Courses Offered in Chemistry and Physics | Salem State University Skip to main content

Courses Offered in Chemistry and Physics

Chemistry and Physics

CHE 112: Introduction to Green Chemistry

This course introduces the theory, principles, and practices of green and environmentally benign chemistry. Green chemistry anticipates the superiority of preventing pollution at the design stage before it begins. The principles of green chemistry will be discussed to design creative ways to reduce hazardous waste and human impact on the environment, and perform chemistry in a better way. Emphasis will be given to analysis of a chemical reaction at the molecular level or an industrial chemical process by using green chemistry metrics and finding "greener" alternatives in the context of ecological sustainability, environmental health, economic welfare, and social justice. This course does not require any previous chemistry or science background, but a strong interest in environmental issues and a desire to find solutions to ecological problems is highly recommended. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Pers Growth & Responsibility

CHE 117: General, Organic and Biological Chemistry

This course is a systematic survey of measurements, scientific notation, atomic structure, periodic trends, chemical bonding, chemical calculations, acids and bases, and radioactivity. The course will also cover the nomenclature, structure, and reactions of organic compounds and biochemicals, including carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. Intended for health science and other non-chemistry majors. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning Lab

CHE 125: Chemistry of Life Processes

Required of B.S. in Nursing majors. A continuation of CHE 124. A systematic survey of the classes of organic compounds and biochemicals. The classes of organic compounds are distinguished by structure, common names, I.U.P.A.C. names, reactions and their uses. General and organic chemistry are used to discuss the structure, function, and metabolism of the carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. Three lecture hours and one two-hour laboratory period per week. For non-chemistry majors.
Prerequisite: CHE121 or CHE124 or the equivalent.

Credits: 4.00

CHE 130: General Chemistry I

This course covers descriptive and quantitative aspects of chemistry. Topics include states and properties of matter, atomic structure, chemical bonding, the mole, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and acid-base chemistry. A proficiency in algebra is recommended. Open to all students and designed for Chemistry, Biology, and Geological Sciences students. Three lecture hours, one hour of discussion and one three-hour laboratory per week.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Quantitative Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning Lab

CHE 131: General Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of CHE 130. Topics include equilibrium, electrochemistry, kinetics, nuclear chemistry and phase equilibria. This course emphasizes applications in environmental chemistry. Three lecture hours, one hour of discussion and one three-hour laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: CHE 130.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Quantitative Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning Lab

CHE 140: Introduction to Environmental Chemistry

This course investigates the chemical processes widespread in our environment: natural waters, earth and soil, and atmosphere. Chemical concepts such as reduction and oxidation processes, equilibria in aqueous solution, and reactions of hazardous inorganic and organic compounds will be covered. Specific topics will include: air pollution, the chemical basis of ozone depletion, global warming, acid rain, photochemical smog, natural resources and renewable energy, and water pollution and remediation. This course will also provide opportunities to the students to develop critical reasoning, effective literature survey strategies and presenting the results of a scientific term project in a professional formal. A background in algebra and physical sciences is recommended. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: Basic math competency.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning

CHE 212: Organic Chemistry I

Introduction to chemistry of carbon compounds. Survey of the principal classes of aliphatic and aromatic compounds and their reactions. The application of the techniques of synthetic organic chemistry to the preparation and purification of simple organic compounds is taken up in the laboratory. Required of Chemistry and Biology Majors. Three lecture hours, and one three-hour laboratory per week. This course, with CHE130 satisfies the full year sequence in a laboratory science.
Prerequisite: CHE130.

Credits: 4.00

CHE 213: Organic Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of CHE 212: Study of organic reactions with emphasis upon the relation between structure and reactivity. Introduction of IR and NMR theory in lecture and application in laboratory. Laboratory work includes the study of advanced preparations and techniques. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory period per week.
Prerequisite: CHE212.

Credits: 4.00

CHE 308: Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry

This course explores descriptive inorganic chemistry. The chemistry of the representative elements and the inner and outer transition elements will be studied. Topics include bonding, atomic and molecular structure, and chemical reactivity. The discovery and purification of these elements is covered as well. Special tropics include organometallic chemistry and bioinorganic chemistry. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: CHE130, CHE131, CHE212, CHE213.

Credits: 3.00

CHE 309: Biochemistry

An introduction to carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids, which will include metabolic pathways, the role of vitamins and detoxification mechanisms. The laboratory deals with enzyme kinetics and the solution of practical analytical problems using chromatographic, instrumental and wet chemical methods. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory period per week.
Prerequisite: CHE130, CHE131, CHE212, CHE213.

Credits: 4.00

CHE 321: Quantitative Analysis

This course deals with the fundamental principles of classical analysis and electrochemistry with specific emphasis on gravimetry, titrimetry, potentiometry, voltammetry and amperometry. The laboratory work includes the use of analytical balances, glassware and electronics in order to quantitate single constituents of mixtures gravimetrically, volumetrically, complexometrically and electrochemically. Three lecture hours and one four-hour laboratory period per week.
Prerequisite: CHE130, CHE131, CHE212, CHE213.

Credits: 4.00

CHE 340: Techniques in Inorganic and Organic Synthesis

This laboratory course explores advanced chemical synthesis. The laboratory experiments will focus on the synthesis and characterization of inorganic and organic compounds. The purpose of the course is to build on a student's experience in the laboratory through the use of new synthesis techniques and instrumentation applications. The use of specialized glassware and instruments such as the FT-IR, FT-NMR and UV-Vis will be a main part of the course. One lecture hour and two three hour laboratory periods per week.
Prerequisites: CHE130, CHE131, CHE212, CHE213.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

CHE 341: Physical Chemistry I

This course will cover quantum theory; molecular and atomic structure; vibrational, rotational and electronic spectroscopy, and statistical mechanics. Three lecture hours and one three hour laboratory per week. Not open to students who have received credit for CHE332.
Prerequisites: CHE130, CHE131, CHE212, CHE213, MAT220, MAT221, PHS211A or PHS221,PHS212A or PHS222.

Credits: 4.00

CHE 342: Physical Chemistry II

This course will cover chemical kinetics, the laws of thermodynamics, phase equilibrium, chemical equilibrium, and electrochemistry. Three lecture hours and one three hour laboratory per week. Not open to students who have received credit for CHE331.
Prerequisites: CHE130, CHE131, CHE212, CHE213, MAT221, PHS211A or PHS221, PHS212A or PHS222.

Credits: 4.00

CHE 419: Advanced Biochemistry

This course builds upon Biochemistry (CHE309). The focus of this course is the understanding of the enzyme catalyzed biochemical reactions and mechanisms relating to bioenergetics and metabolism. Topics may include glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, metabolic regulation, citric acid cycle, fatty acid catabolism, amino acid oxidation, oxidative phosphorylation, hormone regulation and biosynthesis of lipids, amino acids and nucleotides. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: CHE309 or BIO409.

Credits: 3.00

CHE 420: Instrumental Analysis for Clinical Chemists

This course will involve a study of the instrumentation, theoretical aspects and the application of physiochemical principles for the solution of analytical problems in the area of clinical chemistry. Ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence and phosphorescence, nephalometry and turbidimetry, flame photometry, atomic absorption spectroscopy, ion exchange, gas, liquid, and thin layer chromatographics, specific ion potentiometry, radiochemical methods, and kinetic methods of analysis will be discussed. The laboratory will involve detailed investigation of important clinical, analytical problems utilizing the above-listed techniques. Three lecture hours, one two-hour laboratory discussion and one two-hour laboratory period per week.
Prerequisites: CHE321 and PHS212A or PHS222.

Credits: 4.00

CHE 422: Instrumental Analysis

This course will involve the study of the theoretical aspects, chemical applications, and the instrumentation of the physiochemical principles that are the foundations of Instrumental Analysis. Topics covered will be the absorption, emission, and the scattering of various forms of electromagnetic radiation; the various forms of chromatography, mass to charge ratio, and the interaction of electricity with matter. The laboratory will involve practical chemical experiments (qualitative and quantitative) based on some of the topics covered in lecture. Three lecture hours and two three-hour laboratory periods per week.
Prerequisites: CHE321, CHE341, PHS212A or PHS222.

Credits: 4.00

CHE 441: Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

This course builds on Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry and Physical Chemistry. Topics include concepts of acids and bases; non-aqueous solvent systems; bonding and structure; molecular symmetry; solid state chemistry; coordination chemistry with an emphasis on ligand field theory, spectroscopy, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of coordination compounds; organometallic chemistry of mono and polynuclear metal carbonyl, alkyl and analogues. Catalysis and selected bioinorganic compounds will be covered briefly as well. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credits for CHE440.
Prerequisites: CHE308 and CHE341.

Credits: 3.00

CHE 560: Chemistry Seminar

This course provides scientific presentation experience, professional development, and a review of chemical concepts in the undergraduate curriculum. Students will develop an oral presentation from current topics in chemical literature and/or the results of individual research. The topics will be approved by Department members. Students will develop a professional resume and cover letter appropriate for a scientific job search. Student swill review chemical concepts from the undergraduate curriculum in preparation for taking standardized tests for advanced study in science or medicine, or for entry into the job market. Two class meetings per week.
Prerequisite: Senior standing as a Chemistry major or permission of the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 2.00

CHE 570: Directed Study in Chemistry

This course will consist of readings in particular areas of chemistry, under the direction of a staff member. Students wishing to register for this course must make prior arrangements with the faculty member involved. Cannot be taken for major credits in Chemistry. Open only to Junior and Senior Chemistry majors.
Prerequisite: Consent of the faculty member and permission of the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00

CHE 572: Chemistry Research I

This course provides qualified students with research direction and the opportunity to participate in independent work in any area of chemistry of special interest to them, provided that a faculty supervisor is available. A paper and poster presentation are required at the end of the course. Open only to Junior and Senior Chemistry majors.
Prerequisites: CHE321 and CHE341, consent of the faculty supervisor and permission of the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

CHE 573: Chemistry Research II

This course builds on CHE572, continuing with the same project or starting a new project. Students in this course will be expected to present their results in a professional setting.
Prerequisites: CHE342 and CHE572, consent of the faculty supervisor and the permission of the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

CHE 715: Chemisrty of the Elements

This course involves a detailed study of the physical and chemical properties of selected elements and their compounds. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the study of those inorganic chemicals of commercial, environmental and ecological significance.
Prerequisites: General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry and Physical Chemistry are recommended but not required.

Credits: 3.00

CHE 725: Topics in Organic and Biochemistry

This course will involve a study of select areas of organic and biochemistry. The structure of biochemicals, their reactions and the mechanisms of those reactions will be related to reactions of simpler organic compounds. The mechanism of action of toxic and therapeutic organic and biochemical compounds will be related to the field of Green Chemistry. Curriculum ideas for incorporating materials into the classroom will be discussed. Review and research articles from literature will be used extensively. Not open to students who have received credit for CHE720 or CHE740.

Credits: 3.00

CHE 733: Physics in Chemistry

This course will examine topics from thermodynamics, kinetics, and quantum chemistry. The topics will be selected from the current state frameworks for teaching high school chemistry and physics and focus on topics where the two disciplines overlap. In addition to studying various topics, demonstrations, laboratories, and lesson plans will be developed. Not open to students who have received credit for CHE731. Prerequisites: Physics I & II, General Chemistry I & II, or equivalent.

Credits: 3.00

CHE 755: Analytical Chemistry in the Middle/high School Laboratory

This course will involve a study of quantitative and qualitative chemical analysis and the application of these techniques for the middle/high school laboratory. Laboratory techniques, safety, equipment, and reporting will be discussed. Students will be expected to develop and present laboratories based on specific learning standards. 25 pre-practicum hours. Lecture and laboratory. Not open to students who have received credit for CHE750.

Credits: 4.00

CHE 900: Seminar

This course will require oral and written reports by the participants on current or recent chemical investigations that are published in the chemical literature. Required for the MAT in Chemistry.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the MAt in Chemistry Program.

Credits: 1.00

CHE 910: Research

A problem of an advanced nature requiring reading and chemical research in one of the following areas of Chemistry: Analytical, Biological, Inorganic, Organic or Physical. The candidate will select the area of interest, but a staff member of the Chemistry Department will supply the specific problem. A paper is required at the completion of the research. Admission to the course is open to students who have completed the chemistry core requirements in the MAT in Chemistry program and requires the approval of the faculty member under whose direction the research is to be done.

Credits: 3.00 - 9.00

PHS 101A: Physical Science I

Selected topics from physics, chemistry, & astronomy, will be explored with emphasis on the process of scientific investigation and the development of scientific concepts, reasoning skills, and mathematical modeling. Topics to be investigated may include properties of matter, the relationship between motion and energy, and energy conservation. No previous background in science is assumed. Together with PHS 102A or PHS 107, this course satisfies the full-year sequence in laboratory science. Three lecture hours, and one two-hour lab per week. Not open to students who have received credits for PHS 105 or PHS 101.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning Lab

PHS 107: The Physics of Music and Voice

Introduction to the fundamental concepts and techniques of acoustics, particularly as applied to the performing arts. Topics will include a description of waves and wave motion; frequency and pitch; interference, standing, waves, and resonance; intensity levels and loudness. The course will also explore the fundamentals of musical instruments, including stringed instruments, woodwinds, and percussion. Three lecture hours and one two-hour laboratory period per week. Together with PHS101A or PHS211A or PHS221 this course satisfies the Laboratory Sequence.
Prerequisite: PHS101A or PHS211A or PHS221.

Credits: 4.00

PHS 205: Digital Circuit Design

This course introduces logic design and digital circuit fundamentals. Topics include: binary systems, Boolean algebra, combinatorial and sequential circuit analysis and design, and fundamental building blocks of modern computers, such as multiplexers, decoders, counters and registers. Students are involved in hands-on laboratory activities and team projects to apply learned theory to the design, simulation and implementation of digital circuits using current computer aided-design software and hardware tools. Three lecture hours and three hours of scheduled laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: MAT220, or MAT 110 or equivalent.

Credits: 4.00

PHS 207: Astronomy

Introduction to topics in modern astronomy. Topics may include the origin and evolution of the solar system; the search for extra-solar planets; the lives and deaths of stars; the structure of the galaxy; modern theories of cosmology; and the search for extraterrestrial life. Emphasis on the latest results in research astronomy, from the perspective of the enthusiastic novice. Required periodic visual observations and visits to the Collins Observatory will supplement lectures. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: MAT110 or permission of the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

PHS 211A: College Physics I

An introduction to principles of classical mechanics, with emphasis on development of problem-solving skills. Topics include the relationship between force and motion, the conservation of energy and momentum, rotational motion, and simple harmonic motion. Algebra, geometry and elementary trigonometry are used freely. Three lecture hours, one discussion period and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Emphasizes biological science applications. Not open to students who have received credits for PHS 211.
Prerequisite: MAT 110 or equivalent.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning Lab

PHS 212A: College Physics II

This course examines additional topics in classical physics, including fluid dynamics; thermal properties of matter, the laws of thermodynamics; principles of electricity and magnetism; D.C. circuits, electromagnetic induction. There is a strong emphasis on problem solving skills, in which algebra, geometry and elementary trigonometry are used freely. There is an equally strong emphasis on developing an understanding of the underlying concepts, in which active participation in class is required. Three lecture hours, one discussion period and one three-hour laboratory period per week.
Prerequisites: MAT 110 or equivalent and PHS 211A or PHS 222.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning Lab

PHS 221: General Physics I With Calculus

Calculus-based survey of selected topics in classical mechanics, including kinematics and Newtonian mechanics; one-and two-dimensional collisions; energy conservation; rotational motion and angular momentum; harmonic motion and oscillations. Three lecture hours, one mandatory discussion hour, and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Cannot be taken for credit with PHS 211A. Not open to students who have received credit for PHS 213.
Prerequisite: MAT 110 or equivalent.
Co-requisite: MAT 220.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning Lab

PHS 222: General Physics II With Calculus

Continuation of PHS 221. Calculus-based survey of selected topics in classical electrodynamics and geometric optics, including electric fields & Gauss' Law; electric potential; D.C. circuits; magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction; the electromagnetic field, reflection and refraction of light. Cannot be taken for credits with PHS 212 or PHS 212A. Not open to students who have received credits for PHS 214.
Prerequisites: PHS 221 or PHS 213 and MAT 220.
Co-requisite: MAT 221.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning Lab

PHS 311: General Physics III

This course examines topics in electromagnetism and wave motion, including properties of waves; geometric optics; interference and diffraction of light; the electromagnetic spectrum and wave-particle duality. Selected topics in modern physics will be introduced as time permits. Three lecture hours, one discussion period, and one three-hour laboratory period per week.
Prerequisite: PHS212A or PHS212 or PHS214.

Credits: 4.00

PHS 312: Modern Physics

Introduction to the major developments in physics during the 20th Century. Topics include blackbody radiation and Planck's constant; the photoelectric effect, development of quantum theory, the structure of matter; particle physics and cosmology. Three lecture hours, one discussion period, and one three-hour laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: PHS311 and MAT221.

Credits: 4.00

PHS 315: Introduction to Radiation Physics

This course examines problems in radiation physics, including nuclear structure; radioactive decay and activity; uses of radioactivity; the interaction of radiation with matter; radiation detection and measurement; radiation dosimetry; biological applications and hazards of radioactivity. Intended for Nuclear Medicine Technologists. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites: PHS211A and PHS212A, or PHS221 and PHS222.

Credits: 3.00

PHS 570: Directed Study in Physics

This course will consist of readings in particular areas of physics, under the direction of a staff member. Students wishing to register for this course must make prior arrangements with the faculty members involved.
Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 1.00 - 6.00

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