social traditions. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR275.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society

GPH 373: Land Use Planning and Analysis

This course introduces the process of land use planning as it occurs in the United States. The history of American urbanization is examined especially as it relates to the development of the American planning system. Individual topics such as zoning, infrastructure planning, growth management economic development planning and environmental protection are all analyzed in this course. Three lecture hours per week. Group field trips may be substituted for some lectures. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR370.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 375: Food, Drink and the Environment

This course examines the geography of the global agro-food system. Students will learn about the economic, environmental and political factors shaping contemporary global and regional patterns of food production. The course explores the corporate consolidation of food production, processing, transport, marketing and retailing and the profound environmental, social and economic consequences of the global food system. The course also examines efforts to make the agro-food system more environmentally sustainable and socially just. We look at alternatives such as the local food movement, organic agriculture, slow food, community supported agriculture, farmers markets and other emerging agro-ecological models. The goal of the course is to provide a critical understanding of the global agro-food system and to explore debates over various alternatives and their viability. Three lecture hours per week. Environment Sustainability Concentration requirement, elective for others.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society

GPH 376P: Conservation of Natural Resources

This course emphasizes the complexities of managing renewable and non-renewable resources at various geographic scales, local to global. Scientific and social concepts pertaining to resource assessment and use are presented, as are conservation policies, programs, and practices. Problems associated with resource-user conflicts are also discussed. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR250P.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 377: Environmental Impact Assessment

This course is designed to introduce students to the applied field of environmental impact assessment (or EIA). A comprehensive framework for evaluating environmental impacts is presented. Requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act for preparing and writing environmental impact statements will be covered with materials from actual EIS's. Other environmental regulations to be covered include the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Endangered Species Act, and the Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act. The course provides students with a working knowledge of the EIA process. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR352.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 379: Environmental Justice

This course explores the issue of Environmental Justice in both domestic and international settings. Environmental Justice is the fair treatment of all people with respect to environmental politics and their implementations. A hallmark of environmental injustice is the persistence of geographic inequalities in the distribution of environmental burdens or amenities. Students will review major theories of justice and discrimination and apply these concepts to case studies. Students will explore the social and structural factors that contribute to environmental inequalities and the innovative solutions that communities are using to address these problems. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR357.
Prerequisite: W-I course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level II

GPH 400: Directed Study in Geography

This course is an independent study of a selected topic in systematic or regional geography with emphasis on intensive research and analysis. Subject to the approval of the study advisor and the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 1.00 - 6.00

GPH 402: Study-travel Seminar

This is an orientation course concerning selected geographic problems of a specific region followed by intensive field study in the area concerned. Focus will be on regions in the United States and selected foreign areas. Course repeatable with permission of the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00 - 6.00

GPH 410: Internship in Geography

This is an internship under the auspices of various public and private organizations involved in areas directly related to the student's academic interest in Geography or Cartography. Number of credit hours will vary with commitment. To register, students must meet departmental requirements and have Department Chairperson's approval on credit hours before registration.

Credits: 3.00 - 12.00

GPH 444: Digital Image Processing of Remotely Sensed Data

This course provides an investigation of the fundamentals of digital image processing as applied to remotely sensed data. This course includes study of the physics of light and the hardware systems used to record specific wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum. Laboratory and fieldwork are related to the digital analysis of LANDSAT and other imagery in a sequence of analytic processes common to problem solving. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to student who have received credit for GGR345.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 462: Exploring Tourism Destinations

This course examines the dimensions of tourism from a spatial and regional perspective. Students will explore the economic opportunities created in tourist destinations and regions, will examine the means through which firms and entrepreneurs exploit such opportunities or location-driven competitive advantages, and will investigate some of the external economic forces that influence the viability of tourism destinations. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR365.
Prerequisite: GPH315 or GGR270.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 463: International Perspectives in Tourism

This course examines the dynamics and structure of the global travel industry. Students will explore the forces shaping the present and future demand for travel, assess the strategies of travel suppliers and explore the changing role of travel agents, corporate travel firms, and travel industry entrepreneurs. Beyond an examination of the business of travel, students will also examine technological trends in transport and travel planning and will discuss the social and ecological impacts of the industry worldwide. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR363.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 476: Seminar in Geographic Concepts

This course is an interactive seminar designed to carry out research and exchange ideas regarding the communication of geographic concepts, especially in regard to geographic education. The course will examine selected concepts, techniques, and methods in light of case studies to prepare and present oral presentations, written reports, and lesson plans. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR356.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 500: Research Topics in Geography

Individual research topics in Geography are investigated under the supervision of Department faculty.
Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 875: Directed Study in Geography

The student will participate in an independent study of a selected topic in systematic or regional geography with emphasis on intensive research and analysis. Subject to the approval of two Department faculty, the sponsor and the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 876: Directed Study in Geography

The student will participate in an independent study of a selected topic in systematic or regional geography with emphasis on intensive research and analysis. Subject to the approval of two Department faculty, the sponsor and the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 900: Seminar in Geography

The seminar will be conducted by the graduate faculty of the department to stress research techniques and source materials in the various fields of geography. Additional major consideration will be given to the historical development of geographic thought from the period of the Ancient Greeks to the present. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 900.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 903: Geographic Information Systems

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are powerful and relatively new forms of spatial information processing used by business, industry, and government. GIS is a unique data base management system which incorporates analytic geographic techniques to capture, manipulate, analyze, and display spatial data. This course deals with the design and use of GIS an analytic tool stressing proper scientific method to ensure viable results. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 903.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 904: Geographic Information Systems for Research and Analysis

This course examines how GIS is used for research or analysis and provides students with an opportunity to improve GIS skills. Students review literature on major theories and methods of geographic inquiry, as well as case studies. Students develop a research question and plan, conduct GIS analysis, and communicate findings. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 904.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 909: Interpretation/analysis of Remote Sensing Imagery

The emphasis is on the study of remote sensing systems other than aerial photography. High altitude color-infrared photography - CIR, multi-spectral scanned imagery - MSS, side-looking airborne RADAR - SLAR, and thermal-infrared images - TIR, are investigated. The present and potential uses of these image products is studied with regard to academic and practical applications. Student mastery of the subject is exemplified by a series of detailed interpretive map overlays. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 909.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 910: Digital Analysis of Remotely Sensed Imagery

Investigation of the fundamentals of digital image processing as applied to remotely sensed data. Study of the physics of light and the hardware systems used to record specific wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum. Laboratory and field work related to the digital analysis of LANDSAT and SPOT imagery in a sequence of analytic procedures common to problem solving. Three lecture hours per week plus local field trips. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 910.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 942: Advanced Geographic Quantitative Methods

This course explores the use of linear and non-linear spatial multi-variate techniques as they relate to Geographic Information Science. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 942.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 945: Geographic Information System Project Implementation

This course prepares the student to develop, implement and maintain Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Students are exposed to GIS analysis and design employing a structured method approach. Further, the student is shown how to identify, track and correct system errors throughout the GIS implementation process. Students gain "hands on" experience by developing a GIS prototype. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 945.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 946: Computer Assisted Cartographic Modeling

This course presents concepts and applied uses of computer-assisted cartographic modeling. Topics include model development and implementation in applied environmental, demographic, and retail applications. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 946.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 952: Spatial Database Analysis and Design

This course introduces the student to the methods and techniques currently used in spatial data base design and analysis. The student gains proficiency in the structured method approach to analysis and design as applied to spatial data management and integration to the geo-computing environment. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 952.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 953: Seminar in Gis Application I

This course presents various applications in the use of GIS in Environmental and Automated Mapping and Facilities Management applications. Students are presented an opportunity to critically evaluate the applications and present solution to implementation problems. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 953.
Prerequisites: GGR943, GPH903 or permission of Instructor.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 955: Gis Practicum

Students will participate in a GIS project currently under development in a public and/or private agency. Students will develop a final report and present findings in a public forum. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 955.
Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor.

Credits: 3.00 - 4.00

GPH 960: Software Design and Programming in Gis

This course is a graduate-level introduction to programming for GIS graduate students. The fundamentals concepts of computer software design and programming will be introduced within the geoprocessing framework. Basic concepts of different programming paradigms will be presented with an emphasis on object-oriented paradigm. Students will develop skills in software design and programming techniques to explore, manipulate and model spatial data. Three lecture hours and extensive programming work outside of class.
Prerequisites: GPH952 or approval of the program coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

GPH 965: Seminar in Geographic Information Systems

To provide advanced study of specialized topics of importance to geographic information systems (GIS). Will include in-depth examination of scientific literature in an interactive seminar format concerning theoretical, applied and operational issues related to GIS and their development and applications. A substantial research paper on an approved topic is required for completion of the course. Course is required for students choosing the non-thesis option in the MS Geo-Information Science program and is recommended for students who intend to write a thesis. Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 965.
Prerequisites: GGR945 and at least 23 other graduate credits towards the MS Geo-Information Science degree.

Credits: 4.00

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