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Psychology

PSY 101: General Psychology

This course introduces the student to the scientific study of the mind and behavior and to applications of psychological theory and research to everyday life. Topics covered include abnormal psychology, biological psychology, cognition, development, learning, personality, and social psychology. Students explore the nature of evidence in psychology, assess the value of theory in understanding contemporary social issues, and engage in systematic investigations of human behavior and mental processes. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for PSY103.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society

PSY 119: Exploring Careers in Psychology

This course will expose students to professional development issues within psychology. Through readings, assignments, and guest speakers, students will explore topics such as: ethics and values in psychology; informed decision-making about coursework; opportunities at the baccalaureate, masters and doctoral levels; allied professions; how to pursue and fund graduate study; careers in psychology and psychology’s value to other careers; and graduate school culture and expectations. Limited to psychology majors for free elective credit only. This course will be graded Pass/Fail. 1.5 lecture hours per week. 1.5 cr.

Credits: 1.50

PSY 170H: Honors: Foundations of Psychology

Tis course surveys core areas of psychology and the insights they offer into how and why human beings behave as they do. In a seminar setting, with fieldwork and library related activities, students will explore the major perspectives in psychology, examine the work of noted psychologists explore the nature of evidence in psychological science, and assess the value of psychology in understanding contemporary social issues. Students completing PSY101 or PSY103 cannot take this course for credit. Limited to Honors Program students, upon approval of the Instructor and Honors Coordinator. First consideration given to Freshmen Honors Program Psychology majors. Substitutes for PSY 101 in all curricula.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society

PSY 203S: Research Methods and Statistics I

This is the first of a two-course sequence (with PSY204R) integrating statistics and research methods in psychology. The course covers basic research design principles and descriptive statistics, and introduces the normal curve and the sampling distributions underlying inferential statistics. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week.
Prerequisites: Psychology major and minor status, PSY101, and satisfactory of the math competency requirement.

Credits: 4.00

PSY 204R: Research Methods and Statistics II

This is the second of a two-course sequence (with PSY203S) integrating statistics and research methods in psychology. The course covers more complex research designs and inferential statistical methods, including one-and two-way analysis of variance and selected non-parametric techniques. Students will design and conduct an independent research project. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: Psychology major or minor status and PSY 203S (or a grade of B- or better in CRJ 401 or NUR 409).

Credits: 4.00

PSY 210: Introduction to Learning

This course presents an overview of research in animal and human learning including topics in reflexive behavior, and classical and operant conditioning. Emphasis will be placed on behaviorism as a philosophy of science, reasoning about cause and effect, measurement and evaluation of behavior, evolutionary mechanisms, ethics and the application of learning (to both animal and human populations). Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: PSY101

Credits: 3.00

PSY 211: Introduction to Cognitive Psychology

Introduction to the study of perception, memory, thought, language, attention, and reasoning. Connections with other cognitive sciences, including linguistics, neuroscience, computer science, and philosophy of mind, will be explored. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: PSY101.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 212: Introduction to Biological Psychology

This course introduces basic neuroanatomy and neurophysiology and the methods of biological psychology, and explores the biological bases of psychological development, behavior, and behavior disorders. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: PSY101.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 215: Introduction to Abnormal Psychology

This course describes the various forms of abnormal behavior. It covers the etiology, development and treatment of the major psychological disorders. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credits for PSY302.
Prerequisite: PSY101.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 216: Introduction to Social Psychology

This course is an introduction to theory and research in social psychology, the scientific study of how people's thoughts, perceptions, feelings, and behavior are affected by others. Topics include perception of the self and others, attitudes and persuasion, conformity, compliance and obedience, altruism, aggression, social influence and group decision-making. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credits for PSY250.
Prerequisite: PSY101.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 217: Introduction to Personality Psychology

Personality psychology is the scientific study of the whole person and of individual differences. The course will survey major theories of personality. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credits for PSY303.
Prerequisite: PSY101.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 218: Childhood and Adolescence

This course stresses the interaction of biological, psychological, and social factors which affect the human organism from birth through adolescence. Various theoretical points of view, e.g. Freud, Piaget, Erikson, are presented. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credits for PSY206, PSY251 or PSY252.
Prerequisite: PSY101.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 251: Child Growth

This course is designed to provide students with an integrated exposure to child development. A broad theoretical background is combined with principles of application. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credits for PSY206 or PSY218.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society

PSY 252: Adolescent Psychology

This course provides the student with a broad theoretical and practical basis for the understanding of this dynamic period of development. Theoretical models are reviewed within the context of important issues of the adolescent experience. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credits for PSY206 or PSY218.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society

PSY 300: Health Psychology

This course in Health Psychology will examine the application of psychological principles and research in promoting and maintaining health and well-being and in preventing and treating illness. Working within bio-psychosocial and ecological frameworks, this course will explore how dynamic interactions between biological, psychological, social, environmental, economic, health systems, and health policy factors influence health and illness. Students will gain an understanding of how their own behaviors (e.g., diet, exercise, drug use, sexual behavior, exposure to environmental toxins) may affect their personal health outcomes, and impact their communities. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Pers Growth & Responsibility

PSY 321: Group Dynamics

This course will survey group theory, practice and research. Special attention will be given to group dynamics and processes, human relations training, organizational development, problem solving and leadership. The theoretical foundations of group psychotherapy and various methods of group counseling will be explored as they relate to individuals with physical and/or psychological disorders.
Prerequisite: PSY215 and at least three additional credits of courses numbered PSY 205 - 299.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 322: Adulthood and Old Age

This course follows the development of the human being beyond adolescence into adulthood and old age, examining the impact of biological, psychological, and social factors upon the aging process. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to student who have received credits for PSY207.
Prerequisite: PSY101.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 323: Attention and Memory

This course examines attention and memory from three perspectives: What do we know about attention and memory? What are some possible explanations of these phenomena? What are the practical and theoretical difficulties in studying attention and memory? Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: PSY211 and three additional credits of courses numbered PSY 205 - 299.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 324: Sensation and Perception

Sensation and perception are the processes through which humans and other animals extract information from the world. With an emphasis on vision and hearing, this course examines the physiology of sensation and the transformation of sensory impulses into meaningful perceptions. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: PSY211 and at least three additional credits of courses numbered PSY 200-299.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 325: Theories of Motivation

An analysis of the nature, origins, and development of motives. Current research trends are examined for their theoretical implications and historical antecedents. Emphasis is on concepts such as drive, arousal, emotion, and esthetics. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: At least six credits of courses numbered PSY 205 - 299.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 326: Industrial and Organizational Psychology

This course studies selection, training, motivation, morale, supervision, leadership and organizational development in business and industry. Emphasis is given to the psychological techniques used to measure and analyze behavior in industry. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credits for PSY314.
Prerequisite: PSY101.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 327: Cognitive Neuropsychology

This course explores how the brain carries out the functions of the mind. Through examinations of cognitive function following brain damage and patterns of brain activation during cognitive tasks, this course will explore the functional organization of our abilities to remember, use language, perceive the world, make plans, and experience emotion. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credits for PSY315 or PSY316.
Prerequisites: 1) PSY211 or 212, and one year of college biology or 2) PSY 101, BIO200, and BIO201

Credits: 3.00

PSY 328: Applied Behavior Analysis I

This course introduces students to the basic principles of behavior analysis derived from both classical and operant conditioning. Students will learn to use these principles to analyze and interpret examples of both overt and covert human behavior. In doing so, students will examine the relation between verbal and non-verbal behavior as it relates to the concepts of rule-governed behavior, self-control, and self-management. Prerequisite: At least six credits of course numbered PSY 205 - 299.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 329: Psychology of Language

This course provides an overview of the major topics, methods, and perspectives within the psychology of language. Included will be linguistic analysis, speech recognition, animal communication and language, language and thought, language acquisition, and language disorders. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: PSY211 and at least three additional credits of courses numbered PSY 205 - 299.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 330: Psychology and the Law

This course explores the psychology of human behavior as applied to the law. It will compare psychological perspectives and emphasize the role of psychologists as expert witnesses in resolving legal conflicts. Topics include psychological research related to jury selection and deliberation, eyewitness testimony and identification; the recovered memory debate; assessment of competence, the insane, and involuntary commitment; and psychological aspects of criminal profiling.
Prerequisites: PSY101 and Junior/Senior class standing.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 331: Clinical Psychology

This course provides an overview of the scientific and professional issues in the field of clinical psychology. It will focus on the professional role of the clinical psychologist in mental health settings. Topics include psychological assessment, forms of clinical intervention, research on the psychotherapy process and outcome, and current professional issues. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: PSY215 and at least three additional credits of courses numbered PSY 205 - 299..

Credits: 3.00

PSY 332: Evolutionary Psychology

This course examines human behavior and mental phenomena as the products of evolution by natural and sexual selection. Data on human and animal psychology, such as those found in studies of consciousness and cognition will be interpreted in light of principles of evolution, and current work designed to test evolutionary predictions will be considered. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: PSY 101.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 333: Psychology of Gender

This course will: explore gender as a social construction, examine theory and empirical research on gender, examine gender-related oppression and victimization, and investigate psychology's evolving understanding of this important social identity. Students will examine psychological literature on differences between women and men; social, biological, and cultural influences on gender; the experiences of transgender and gender nonconforming people; and the treatment of men and women in classic theories and research. The course will also consider the intersectionality of gender with other important social identities such as race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, and social class. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: PSY101 and one of the following: PSY215, PSY216, PSY217, PSY218, PSY251, PSY252, PSY322, IDS350, CRJ365, HST218, POL309, POL371, SOC305, or SOC306.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 334: Psychopharmacology

Psychopharmacology is the study of how drugs affect the brain, behavior, and cognition. Topics will include basic neurotransmission, drugs of abuse, and drug therapies for psychological disorders. Students will study fundamentals of neural communication, the psychological effects of drugs, and how drug actions can be understood in terms of effects on the brain. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: PSY 212 and three additional credits of courses numbered PSY 205 - 299.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 335: Physiological Psychology

This course examines the self as a product of hereditary and environmental influences on the structure and function of the brain. Topics include brain mechanisms underlying learning and behavior change, how the brain creates a coherent and useful conscious awareness of the world around us, and the brain's ability to carry our several functions simultaneously. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for PSY305.
Prerequisites: PSY212, either PSY210 or PSY328, and BIO124.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 336: Cognitive Development

This course examines how perception, thinking and reasoning, memory, and other mental processes change with development. Several theoretical perspectives will be explored, including Piagetian and New-Piagetian, information processing, psychometric and multiple intelligences. In addition to learning the theoretical perspectives, students will learn how cognition is assessed, how social and cultural context affect that assessment, and some practical applications. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: A course in developmental psychology (PSY 218, PSY 251, PSY 252, or PSY 322) and at least three additional credits of courses numbered PSY 205 - 299.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 337: Social Development

This course examines how personality, self-concept, attitudes, and behavior of the individual develop in interaction with biological, social, and cultural forces. Topics include attachment theory, development of the self, aggression, gender and ethnic identity, and moral development. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: A course in developmental psychology (PSY218, PSY251, PSY252, or PSY322), and at least three additional credits of courses numbered PSY 205 - 299.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 338: Applied Behavioral Analysis II

This course is a continuation of PSY328 (ABAI), which covers application, analysis, and synthesis of operant and respondent principles and procedures used for behavioral changes in a variety of applied settings. Topics covered include ethical considerations, behavioral systems support, selection of intervention strategies and evaluating outcomes, and the measurement, display, and interpretation of behavioral data. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: PSY328.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 340: Environmental Psychology

The relationship between human behavior and the physical environment, both natural and built. The behavioral effects of such things as spatial design, crowding, noise, privacy, personal space, and climate are examined. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: At least six credits of courses numbered PSY 205 - 299.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 344: Topics in Social and Cultural Diversity

This course will examine the psychological research and theories on a topic of social and cultural diversity. Cultural and social identities can influence how people perceive and respond to others. These issues will be explored in the context of specific topics that may include the psychology of prejudice and discrimination, the psychology of social class, cross-cultural psychology, or multicultural psychology, with specific attention to those groups that have less power and are subject to prejudice and discrimination in society. Students will gain an increased awareness of and appreciation for diverse perspectives, will discuss issues of prejudice and oppression, and will consider the similarities and differences across cultures. The course involves significant writing and revision, and students will use writing as a tool for learning and thinking about the content of the course. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites: At least one of the following: PSY215, 216, 217, or 218, and at least three additional credits of courses numbered PSY205-299.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level II

PSY 353: Philosophical Foundations of Psychology

This course explores the ideas and issues that have shaped psychology. Particular attention is given to basic and enduring questions behind psychology's varied and changing theoretical orientations. Psychology's historical milestones are examined in their intellectual, scientific, and cultural contexts. Students read original sources and engage in significant writing and revision. Not open to students who have received credits for PSY 404 or PSY 444. Prerequisite: 15 credits in Psychology..

Credits: 3.00

PSY 355: African American Psychology

This course is an introduction to historical and contemporary sociopsychological perspectives, theories, and research about African Americans and people of African descent in the U.S. Topics include personality self-attributes, racism and discrimination, salience of race among intersecting multiple sociocultural identities, achievement and education/schooling, kinship and family, intimate relationships, career and vocational development, religion, and spirituality, and mental health and collective well-being. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 431: Research in Animal Learning

This advanced research course focuses on the principles of behavior discovered in the animal laboratory. Students will be responsible for shaping the behavior of a rat to illustrate behavioral concepts and principles. Students will read and analyze advanced literature on animal learning and will engage in a substantial amount of informal and formal writing. Through revision of written work (based on feedback from peers and instructors), and through discussion of writing processes and conventions used by psychologists (e.g., from the publication guidelines of the American Psychological Association), students will learn to express themselves more effectively. Students will also reflect upon the ways that writing can support learning of advanced concepts in animal learning and behavior. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week.
Prerequisites: WII course, PSY 203S, PSY210 or 328, and at least six credits in courses numbered PSY300-399.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

PSY 432: Research in Developmental Psychology

This course presents the many methods used to study development across the lifespan, including observation, interview, questionnaire, and experiment. Through reading and discussing published research, and working on individual research projects, students learn the principles of research design necessary for investigating developmental change. Students will read and analyze advanced literature in developmental psychology and will engage in a substantial amount of informal and formal writing. Through revision of written work (based on feedback from peers and instructors), and through discussion of writing processes and conventions used by psychologists (e.g., from the publication guidelines of the American Psychological Association), students will learn to express themselves effectively. Students will also reflect upon the ways that writing can support learning of advanced concepts in the field.Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites: PSY203S, a course in developmental psychology (PSY218, PSY251, PSY252, PSY322, PSY336, PSY337, or PSY544), and at least six credits of courses numbered PSY300-399.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

PSY 518: Exploring Careers in Psychology

This course will expose students to professional development issues within psychology. Through readings, assignments, and guest speakers, students will explore topics such as: ethics and values in psychology; informed decision-making about coursework; opportunities at the baccalaureate, masters and doctoral levels; allied professions; how to pursue and fund graduate study; careers in psychology and psychology’s value to other careers; and graduate school culture and expectations. Limited to psychology majors for free elective credit only. This course will be graded Pass/Fail. 1.5 lecture hours per week. 1.5 cr.

Credits: 1.50

PSY 519: Internship Preparation

The course will guide students through the process of identifying internship sites of interest, preparing internship applications and acceptance documents, securing an appropriate internship placement and fostering the development of the knowledge, skills and abilities pertinent to successful internship placement. Limited to Psychology majors. This course will be graded Pass/Fail only. One and a half lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: PSY 101, minimum of 18 credits in Psychology, minimum GPA of 3.0 in Psychology.

Credits: 1.50

PSY 520: Internship in Psychology

The internship gives the student an opportunity to apply psychology in community, institutional, and business settings. Through this field experience the student explores career options, gains practical experience and skills, and makes contacts with potential employers. The specific type of internship setting will be determined by the student's interests and by the availability of placements. Open to Psychology majors with at least a 3.0 GPA in Psychology who have completed 24 credits in Psychology. This course may be repeated for additional credits.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 521: Applied Behavior Analysis Internship

The internship provides an opportunity to apply behavior analysis in community, institutional or business field settings. The student explores career options, gains practical experience and skills, and produces written products that synthesize experiences with readings in the area. The specific setting is determined by the student’s interests and by the availability of placements. Open to Psychology majors, with at least a 3.0 GPA who have completed 24 credits in Psychology, and required for the Applied Behavior Analysis concentration. This course may be repeated for additional credits.
Prerequisites: Grade of B or better in both PSY 210 and PSY 328.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

PSY 530: Directed Study in Psychology

This course is an opportunity for the student to do scholarly research or theoretical work under the supervision of a faculty member. Requires a written proposal approved by a faculty member and the Department Chairperson. This course cannot serve as a substitute for any required course in the Psychology curriculum. Open only to Juniors and Seniors with at least a 3.0 GPA in PSY courses.

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00

PSY 531: Independent Research in Psychology

This course is an opportunity for the student to conduct a substantial empirical research project on a significant psychological question, under supervision of a faculty member. Requires a written proposal approved by a faculty member and the Department Chairperson. This course cannot serve as a substitute for any required course in the Psychology curriculum. Limited to Juniors and Seniors with at least a 3.0 GPA in PSY courses.

Credits: 1.00 - 4.00

PSY 540: Seminar: Topics in Psychology

This seminar provides an opportunity for intensive study in a specific area of psychology in a small-group setting. Students will read and analyze advanced literature in the topic and will engage in a substantial amount of informal and formal writing. Through revision of written work (based on feedback from peers and instructors), and through discussion of writing processes and conventions used by psychologists (e.g., from the publication guidelines of the American Psychological Association), students will learn to express themselves more effectively. Students will also reflect upon the ways that writing can support learning of advanced concepts in the field. The seminar topic will be announced in advance. The topic will be announced in advance. Three hours per week.
Prerequisites: PSY203S, any PSY course numbered 210-299, and at least six credits of PSY courses numbered 300-399.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

PSY 541: Seminar in Biological Psychology

This course provides the student with an opportunity for advanced study and writing in a selected area of biological psychology. Students will read advanced literature in the topic and, through writing and revision, learn to express themselves effectively. The topic will be announced in advance. Three hours per week.
Prerequisites: PSY203S, PSY212, and at least six credits of PSY courses numbered 300-399.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

PSY 542: Seminar in Clinical Psychology

This course provides the student with an opportunity for advanced study and writing in a selected area of clinical psychology. Students will read advanced literature in the topic and, through writing and revision, learn to express themselves effectively. The topic will be announced in advance. Three hours per week.
Prerequisites: PSY203S, PSY 215, and at least six credits of PSY courses numbered 300-399.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

PSY 543: Seminar in Cognitive Psychology

This seminar provides an opportunity for intensive study, in a small-group setting, in cognitive psychology. Students will read and analyze advanced cognitive literature and will engage in a substantial amount of informal and formal writing. Through revision of written work (based on feedback from peers and instructors), and through discussion of writing processes and conventions used by psychologists (e.g., from the publication guidelines of the American Psychological Association), students will learn to express themselves more effectively. Students will also reflect upon the ways that writing can support learning of advanced concepts in the subfield of cognitive psychology. The specific topic will be announced in advance. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: WII course, PSY203S, PSY211, and at least six credits of PSY courses numbered 300-399.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

PSY 544: Seminar in Developmental Psychology

This seminar provides an opportunity for intensive study, in a small-group setting, in developmental psychology. Students will read and analyze advanced developmental literature and will engage in a substantial amount of informal and formal writing. Through revision of written work (based on feedback from peers and instructors), and through discussion of writing processes and conventions used by psychologists (e.g., from publication guidelines of the American Psychological Association), students will learn to express themselves more effectively. Students will also reflect upon the ways that writing can support learning of advanced concepts in developmental psychology. The topic will be announced in advance. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites: WII course, PSY203S, one of the following: PSY218, 251, 252, or 322, and at least six credits of PSY courses numbered 300-399.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

PSY 545: Seminar in Learning Theory

This seminar provides an opportunity for intensive study, in a small-group setting, in learning theory. Students will read and analyze advanced literature in learning theory and will engage in a substantial amount of informal and formal writing. Through revision of written work (based on feedback from peers and instructors), and through discussion of writing processes and conventions used by psychologists (e.g., from the publication guidelines of the American Psychological Association), students will learn to express themselves more effectively. Students will also reflect upon the ways that writing can support learning of advanced concepts in the learning theory subfield. The specific topic will be announced in advance. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites: WII course, PSY203S, PSY210, and at least six credits of PSY courses numbered 300-399.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

PSY 547: Seminar in Social Psychology

This course provides the student with an opportunity for advanced study and writing in a selected area of social psychology. Students will read advanced literature in the topic and, through writing and revision, learn to express themselves effectively. The topic will be announced in advance. Three hours per week.
Prerequisites: PSY203S, PSY216, and at least six credits of PSY courses numbered 300-399.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

PSY 600H: Honors in Psychology

This course is only for Psychology majors who have attained a 3.5 cumulative average in Psychology. It involves a Directed Study under the supervision of one or more members of the Psychology faculty.
Prerequisite: Invitation and/or acceptance by the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00 - 6.00

PSY 601H: Honors Independent Research in Psychology

This course is an opportunity for the student to conduct a substantial empirical research project on a significant psychological question, under supervision of a faculty member. Students will read advanced literature in the topic. Through writing and revision, they will learn to write professionally, use writing as a tool for learning, and develop and defend a thesis. Requires a written proposal approved by a faculty member and the Department Chairperson. Limited to Psychology majors with at least a 3.5 GPA in PSY courses.
Prerequisite: Invitation and/or acceptance by the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00 - 6.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

PSY 700: Research Methods in Psychology

This course introduces the student to procedures and techniques in conducting psychological research including statistical procedures used in describing and analyzing data. It enables the student to interpret research extracted from psychological journals.
Prerequisite: Statistics and Experimentation I or equivalent.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 701: Perspectives On Adulthood and Old Age

The process of maturation from young adulthood to old age. Emphasis is on the relevance of physiological, psychological and social factors during this period of development.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 705: Human Development Across the Lifespan

This course will examine physical, behavioral, cognitive, socio-emotional and moral development from conception until death. Examining a diverse set of cultures and subcultures, development will be understood in terms of major theoretical perspectives and of relevant research. Applications of developmental knowledge to understanding and working with typically and non-typically developing individuals will be included.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 715: Behavioral Principles of Learning

This course provides a background for understanding the relationship between experimental and applied behavioral work, and deals with basic and selected topics in respondent and operant conditioning of human and animal behavior. Special emphasis is given to definitions, characteristics, principles, processes and concepts in experimental and applied behavior analysis. Also covered are ethical considerations in human and animal research, and the measurement, display, and interpretation of data.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 720: Theories of Personality

This course provides the student with an in-depth analysis of historical and contemporary models of personality. Students are required to develop an eclectic system which they can use in understanding human behavior. Emphasis will be placed on systems which are dynamic, interactional, and developmental.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 725: Applied Behavior Analysis I

This course deals with the application of basic behavior analytic methods, and introduces the student to intervention strategies in a variety of settings. Topics include behavioral measurement and interpretation of intervention data, ethical considerations, and translating experimental research into applied work.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 726: Applied Behavior Analysis II

This is a continuation of PSY 725 Applied Behavior Analysis I, and introduces more complex intervention strategies for changing behavior in various settings. There will be an emphasis on ethical considerations, experimental evaluation of interventions, and functional assessment and selection of appropriate intervention strategies.
Prerequisites: PSY 725

Credits: 3.00

PSY 727: Exam Preparation in Behavior Analysis

The content of the course will vary according to current BACB® examination tasks lists and incoming pre-test performance of students enrolled in the course. Students are expected to become familiar with their strengths and weaknesses in the content areas and to develop plans for self-study. Progress is evaluated based on pre- and post-tests.
Course Prerequisites: Must have completed the BACB-approved six-course sequence (PSY 715, 725, 726, 825, 830, & 840), or permission of the coordinator.

Credits: 1.50 - 3.00

PSY 731: Counseling Theory and Practice I

This course includes the theory and practice of counseling. It examines the helping relationship, the historical development of counseling, the characteristics and concerns of counselors and the goals of counseling as well as the basic approaches toward counseling, diagnosis and referral procedures. Ethical and legal considerations are discussed.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 732: Counseling Theory and Practice II

Each student is expected, through counseling-related required readings, lectures and discussion of various theories of counseling and psychotherapy, group and individual counseling presentations, counseling role playing sessions, critiqued video and audio taped counseling sessions, case studies involvement, to refine and to further develop his/her own counseling style.
Prerequisite: PSY731

Credits: 3.00

PSY 733: Principles of Psychological Testing

This course is offered for both teachers and counselors. The aim of the course is to introduce the basic principles of psychological testing and to study, in depth, the most commonly used instruments for assessing intelligence, achievement, aptitude, interest, and personality.
Prerequisite: Measurement and Evaluation or equivalent.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 734N: Community Counseling in a Multicultural and Diverse Society

The focus is on non-traditional approaches to helping others. The course includes the development of skills in areas such as consultation, crisis intervention, and the assessment and development of community resources. It is recommended for students interested in employment in educational institutions, mental health facilities, human services agencies and rehabilitation settings.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 735: Philosophical Foundations of Psychology

This course covers the historical underpinnings of, and current developments in, the systems of thought in psychology: Psychoanalytic, Behavioral, Humanistic, and Cognitive. In addition, current interdisciplinary developments are discussed as they relate to areas to produce biological and physiological emphases in psychology.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 736N: Behavioral and Cognitive Behavioral Therapies

This course will introduce students to the history, philosophy and conceptual model of cognitive behavioral therapy, and address the practice issues revolving around models of treatment, standards of care and the importance of empirically validated treatment. Students will learn basic intervention strategies, for example, relaxation training, cognitive restructuring, brief/graduated exposure therapy, and several others.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 737: Nature of Adolescence

This course exposes the student to a variety of broad-based (e.g., Freud, Erikson, Piaget) and more narrowly defined theories concerning adolescent development. Empirical studies are covered in relation to these theories as well as to the further understanding of adolescence.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 738: Child Development and Public Policy

This course covers both the interrelationship between agencies of socialization and the laws and policies of government, and the overall effects on child development and education. Topics include day care, early education intervention programs, family and child rights, and child health.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 739: Developmental Psychopathology

This course stresses the abnormal-deviant, pathological, and maladaptive - influences on human development and compares various forms of intervention. Attention will be paid to theoretical approaches to psychopathology such as psychoanalytic, learning, and behavioral therapies. Specific types of interventions such as pharmacotherapies, nondirective play therapy, conjoint family therapy, and mutimodal types are included.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 740: Differential Diagnosis

This course presents the student with an understanding of the current classificatory system used in the field of clinical psychology. It is intended to develop competence in the diagnosis of personality disorders with a focus on the overlap of diagnostic categories.
Prerequisite: Either PSY730N or PSY739 .

Credits: 3.00

PSY 741: Group Counseling

This course assists counselors/educators to meet the needs of youth through group procedures. Basic principles, research, and types of organizational procedures for group activities are analyzed. Opportunities exist for class members to observe their own behavior and that of others through role playing, video taping, and group exercise.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 743: Contemporary Families

Traditional definitions of the family may have restricted the practice of marriage/couples/family counseling. As is well known, the nuclear family is now in the minority. By exploring historical, biological and cross-cultural evidence on families, this course will "put the family into perspective." The course will examine the many different forms that families can take, with a particular goal of exploring which aspects of families help the individuals in them to thrive.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 744: Interpersonal Relationships

Using Erikson's sixth stage (intimacy vs. isolation) as a theoretical framework, this course will present recent and extensive research about the various forms of interpersonal relationships likely to be encountered in marriage/couples or family counseling. Specialized topics, such as multicultural differences, historical changes, love and sexuality, social networks, and power, conflict and violence in interpersonal relationships, will be covered.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 745: Gender and Human Sexuality

This course will address issues related to gender and human sexuality that are likely to be encountered in marriage/couples or family counseling. Development of and changes in sexual identity, gender identity and sexual orientation throughout the life span will be covered. Specialized topics will include sexual dysfunction, enhancing and limiting fertility, abortion and sexual coercion. Gender and sexual expression will be considered in multicultural as well as historic contexts.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 757N: Marital/couples and Family Counseling

The course is designed for teachers, guidance counselors, nurses, marriage/couples and family therapists. The course will include an overview of family systems, communications dynamics and practical skills for coping with life situations in contemporary family systems. Theoretical approaches will be reinforced through case history procedures stressing child rearing practices.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 758B: Marital/couples and Family Psychotherapy

The basic concept and techniques of family therapy are examined. The course focuses on problem identification assessment, stages of therapy and counseling strategies. Techniques of family therapy are presented which are practiced through role playing and case studies.
Prerequisite: PSY757N

Credits: 3.00

PSY 780N: Industrial/organizational Psychology

This course presents an overview of the field, including the study of selection, placement, training and development, performance measurement and evaluation, job/task analysis, work satisfaction and motivation, supervision leadership and behavioral management, and job workplace design. The techniques used by the industrial psychologist are emphasized.
Prerequisites: General or Introductory Psychology and a course dealing with statistics or test and measurement.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 781: Personnel Selection and Placement

This course studies the procedures used in recruiting, identifying, selecting and placing people in jobs where they have the best chance for success. The measurement and identification of job performance knowledge, skills and abilities are covered. Both theoretical and practical considerations are emphasized.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 782: Work Motivation, Job Satisfaction and Task Design

Work motivation and job satisfaction are stressed in relation to such practical issues as work behavior, absenteeism, and turnover. Techniques to measure motivation and satisfaction are presented and evaluated. Physical and task environment variables and their interaction with work motivation and satisfaction are emphasized.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 783: Training and Development in Organization

This course covers the theory, principles, and practices in the field of training and development in organization. The Instructional Systems Development (ISD) approach is presented as a model for the logical sequence of steps in the development of training programs. Other topics include scientifically based training principles, task and person analysis, and legal issues.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 784: Measurement and Appraisal of Work Behavior

The student is presented with: the various statistical and psychometric considerations in behavior measurement; job/task analysis techniques, the procedures for identifying and developing job performance criteria measures; and techniques to integrate these fundamental steps into a formal appraisal and review system.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 785: Research in Organizations

This course focuses on the application of basic psychological research procedures and techniques to Industrial/Organizational Psychology. There will be specific consideration of research topics related to human resources, organizational development and program evaluation. Students will design and conduct research projects relevant to organizational goals.
Prerequisites: PSY786 and PSY780

Credits: 3.00

PSY 786: Statistics and Data Analysis for I/o Psychology

This course presents statistics used by I/O psychologists including measures of central tendency and variability, sampling distributions, differences between means, univariate ANOVA, linear regression, correlation, and multiple regression. Students will become familiar with multivariate ANOVA, nonlinear regression, and correlation, path and factor analysis, meta-analysis, and causal modeling. Students will use a major statistical software package.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 787: Psychology of Organizational Development Consulting

This course provides an overview of the psychologist's role as a consultant in the organizational change process. Students will learn the history and theory of organizational consulting, what organizational psychologists do when consulting and how they do it. Specific topics will include organizational problem diagnosis, intervention planning, consulting strategies, change process implementation and intervention evaluation.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 788: Social Psychology

This course examines how people think, act, and interact with each other in diverse social situations. Topics will include social cognition, attitude structure and change, prosocial behavior, aggression, prejudice and stereotyping, social influence, group processes and intergroup relations, social neuroscience, and cultural and evolutionary social psychology. The course will focus on both the empirical research and the theoretical frameworks of social psychology. Practical applications of social psychology will also be considered.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 789: Environmental Psychology

This course examines the psychological connections between people and the built and natural environment. Topics will include environmental perception, cognition, and attitudes; natural and built environments; personal space; territoriality, place attachment, crowding, and density; climate and weather; sustainability; and environmental design. The course will focus on both historical as well as emerging trends in the field.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 790: Psychometrics

This course will introduce students to psychometric theory, research, and methods that provide the basic skills necessary to construct, evaluate, and interpret psychological tests. Test applications will also be covered. Classical test theory views of reliability, item analysis, validity, and test development principles will be included. Moreover, modern approaches to test theory, including item response theory and generalizabilty theory, will be examined.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 791: Organizational Psychology

This course examines the complicated systems of individual and group psychological processes in organizations. The impact of the organization on the individual and on groups of individuals is emphasized. The course investigates the relationship between organizational psychology theories and organizational development practices. Specific topics include theories of leadership in organizations, group processes, work motivation and job satisfaction. Particular emphasis will be placed on contemporary issues involving modern organizations,

Credits: 3.00

PSY 817: Experimental Analysis of Behavior

Students will develop a practical understanding of the principles and procedures within the experimental analysis of behavior. Topics will include schedules of reinforcement, stimulus control, conditioned reinforcement, choice, and establishing/abolishing operations. Students will complete online or in-person labs, read relevant primary research articles, and prepare a final experimental project proposal that is developed in consultation with the instructor.
Prerequisites: None

Credits: 3.00

PSY 820: Theory and Treatment of Substance Abuse Disorders

This course introduces substance abuse theories, research, and treatment. Using a biopsychosocial perspective, students will learn the physiological and psychological effects of alcohol and other drugs, and the effects of substance abuse on individuals, families and communities. Current treatments considered effective for different populations will be discussed.
Prerequisites: PSY731 and PSY740, or permission from the Instructor.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 825: Behavioral Assessment

This course provides an in-depth examination of how to conduct functional behavioral assessments as a necessary and integral component of three interrelated processes in applied behavior analysis: problem identification, program design, and outcome evaluation. Case studies will be used throughout the course.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 830: Small N Research Design & Analysis

This course provides an overview of the research methods particular to experimental and applied behavior analysis. Small N research designs are emphasized and compared with case studies and group designs. Special emphasis will be on the measurement of behavior, displaying behavioral data, and interpreting behavioral data. Additional topics will include ethical consideration in behavioral research and applications, as well as experimental evaluation of interventions.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 840: Legal, Ethical and Professional Issues in Applied Behavioral Analysis

This course deals with the legal, ethical and professional issues that arise in the career of a behavior analyst. Topics include appropriately identifying functional relations, selecting targets for change, deciding when to implement behavior change procedures, evaluating the outcomes and kinds of interventions, and considerations in working with human and non-human populations. All course topics will be considered with respect to laws, professional codes of ethics and cultural competencies that are relevant and specific to behavior analysts.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 842: Conceptual Issues in Behavior Analysis

This course examines the conceptual underpinning of behaviorism, the philosophy underlying behavior analysis. The readings will focus on the writings of prominent behavior analysts as primary sources or will be organized around a specific theme in the field (e.g., private events, phylogeny and ontogeny, cultural design, verbal behavior, etc.) The topic will be announced in advance.
Course Prerequisites: At least one of PSY 715 or PSY 725, or permission of the coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 875: Directed Study

An independent research project supervised by a faculty member of the Psychology Department.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 876: Directed Study

An independent research project supervised by a faculty member of the Psychology Department.

Credits: 3.00 - 6.00

PSY 877: Psychopharmacology

This course examines the use of psychopharmacological agents in the treatment of psychological disorders. The indications, usage, positive behavioral effects and adverse effects of psychoactive drugs will be explored. Particular emphasis will be placed on diagnostic, behavioral and epidemiological considerations of psychological disorders.
Prerequisite: PSY740 preferred, or either PSY730 or PSY739.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 878: The Psychology of Small Group Leadership

This course will focus on assisting professionals to develop small group leadership skills. The psychological principles of small group leadership will be analyzed and related research will be reviewed. Class members will lead, participate, and process small group simulations and role plays to develop a personal orientation to small group leadership that integrates psychological theory and experiential learning.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 899: Psychology Masters Thesis I

In this course, the student develops a thesis proposal that requires a plan for empirical research on a significant psychological question related to the student's program of study. The proposal is developed under the supervision of a faculty member and thesis committee.
Prerequisites: Final year of Master's program, minimum 3.5 GPA in courses or invitation by a faculty sponsor, and approval in writing by both the Faculty sponsor and the program coordinator. Required for students pursuing the thesis option.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 930N: Practicum

This full semester course will provide for the development of basic counseling skills by combining weekly class sessions with direct work with clients in a clinical setting. The course requires a minimum of 100 clock hours of supervised experiences to include a minimum of 40 hours of direct service work with clientele, 10 hours of individual supervision by an on-site supervisor and 15 hours of group supervision. Selected practicum sites must be approved in writing by the Program Coordinator, who at the student's initiative, meets with the student several times during the semester preceding the practicum assignment.

Credits: 4.00

PSY 931R: Internship

This course will build upon the skills learned in the practicum and provide for the development of advanced counseling skills by combining in class academic work with direct work with clients in a clinical setting. The course requires weekly class sessions, a minimum of 600 clock hours of supervised experience to include a minimum of 240 hours of direct service with clientele, 15 hours of individual supervision by an on site supervisor and 30 hours of group supervision. Internship hours in excess of 600 must conform to 1 hour of individual supervision for every 16 hours of client contact.
Prerequisites: 42 semester hours of program courses including PSY930N. Selected internship sites must be approved in writing by the Program Coordinator who, at the initiative of the student, meets with the student several times during the semester preceding the internship assignment.

Credits: 4.00

PSY 940: Internship in Industrial/organizational Psychology

Students in this course will apply skills from coursework during a 300-hour internship in a work setting, and will attend a weekly group meeting. The internship will focus on issues in Human Resources or Organizational Development. Students must meet with program coordinator at least one semester ahead to set up the internship. Permission from the Program Coordinator necessary for enrollment.
Prerequisites: PSY785, PSY780, MGT780, BUS850 and at least one course in one of the specialty areas of Human Resources or Organizational Development.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 990: Special Topics in Psychology

These courses provide intensive instruction on special topics in Psychology. The specific content of the courses will be designed by the instructor(s). Instruction may take the form of seminars, conferences, or institutes; courses may occur at Salem State College or at a community location.

Credits: 3.00

PSY 992: Special Topics in Psychology

These courses provide intensive instruction on special topics in Psychology. The specific content of the courses will be designed by the instructor(s). Instruction may take the form of seminars, conferences, or institutes; courses may occur at Salem State College or at a community location.

Credits: 3.00 - 6.00

PSY 993: Special Topics in Industrial Organizational Psychology

These courses provide intensive instruction on special topics in Industrial organizational Psychology. The specific content of the courses will be designed by the instructor(s). Instruction may take the form of seminars, conferences, or institutes. This course may be taken up to three times for credit, providing that the special topic is different each time, and this course may be taken for multiple credit within a term. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00 - 6.00

PSY 999: Psychology Masters Thesis II

The thesis requires empirical research on a significant psychological question related to the student's program of study. The thesis is carried out under supervision of a faculty member and thesis committee.
Prerequisites: Final year of Master's program, minimum 3.5 GPA in courses or invitation by a faculty sponsor, and approval in writing by both the Faculty sponsor and the program coordinator. For MS in Behavior Analysis students, a passing grade in PSY 899.

Credits: 3.00

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