Courses Offered in Social Work | Salem State University Skip to main content

Social Work

SWK 101: The Profession of Social Work

This course examines the role of the social worker in addressing the needs of individuals, families, groups and communities. Special emphasis is placed on the values and ethics that inform and guide social work practice. Students examine the relationship between situations involving individuals, families, organizations and communities, and the role of the social worker in those situations. The course highlights a variety of community services and specifies how social workers in those settings address human needs.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 102: Social Welfare Past and Present

This course examines the function of social welfare in society from various perspectives. Particular attention is paid to the evolution of the US social welfare system and its relationship to important social issues, including poverty and wealth. Social welfare is studied from a policy perspective, and students are given the tools for beginning social policy analysis. Students develop and articulate perspectives on social welfare and examine their own values concerning human need.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 200: Social Services Volunteer Practice

This course provides students with a real-life exposure to social work and helps students test their own interest in working in the helping professions. Through structured volunteer and course work, students acquire knowledge and skills related to social work professionalism, communication, practice, agencies, and values.
Prerequisite: SWK101 or SWK102.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 261: Human Behavior and the Social Environment I

This is one of two courses which consider the interface between behavioral/psychological processes and the social environment out of which they grow. Emphasis is given to systems theory, group dynamics, organizational and community processes. The course draws linkages between this content and the provision of social services to individuals, families, groups, and communities by social workers based in organizational settings.
Prerequisites: SOC110.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 270: Understanding Diversity and Culture Competence in Human Services

The purpose of this course is to explore the meaning and implementation of culture competence in a social work context. Various aspects of human and social diversity will be explored, including but not limited to race, ethnicity, social class, and gender. The psychological and institutional cause and consequences of discrimination and oppression on a wide-range of populations are analyzed. Strength-based strategies for interacting with clients in human service agencies who have been victims of oppression and discriminatory policies are discussed. Readings, class discussions, and experiences aim to assist students in developing culturally competent social work values and techniques. Required of all Social Work majors and minors. Prerequisites: SOC201 and PSY101 or approval of Department chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 301: Generalist Practice I

The first of a two-semester sequence preparing students for generalist practice guided by the values and ethics of the social work profession. Included are the beginning stages of the problem-solving process, relationship building, interviewing, data collection, and assessment with individuals, families, small groups, organizations and communities. Three lecture hours per week plus videotaping. Required of and open only to Social Work majors.
Prerequisites: Junior status; 2.7 average on whichever of the following courses the student has taken: SWK101, SWK102, SWK200, SWK261, and SWK270.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 302: Generalist Practice II

The second of a two-semester sequence preparing students for generalist practice guided by the values and ethics of the social work profession. Included are goal setting and the planning, intervention and evaluation skills and strategies used with individuals, families, small groups, organizations and communities. Three lecture hours per week plus videotaping. Required of and open only to Social Work majors. Not open to students who have received credit for SWK300.
Prerequisite: A grade of B- or better in SWK301.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 305: Social Work Practice I

This course is the first of a three semester sequence introducing students to generalist social work practice guided by professional values, ethics and theories of social action. Included are beginning skills related to the planned-change process, interviewing, data collection, and assessment with individuals, groups, and communities. There are three lecture hours per week plus videotaping. This course is required of and open to only Social Work majors. Prerequisites: Junior status, 2.7 average in SWK101, SWK102, SWK200, (or SWK510) SWK261 and SWK270, and successful completion of the social work department’s professional readiness process.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 325: Developmental Disabilities in a Social Work Context

This course examines the theoretical, social, political and social work practice aspects of working with people with disabilities, with emphasis on developmental disabilities (DD). Focus is on delivery systems serving people with DD and issues involved in social work practice with this population. Particular attention is paid to the at-risk status of persons with DD. Students use various strategies to clarify their personal potential to work with persons with disabilities. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 330: Feminist Perspectives in Social Work Practice

This course focuses on gender and social work, beginning with a critical examination of the concept of feminist practice, with attention to oppression, power and privilege in helping relationships and in women's lives more broadly. The course looks at the intersections of women's lives and explores the complexity of identities based on race/ethnicity, class, sexuality, age, and ability in the lives of women and children, mental health and addictions, aging, criminal justice, and disability.
Prerequisites: junior standing and PSY101 or SWK101 or SOC110

Credits: 3.00

SWK 333: Poverty: Implications for Social Services

The course deals with theoretical perspectives on poverty, including its extent and causes in our society: e.g., institutional and social policy issues, racism, sexism, political-economic issues. The course also explores individual, group and system-wide change strategies for dealing with poverty. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 335: Social Policy: Theory and Analysis

This course focuses on the knowledge and skills needed for the macro component of generalist social work practice. Students develop skills in social welfare policy research analysis and evaluation and gain experience in preparing and presenting a policy position, both orally and in writing. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for SWK410. Prerequisites: SWK102, SWK261.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 342: Systems of Care for Child Welfare

The Systems of Care (SOC) approach has been implemented by a variety of human services systems because of its potential to support efforts to improve these systems in ways that lead to better services and more positive outcomes for individuals and families. This course will focus on skill building in areas such as writing, public speaking, and family assessment as related to utilizing the SOC perspective to improve outcomes for children and families involved in the child welfare system. Students will be able to define the SOC framework and guiding principles; demonstrate the ability to apply SOC principles to child welfare practice; be able to identify the SOC infrastructure needs of their respective communities; and demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively to provide services to children and families under a SOC framework. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: SWK101, SWK102.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 361: Human Behavior & the Social Environment II

This course is one of two courses which consider the interface between behavioral/psychological processes and the social environment out of which they grow. The ecological perspective provides an integrating model for foundation material from biology, psychology, sociology, and social work theory. This course emphasizes individual and family development models within social environments of communities and culture. The course draws linkages between this content and the provision of social services to individuals, families, groups, and communities by social workers based in organizational settings.
Prerequisites: W-I course, PSY 101, SOC 201.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level II

SWK 373: Selected Topics in Social Work

This three-credit course offers advanced students the opportunity to develop increased knowledge, skills, and competencies in selected areas of social work practice. The topic will be announced in advance. Topics vary based on current events, student interest, and faculty expertise. Provided the topic area covered is different, this course may be repeated one time for credit.
Prerequisites: Junior status and completion of all 100-level and 200-level social work courses or permission of department chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 381: Social Work Research Methods I

This course provides an introduction to the general principles of research methods in social sciences with a particular emphasis on the use of research findings to improve practice, policy, and social service delivery. Students become familiar with basic quantitative and qualitative research and are able to critique relevant literature. A plan to incorporate critically appraised information into current social practice is developed. Required of and open to Social Work Majors in the fall semester of the junior year. In order to complete the research sequence, students must successfully complete SWK 381 in order to enroll in SWK 382. This course is not open to students who have taken SWK 380. Prerequisite: Completion of the Basic College Mathematics Competency Requirement.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 382: Social Work Research Methods II

This is the second of a two-course sequence that focuses on basic research methods and concepts used in building knowledge for social work practice. The course builds on knowledge and skill for social work research covered in SWK 381, including the application of data analysis and statistical techniques, as well as writing and distribution of results. In addition, the ethical and human diversity issues associated with data gathering are considered. Required of and open only to Social Work Majors in the spring semester of the junior year. In order to complete the research sequence, students must successfully complete SWK 381 in order to enroll in SWK 382.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 385: Social Services in Mental Health Settings

This course offers a broad introduction to social work in the field of mental health including work in institutional and community-based settings. Major policy considerations in the delivery of mental health services are addressed as well as a variety of intervention strategies. A major emphasis is on the social worker's role in the mental health field and as a member of an interdisciplinary team with other mental health professionals. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: Junior/Senior status.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 395: Social Work and the Elderly

This course examines the status of the elderly and the special problems they confront in our society. It focuses on social agencies and other service resources for the elderly and analyzes those policies which most affect their lives. Students are encouraged to develop sensitivity to factors involved in the aging process and to develop the attitudinal self-awareness necessary for empowering elderly clients. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 404: Field Education I

The student is placed in a social work agency or institution under the supervision of a qualified social worker for a minimum of 425 hours of professional practice over both courses. The educational quality of the field experience is assured by a faculty person who maintains a liaison relationship with the agency. Required of and open only to Social Work majors. Offered on a continuing basis both semesters. Field Education Seminar I (SWK406) accompanies this course and must be taken concurrently with Field Education I. In order to pass one course, the student must also pass the other course.
Prerequisites: A grade of B- or better in SWK302.
Co-requisite: SWK406.

Credits: 5.00

SWK 405: Field Education II

The student is placed in a social work agency or institution under the supervision of a qualified social worker for a minimum of 425 hours of professional practice over both courses. The educational quality of the field experience is assured by a faculty person who maintains a liaison relationship with the agency. Required of and open only to Social Work majors. Offered on a continuing basis both semesters. Field Education Seminar II (SWK407) accompanies this course and must be taken concurrently with Field Education II. In order to successfully pass one course, the student must also pass the other course.
Prerequisites: SWK404 and SWK406.
Co-requisite: SWK407.

Credits: 5.00

SWK 406: Field Education Seminar I

The goals of the seminar are to reinforce and synthesize social work values, concepts, principles and skills learned in the classroom and the field work experience. Students are expected to do special readings and assignments as well as share with their peers the knowledge they gained from their field work experiences. One seminar session of 1 1/4 hours per week. Required of and open only to Social Work majors. Offered on a continuing basis both semesters. Field Education I (SWK404) accompanies this course and must be taken concurrently with Field Education Seminar I. In order to pass one course, the student must also pass the other course.
Co-requisite: SWK404.

Credits: 1.00

SWK 407: Field Education Seminar II

The goals of the seminar are to reinforce and synthesize social work values, concepts, principles and skills learned in the classroom and the field work experience. Students are expected to do special readings and assignments as well as share with their peers the knowledge they gained from their field work experiences. One seminar session of 1 1/4 hours per week. Required of and open only to Social Work majors. Offered on a continuing basis both semesters. Field Education II (SWK405) accompanies this course and must be taken concurrently with Field Education Seminar II. In order to pass one course, the student must also pass the other course.
Prerequisites: SWK404 & SWK406.
Co-requisite: SWK405.

Credits: 1.00

SWK 410: Social Policy: Theory and Action

The knowledge and skills needed for the macro component of generalist social work practice are the focus of this course. Skill in social welfare policy research analysis and evaluation is developed and students gain experience in preparing and presenting a policy position both orally and in writing. Students take this course concurrently with field work in order to examine policy relevant to their field experience. Adjustments are made for block field work students. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for SWK335.
Prerequisite: SWK361.
Co-requisite: SWK404 or SWK405.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

SWK 420: Social Work Intervention With Groups

This course presents basic theory and concepts of small group dynamics. It examines the role of the social worker as group facilitator in a variety of settings. The course provides students with the opportunity to discuss the dynamics of facilitating group process within family, neighborhood and community groups. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 450: Child Abuse and Neglect: Emotional, Social, Legal, Interventive Aspects

This course offers a conceptual framework for understanding the dynamics of child abuse and neglect. It examines the historical, legal, policy, treatment and prevention issues concerning child abuse and neglect. The course methods consist of lectures, films, role play, case studies and guest lecturers. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 455A: Services and Treatment for Substance Abuse

This course is designed to provide a broad range of practical and theoretical information about substance abuse as a major problem in our society. Students examine and evaluate the use and abuse of alcohol and drugs, the causes of substance abuse and methods of prevention, recognition and treatment. Special effort is directed toward the development of skills and expertise in dealing with alcohol and drug problems. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: SOC201 or PSY101.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 475: Social Services for the Adolescent

This course focuses on adolescent needs and development in the context of social service delivery systems. Private and governmental service delivery systems and programs are delineated. Successful therapeutic techniques and strategies for working with adolescents are covered. A wide range of adolescent problems are discussed and the structures set up to address them are explored. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 510: Directed Study in the Generalist Approach

Enrollment limited to students with considerable volunteer or employment experience in the social services and who can provide required supporting documents from a social service agency. Students must meet initially with the Department Chairperson of the School of Social Work. The directed study focuses on facilitating the students' analysis of previous social service experience within the framework of the generalist approach in social work. A substantial paper is required. This course may substitute for SWK200, Social Services Volunteer Practicum.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 515: Directed Study in Social Work

The student studies in depth some aspect of social work under the direction of a faculty member from the School of Social Work. The course requires a research paper and periodic meetings with the faculty member. The course may be repeated for an additional three credits in exceptional cases and with the approval of the Department Chairperson. Open only to Juniors and Seniors majoring or minoring in Social Work. Occasional exceptions are made with the approval of the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 700: Human Behavior and the Social Environment

This Human Behavior and Social Environment (HBSE) course provides a theoretical and conceptual foundation for understanding the behavior and development of individuals, families, and small groups. The course aims to expand and deepen students' knowledge of the complex interplay of biological, psychological, social, cultural, and environmental forces in the development and functioning of micro systems. Prerequisite: Admission to MSW Program or permission of Instructor and MSW Program Coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 703: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives On Social Work and Social Welfare Policy

This course provides a basis for the formulation and analysis of social welfare policy and services with special emphasis on the differential impacts these policies have on vulnerable populations. This course will familiarize the student with key principles of social policy analysis and engage him or her in the processes involved in policy making, implementation, and evaluation. These skills will enable the student to become a knowledgeable critic and formulator of improved social welfare programs at the national level and within the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.
Prerequisites: Admission to MSW program or permission of MSW instructor and MSW Coordinator

Credits: 3.00

SWK 704: Assessment & Intervention With Individuals, Families & Groups I

This course represents the first of two consecutive "foundation year" practice courses. The course is structured around the phases of the helping process which include; engagement, assessment, contracting, intervention, evaluation and termination. The course begins by delineating the central, unifying theoretical perspectives used to guide social work practice which includes generalist, strengths and ecological perspectives. The course also explores and integrates the values and ethics of the social work profession.
Prerequisites: Admission to MSW Program or permission of instructor and MSW program coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 705: Assessment & Intervention With Individuals, Families, and Groups II

This practice course represents the second of two "foundation year" practice semesters. This semester has an emphasis on couple, family, and group systems. Knowledge and skills gained from the first of the two sequence course are transferable and integrated into course sessions. Utilizing a variety of theoretical approaches, students will be able to shape assessments and interventions that are client centered. This course concludes by addressing the process of becoming a professional social worker.
Prerequisites: SWK704 or permission of Instructor and MSW Program Coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 706: Community Practice and Social Change

This course is designed to build on generalist practice themes focused on in SWK 705. It presents an examination and application of the role of the social worker engaged in social change through community organization and planning. The problem-solving model of social work practice is applied to the assessment and intervention challenges on the community level with particular attention to issues of diversity and the realization of client and citizen empowerment. Prerequisite: SWK 705.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 707: Research for Social Work Practice

This course will enable students to develop basic competencies in the integrated use of research in social work. Students will learn to interpret qualitative and quantitative research, conduct a literature review, understand the nature of evidence-based practice debates in social work practice arenas and develop a research proposal. Prerequisite or corequisite: SWK700.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 714: Introduction to Interprofessional Practice in Health Care Systems

This course is designed to introduce students to the principles and strategies of interprofessional practice in contemporary health care systems. The course curricula are designed to advance students' competent practice in interprofessional health care delivery. The course is open to matriculated graduate students in nursing, occupational therapy and social work as well as to non-matriculated students who hold a baccalaureate degree in one of these disciplines and whose undergraduate GPA is 3.0 or better.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 715: Human Diversity and Social Work Practice

This course examines how diversity characterizes and shapes the human experience, contributes to identity formation, and the extent to which social structures and values may create systems which marginalize and oppress particular groups while enhancing other groups' privilege and power. Diversity is examined through social construction and intersectionality frameworks that acknowledge the multiple dimensions of diversity related to age, class, color, culture, disability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, race, religiion, sex, and sexual orientation. Prerequisite: SWK700.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 721: Field Education I and Integrated Seminar I

The foundation year graduate field education placement and seminar provides an opportunity for the foundation year graduate student in field practice to integrate theoretical constructs and information gained in the classroom with the experiential component gained in the field setting. Seminars are led by the student's faculty field liaison and meet once a month. The intent is to operationalize the generalist approach to practice through the living laboratory of field education and to further the development of a reflective professional social work identity. Prerequisite or corequisite SWK 705.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 722: Field Education II and Integrated Seminar II

The foundation year graduate field education placement and seminar provides an opportunity for the foundation year graduate student in field practice to integrate theoretical constructs and information gained in the classroom with the experiential component gained in the field setting. Seminars are led by the student's faculty field liaison and meet once a month. The intent is to operationalize the generalist approach to practice through the living laboratory of field education and to further the development of a reflective professional social work identity. Prerequisite: SWK721. Prerequisite or corequisite: SWK 706.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 735: Assessment of Psychosocial Pathology

The Assessment in Psychosocial Pathology course focuses on the methods and criteria used in making differential decisions about mental health diagnoses, and introduces students to the application of the most commonly used diagnostic system, the DSM V. Students will also be introduced to a competency based model of assessment which takes into account the social, biological, psychological and strengths of individuals. Ethical issues and limitations related to current diagnostic systems will be discussed. Prerequisite: SWK700.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 760: Social Work Practice With Immigrant and Refugee Families: Issues, Challenges, and Resiliency

This course will provide graduate students with knowledge and skills in working with immigrant and refugee individuals, families, groups, and communities in the United States in a variety of human service settings. This course includes an introduction to the historical, social, and psychological processes that impact upon immigrant and refugee children, individuals, and families. The impact of immigration and processes of socialization, acculturation, and assimilation on parenting and children will be explored. Pre-requisite: SWK 700 or by instructor permission.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 796: Seminar: Human Behavior and the Social Environment

This HBSE/Practice Summer Seminar (SWK 796) is designed specifically for Advanced Standing students in order to review and synthesize concepts, theories, and practice methods pertinent to a generalist social work perspective. This course is to be taken in sequence followed by SWK 797. The seminars incorporate conceptual understanding and practice principles for social work practice with individuals, families, small groups, and communities. The goal is to prepare students for the MSW Program's Advanced Generalist Concentration Curriculum. Prerequisite: Admission to the MSW Advanced Standing Program.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 797: Seminar: Social Work Practice

This HBSE/Practice Summer Seminar (SWK 797) is designed specifically for Advanced Standing students in order to review and synthesize concepts, theories, and practice methods pertinent to a generalist social work perspective. this course is to be taken following SWK 796. The seminars incorporate conceptual understanding and practice principles for social work practice with individuals, families, small groups, and communities. The goal is to prepare students for the MSW Program's Advanced Generalist Concentration Curriculum. Prerequisite: SWK796.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 798: Advanced Standing Field Education I and Integrated Seminar I

The course provides the Advanced Standing student an opportunity to integrate classroom learning with experiential components. Seminars meet for 3 hours during alternate weeks of the Summer Sessions. Concomitantly, students are in experienced field learning centers for 16 hours weekly under the supervision of experienced Field Instructors. Seminars provide additional integration of course work and practice experiences and enhance students' knowledge and skill base through peer challenge, presentation, and sharing experiences. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SWK 797.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 799: Advanced Standing Field Education II and Integrated Seminar II

This course provides the Advanced Standing student an opportunity to integrate classroom learning with experiential components. Seminars meet for 3 hours during alternate weeks of the Summer Sessions. Concomitantly, students are in experienced field learning centers for 16 hours weekly under the supervision of experienced Field Instructors. Seminars provide additional integration of course work and practice experiences and enhance students' knowledge and skill base through peer challenge, presentation, and sharing experiences. Prerequisite or corequisite: SWK 797.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 802: Human Behavior & the Social Environment: Health & Mental Health

This course promotes a holistic orientation to the assessment and understanding of the complexity of bio-psychosocial human functioning in cultural contexts, and explores the diverse array of possible interventions. The course is designed to enable students to research and critically analyze the existing knowledge base in the health and mental health fields, and to apply their understanding to social work assessment and intervention. Prerequisites: SWK 722 or 797.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 804: Human Behavior Theory in Child and Family Services

Human Behavior Theory in Child and Family Services is designed to deepen and extend students' knowledge of biological, psychological, relational, cultural, economic and social dynamics that influence individual and family development, and risk and resilience among children and families. Prerequisite: SWK 722 or SWK 797.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 808: Human Behavior Theory: Older Adults and End-of-life-care

This course is designed to familiarize students with the biological, social and psychological aspects of the aging process, life threatening illness, death, grief, and bereavement. It seeks to integrate knowledge from various phases of the field of gerontology and end-of-life care in order to create an understanding of the relationship between the internal and external forces experienced in the process of aging and end-of-life over the life cycle and across cultural contexts. Prerequisite: SWK 722 or SWK 797.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 810: Advanced Clinical Assessment and Intervention

Students are expected to develop advanced practice skills for the disciplined use of various paradigms for direct clinical intervention with individuals and families. They are challenged to develop the capacity to appropriately choose and implement the major practice frameworks available to them as they address the needs of vulnerable groups. Students learn to empirically base their practice by evaluating their direct practice activities. Prerequisite: SWK 722 or SWK 797.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 820: Agency Management and Leadership Practice

This course is designed to prepare advanced generalist practitioners to assume middle management leadership positions and engage in the facilitation of change in contemporary human service practice. It provides an introduction to the processes and practices involved in program development, organizational management, program advocacy, and sound administrative social work practice. It extends student competence in the differential selection of group process, organizational analysis, and change models that address the strengths in organizations and agencies. Prerequisite: SWK 810.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 821: Social Work Intervention With Families

This course builds upon the knowledge and skills acquired in social work practice, human behavior and field courses regarding family functioning and interventive approaches. It addresses a broad range of interventions designed to assist families through therapeutic, supportive, educational and skill-building methods, and to link families with needed resources.
Prerequisites: Admission to the MSW Program or permission of the instrucotr and MSW Program Coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 833: Child, Youth and Family Policy

Building on policy analysis skills acquired in previous two policy courses, this course prepares students for generalist practice in child, youth and family welfare by deepening the student's substantive knowledge of participation in the policy-making process through legislative and/or administrative advocacy. Prerequisite: SWK804.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 835R: Social Work and the Law

This course provides a basic understanding of the roles of the different branches of government in making and interpreting law. The role of the courts and their importance in substantive areas of social work practice are examined. The role of social workers in the legal system is studied.
Prerequisites: Admission to the MSW Program or permission of the Instructor and MSW Program Coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 841: Field Education III & Integrated Seminar III

Concentration year field education and integrated seminars are geared to the advanced development of social work knowledge, values and skills to a specialized area of advanced generalist practice. Academic theory mastered in the foundation year and contained in concomitant courses in Practice, Human Behavior and Policy is reinforced and further integrated. The goal of both semesters is to provide practicum experiences where students have the opportunity to develop, reinforce, and refine competencies through performance. Prerequisite or corequisite: SWK 810.

Credits: 4.00

SWK 842: Field Education IV & Integrated Seminar IV

Concentration year field education and integrated seminars are geared to the advanced development of social work knowledge, values and skills to a specialized area of advanced generalist practice. Academic theory mastered in the foundation year and contained in concomitant courses in Practice, Human Behavior and Policy is reinforced and further integrated. The goal of both semesters is to provide practicum experiences where students have the opportunity to develop, reinforce, and refine competencies through performance. Prerequisite or corequisite: SWK820.

Credits: 4.00

SWK 844: Death, Dying, Grief & Bereavement Across the Life Span

This survey course explores death, dying, life and living, from student and client perspectives. The material focuses on illness, care giving, the dying process, and grief and bereavement across the life span. In addition, the impact of gender, culture, religion, etc. on the topics is considered. Finally, we examine the characteristics that allow us to survive if not thrive in the face of life's traumas and tragic events. YOU MAY NOT TAKE THIS COURSE IF YOU HAVE TAKEN 870R (SPECIAL TOPICS: OLDER ADULTS AND END-OF-LIFE).

Credits: 3.00

SWK 845: Mental Health Policy and Services

After a review of the historical background, current mental health policies and trends will be discussed, with a focus on Massachusetts state and local systems. General frameworks for mental health programming including various preventive strategies and methods of financing and administering these programs will be studied.
Prerequisites: SWK802.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 846: Health and Behavioral Health Policy and Services

Building on policy analysis skills acquired in the introductory policy course, this prepares students for practice in health care by deepening the student’s substantive knowledge of policies and services. Students engage in policy implementation analysis and learn how to participate in the policy-making process through legislative advocacy. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: SWK722 or 797.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 847: School Social Work Policy and Practice

This course prepares students to apply social work knowledge and skills in school settings through prevention, assessment, intervention and evaluation from an ecological, multi-level approach focused on students, families and the interprofessional practice in schools and communities. Prerequisite: SWK704 and 705. Required for students for SKW/SAC licensure. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 850R: Selected Topics: Children and Family Services

This course is designed to provide increased knowledge, skills, and competencies for work within the field of children and families. Topics vary according to students' interests and faculty expertise.
Prerequisites: Admission to MSW Program or permission of Instructor and MSW Program Coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 854: Policies and Services for Older Adults and End-of-life Care

The course examines policies and programs affecting older adults and end-of-life care, distinct but overlapping areas of social work practice. Issues explored include work, retirement, abuse and neglect, discrimination, cultural sensitivity and ethical challenges, disability, health care and insurance, home care and acute- long-term care, hospice and palliative care, economic security, living arrangements, guardianship, legal rights and protections, and advanced care planning. Prerequisite: SWK808.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 855: Designing Social Work Research

This course is the first half of a year-long applied research course during which students design a research project. Students will select a research topic, review relevant literature, construct data collection instruments or processes, prepare a research proposal and obtain approval from the relevant Institutional Review Board/s. Prerequisite: SWK722 or SWK797 or waiver examination.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 856: Conducting Social Work Research

This course is the second half of a year applied research course during which students conduct a research project. Students will collect data, analyze data using appropriate computer technology, submit a formal final paper and present their findings to the College community. Pre-requisite: SWK 855.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 860: Selected Topics: Health/mental Health Services

This course is designed to provide increased knowledge, skills, and competencies for work within the field of health and mental health. Topics vary according to students' interests and faculty expertise.
Prerequisites: SWK705 or SWK797 or permission of the Instructor and MSW Program Coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 862R: Substance Abuse

This course provides students with both macro and micro understanding of the phenomena of abuse of alcohol and other drugs nationally. The course emphasizes a complex systemic view of substance use and treatment which is grounded in the available addictions research, and consistent with a bio-psycho-social view of social work practice.
Prerequisites: Admission to MSW Program or permission of Instructor and MSW Program Coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 864: Short-term Models and Brief Interventions

This course is designed to supplement direct practice content. Students explore assessment and diagnostic concerns related to short-term practice models with adults, families and children. Course focuses on crisis intervention, cognitive-behavioral, brief couples and family intervention, and psychodynamic models.
Prerequisites: SWK705 or SWK797 or permission of Instructor and MSW Program Coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 865: Psychological Trauma: Assessment and Intervention in Social Work Practice

This elective will focus on the assessment, intervention and prevention of maladaptive responses of children, adolescents and adults who have been exposed to acute or chronic traumatic events and/or environmental situations. From the perspective of individual, family and community practice methods, emphasizing resiliency and empowerment, the course will introduce theoretical and practice issues to be considered in effective social work practice with this population.
Prerequisites: SWK705 or SWK797 or permission of MSW Program Coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 867: Disability in Human Services Policy & Practice

This course examines the historical, theoretical, social and political aspects of current U.S. policies and programs relevant to populations with disabilities, with the exception of populations with psychiatric disabilities. Targeted to graduate students in the human services, with a specific focus on social work students, the course examines key policy controversies, historic legislation, landmark court cases and sub-population-specific issues. A review of the service delivery systems in which policies and programs are implemented are also reviewed in preparation of direct practice with a spectrum of people with disabilities.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the MSW program or permission from the instructor or MSW Program Coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 868: Clinical Practice With Children and Adolescents

This elective course will concentrate on specific practice methods in assessment and direct work with children and adolescents in a variety of settings, including schools and child welfare systems. There will be a special emphasis on enabling students to develop a sound, coherent and articulated conceptual base for assessment and intervention with children and adolescents individually as well as in families, groups, and social systems. Prerequisite: SWK705 or SWK797 or permission of the instructor or MSW Program Coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 871: Social Work With Elders and Their Families

This elective addresses the experience of normal aging and the challenges associated with the transition into aging. Discussions include the role of family members in relation to the elderly family member, the impact of illness and disability on both elders and caregivers, and prevention and treatment of elder abuse.
Prerequisites: Permission of the MSW Program Coordinator; course intended for professionals working in relevant practice area.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 875: Directed Study in Social Work

This course is developed in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the work. The student chooses a topic that is not covered by other graduate elective course offerings. The proposal includes: name of faculty sponsor, rationale for taking the proposed course, specific number of contact hours with the sponsor, products of the course, and exact method of evaluation of student performance.
Prerequisite: SWK722 or SWK797 or permission of the MSW Program Coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

SWK 880R: International Travel and Seminar

This course involves travel abroad as well as pre and post-trip seminars. Students will engage with human services professionals in a host organization or university in a foreign country and gain comparative knowledge about social work practice, social service programs and policies, and critical human rights campaigns. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

Credits: 3.00

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