Courses Offered in Biology | Salem State University Skip to main content

Courses Offered in Biology

Biology

BIO 105: Biological Systems

This course deals with fundamental biological systems, from the cellular to the organismal level. With appropriate reference to man, the course will emphasize the unity and diversity of operational systems in all organisms. Topics are intended to provide a foundation of basic principles and vocabulary to be utilized in Anatomy and Physiology, Microbiology, and Nursing courses. Laboratory exercises introduce dissection, microscopy, experimentation and observation. Three lecture hours and one two-hour laboratory per week. Not open to students who have completed BIO 101 or BIO 103 or BIO 122, or BIO 132.
Co-requisite: CHE 117 or CHE 124 or CHE 130.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning Lab

BIO 115H: Honors Biology-organisms

This course focuses on biological diversity and includes the topics of ecology, evolution, and a survey of living organisms. Three lecture hours and one two-hour laboratory per week. Open only to students in the Honors Program. Not open to Biology or Nursing Majors. Not open to students who have completed BIO102 or BIO103, or BIO105, or BIO108H or BIO121 or BIO131. Together with BIO116H, this course can be used as a lab science sequence in the current/old core curriculum.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning Lab

BIO 116H: Honors Biology-cells

Topics covered in this course include cell structure and function, biochemical principles, genetics, and organ systems. Three lecture hours and one two-hour laboratory per week. Open only to students in the Honors Program. Not open to students who have completed BIO101 or BIO103, or BIO105 or BIO107H or BIO122 or BIO132.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning Lab

BIO 121: Diversity of Life

Features of diversity among organisms are emphasized. Topics include taxonomy, a survey of the biological kingdoms, anatomy and physiology of representative organisms, and the interaction of the organism and its living and nonliving environment. Three lecture hours and one two-hour laboratory per week. Not open to students who have completed BIO102 or BIO103, or BIO108H, or BIO115H,or BIO131.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning Lab

BIO 122: World of Cells

Basic biological principles common to all living things are emphasized. Topics include basic chemistry, cell form and function, respiration, photosynthesis, principles of Mendelian and molecular genetics, the origin of life, and principles of evolution. Three lecture hours and one two-hour laboratory per week. Not open to students who have completed BIO101 or BIO103, or BIO105, or BIO107H, or BIO116H, or BIO 132.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning Lab

BIO 124: Human and Social Biology

This course is given in two units. I: The phylogeny of Homo sapiens and the milestones in human social and cultural development, including the role humans play in global ecology. II: Human genetics and the structural and functional organization of the human body. Three lecture hours and one two-hour laboratory per week. Not open to students who have completed BIO102B, BIO121 or BIO123.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning Lab

BIO 131: Introduction to Organisms

This course is intended as one-half of a two-semester sequence with BIO132. This course examines the diversity of life within evolutionary and ecological frameworks. Lecture topics include the kingdoms of life, evolutionary theory, basic anatomy and physiology of organisms, behavior, ecosystems and ecology. Emphasis will be placed on the different physiological and ecological adaptations of organisms for a vast array of ecosystems within the natural world. Laboratory exercises introduce basic dissection techniques, computer simulations, experimental design and analysis and experiments on the interactions between organisms and their environments. Student projects involve group experiments developing lab and field work, library and presentation skills. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. Intended for students majoring in Biology. Not open to students who have completed BIO102 or BIO 108H, or BIO115H or BIO121.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning Lab

BIO 132: Introduction to Cells

This course is intended as one half of a two-semester sequence with BIO131. An integrated course stressing basic principles of biology. Lecture topics include chemistry, cell structure and function, metabolism, genetics, DNA and protein synthesis, and evolution. Life processes are examined to illustrate these biological concepts. Emphasis is placed on relationships between structure and function at the cellular level. Laboratory exercises introduce microscopy, scientific writing and research, data analysis, and experimental techniques. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. Intended for students majoring in Biology or Geology. Not open to students who have completed BIO101 or BIO103, or BIO105, or BIO107H, or BIO116H, or BIO122.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning Lab

BIO 200: Anatomy and Physiology I

This is the first half of a two-course sequence, within which the various systems of the human body will be studied, including tissues and skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Appropriate medical terminology will be introduced. Three lecture hours and one-three hour laboratory per week. Not open to Biology majors, except those with a concentration in Medical Technology or Nuclear Medicine Technology, or to students who have completed BIO206.
Prerequisites: BIO 105 or an introductory Biology lab sequence; CHE 117 or CHE 124 or CHE 130; or permission of the Department Chairperson.
Co-requisite for Biology majors: CHE 212.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 201: Anatomy and Physiology II

A continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I with emphasis on the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, endocrine, immune and reproductive systems. Appropriate medical terminology will be introduced. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. Not open to Biology Majors, except those with a concentration in Medical Technology or Nuclear Medicine Technology, or to students who have completed BIO206.
Prerequisite: BIO200.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 204: Introduction to Human Genetics

This course examines human heredity and related social issues. Topics include the physical basis of heredity, gene expression, human genetic diversity and disease, gene technology, and bioethics. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning

BIO 206: Structure and Function of the Human Body

A study of the fundamental anatomy and physiology of the human body including basic concepts of the skeletal, muscular, nervous, digestive, cardiovascular, endocrine, respiratory, and urogenital systems. Three lecture hours and one two-hour laboratory per week. Not open to Biology majors or students who have completed BIO200-201.
Prerequisites: BIO102 or BIO102B, or BIO103, or BIO105, or BIO108H, or BIO115H-116H, or BIO121-122, or BIO121-123, or BIO122-124, or BIO131-132, or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 208: Environmental Problems: An Ecological Approach

A course which explores the scientific basis for current local, regional and worldwide environmental problems. The principles underlying the support and maintenance of ecosystems are discussed. The course material demonstrates how solutions to environmental problems lie in recognizing ecological principles and managing human ecosystems accordingly. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: One introductory college-level natural science course or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

BIO 210: Basic Nutrition

Foods, their sources and groupings. The caloric, carbohydrate, fat, protein, vitamin, and mineral components of foods. The effects of adequate, excessive, and deficient amounts of these components on bodily health. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: One college-level course in Biology or Chemistry.

Credits: 3.00

BIO 212: Cell Biology

An analysis of cells, the basic units of life, emphasizing eukaryotic subcellular and molecular structures and how they influence and control cell functions. The course will involve investigating relationships of intracellular structures and interactions of cells with their environment using an integration of cytological, ultrastructural, biochemical, physiological, molecular, and genetic approaches. Laboratories will stress investigative methods of studying cells. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. Intended for students majoring in Biology.
Prerequisites: BIO102 or BIO102B, or BIO103, or BIO105, or BIO108H, or BIO115H-116H, or BIO121-122, or BIO122-123, or BIO122-124, BIO131-132, or permission of Department Chairperson; and CHE130.
Co-requisite: CHE212.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 214: Marine Biology

Marine Biology is an introduction to the biology of marine organisms. Selected organisms will be used to develop an understanding of the biological principles common to marine organisms. The taxonomy, evolution, ecology, behavior, and physiology of marine life will be discussed. Demonstrations and occasional local field trips will stress the identification of local marine forms and the ecology of different habitats. In the Fall semester, field trips may occur on weekends. Not open to Biology Majors or students who have taken BIO322.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning

BIO 215: Microbes and the Immune System

Each human is a superorganism! You are the cellular and anatomical structures that make up your body, along with the millions of microorganisms that live with you on all parts of the body exposed to the environment. This course will explore the structure and function of the human immune system and the human microbiome that interact to keep us free of disease, as well as the activity of the immune system when responding to an invader or injury. Epidemiology, treatment, and prevention of disease outbreaks will be covered, as well as strategies to maintain a healthy microbiome and immune system. Three lecture hours per week. May not be used as a Biology major elective.

Credits: 3.00

BIO 220: Evolutionary Morphology

This course explores the evolutionary morphology of vertebrates and includes some comparison with invertebrates. Topics include development, morphology, evolution and evolutionary history, biomechanics, and biophysics. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites: An introductory Biology lab sequence, or permission of the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

BIO 300: Botany

A survey of major plant groups with emphasis on plant relationships, means of reproduction, morphology, and physiology. Fieldwork will be programmed when conditions are favorable. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. Scheduled weekend field trips will be required.
Prerequisite: An introductory Biology laboratory sequence, or permission of the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 301: Conservation Biology

This course is designed to apply basic biological principles and theories to the challenges involved in the conservation of genetic, species, and community diversity. Current threats to biological diversity and the efficacy of conservation efforts will be addressed. Special emphasis will be placed on the global scope of this rapidly evolving science. Through the use of informational technology, students will investigate local and international conservation issues. Occasional field trips may be required. Four lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: An Introductory Biology laboratory sequence or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 304: Microbiology and Its Applications

An introduction to the characteristics and biology of microorganisms, with emphasis on the epidemiology of human pathogens, and understanding of the infective process, immunology, and control of these organisms. The laboratory phase of this course will provide the student with practice in aseptic techniques and manipulation of microbial environments. Three lecture hours and one two-hour laboratory per week. Not allowed for Biology major credits or open to Biology majors.
Prerequisites: BIO105, CHE125.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 305: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

A study of the ontogeny, phylogeny, structure, and taxonomy of the vertebrates. Laboratory will consist of the comparative, systematic dissection and study of selected vertebrate types. Three lecture hours and two two-hour laboratories per week.
Prerequisites: BIO101-102 or BIO103, or BIO105, or BIO107H-108H, or BIO115H-116H, or BIO121-122, or BIO122-123, or BIO122-124, or BIO131-132, or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 308: Entomology

The morphology, physiology, ecology, taxonomy, and systematics of insects are studied. Methods of identifying, collecting, and preserving insects are introduced; the preparation of a small insect collection is required. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week; required field trips to local habitats for observation and collection of insects will be scheduled for two Saturdays in September. Offered in the Fall of even-numbered years.
Prerequisites: BIO101-102, or BIO103, or BIO105, or BIO108H, or BIO115H-116H, or BIO121-122, or BIO122-123, or BIO122-124, or BIO131-132, or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 310: Invertebrate Zoology

The morphology, physiology, ecology, taxonomy, and systematics of invertebrates are studied. Required field trips, including two full-day trips, perhaps on weekends, to local habitats and scientific institutions for observation of aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates will be conducted. Three lecture hours and two two-hour laboratories per week.
Prerequisites: BIO101-102 or BIO103, or BIO105, or BIO108H, or BIO115H-116H, or BIO121-122, or BIO122-123, or BIO122-124, or BIO131-132, or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 311: Cell Communications

This course will explore the molecular mechanisms that cells utilize to detect and respond to the extracellular environment. Cells employ many sophisticated means of biochemical communication to obtain nutrients, maintain stable internal conditions, reproduce, differentiate, and migrate. This course will examine the biochemical and molecular processes that contribute to these cellular behaviors.
Prerequisites: BIO212 and CHE213, or permission of the department chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

BIO 312: Developmental Biology

The basic principles of development are studied. Though material illustrating developmental stages in a wide variety of organisms, including protistans, plants, and animals will be used, the major emphasis will be on development in vertebrates. The biochemical, morphological, and evolutionary aspects of development will be studied. The laboratory will combine descriptive and experimental exercises. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. Not open to students who have received credit for BIO312N.
Prerequisite: BIO212, or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 312N: Developmental Biology

The basic principles of development are studied. Though material illustrating developmental stages in a wide variety of organisms, including protistans, plants, and animals will be used, the major emphasis will be on development in vertebrates. The biochemical, morphological, and evolutionary aspects of development will be studied. The laboratory will combine descriptive and experimental exercises. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. Not open to students who have received credit for BIO312.
Prerequisite: BIO212, or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 313: Molecular Biology

An introduction to major concepts and experimental techniques in molecular biology. This course examines the synthesis of DNA, RNA, and proteins, and the regulation of these processes. Molecular biology techniques covered in lecture include cloning, gene fusions, DNA sequencing, basics of DNA and protein sequence analysis (bioinformatics), PCR, DNA microarrays and electrophoresis. Laboratories will focus on methods used in cloning DNA. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. One or two field trips off campus may be required. Occasional short periods of lab work outside of the schedule time may be required.
Prerequisite: BIO212, or permission of the Department Chairperson.
Co-requisite: CHE213.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 314: Vertebrate Histology

A study of the microscopic structure and related function of tissues and organs of vertebrate organisms with emphasis on mammals. In addition, lecture material will include discussion of the physiology of tissues and introduction of histochemistry and electron microscope descriptions. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: BIO101-102, or BIO103, or BIO105, or BIO107H-108H, or BIO115H-116H, or BIO121-122, or BIO122-123, or BIO122-124, or BIO131-132, or permission of Department Chairperson. BIO 212 strongly advised.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 315: Natural History of the Vertebrates

A study of the vertebrate animals, with emphasis on their ecology and life histories. Lab and fieldwork will include identification of vertebrates, museum techniques used in specimen preparation and storage, and field methods used in vertebrate studies. Several weekend field trips will be required. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: BIO101-102 or BIO103, or BIO105, or BIO107H-108H, or BIO115H-116H, or BIO121-122, or BIO122-123, or BIO122-124, or BIO131-132, or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 316: Parasitology

An introduction to the study of the protozoan and helminth parasites. The laboratory will involve identification of prepared slides of parasitic types and also collecting and staining parasites from marine and freshwater hosts. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: BIO103 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 317: Methods in Biotechnology

Biotechnology is applied biology which uses living organisms or their processes in the manufacture of products for biological research, health care, pharmaceutical manufacturing or consumer use. Lecture will examine current methods for production and detection of genes and gene products created in model organisms. Topics may include current techniques in nucleic acid and protein sequencing or expression in model organisms, and antibody use and production. Laboratories focus on tissue culture and expression and detection of exogenous nucleic acids or proteins in cultured cells using molecular biological and antibody techniques. Field trips off campus may be required. Occasional short periods of lab work outside of the scheduled course time may be required. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIO 212, CHE 212. Limited to students with a minimum of C in BIO 212, or permission of the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 320: General Ecology

A study of relationships between organisms and their environments. Lectures deal with the structure and function of the ecosystem, with special emphasis upon the concepts of productivity, energy flow, material cycling, population dynamics, and species diversity in terrestrial and aquatic environments. Fieldwork will include measurement and quantitative description of local ecosystems. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. Required of Biology majors seeking Secondary Education Biology certification.
Prerequisites: BIO101-102 or BIO103, or BIO105, or BIO107H-108H, or BIO115H-116H, or BIO121-122, or BIO122-123, or BIO122-124, or BIO131-132, or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 322: Biological Oceanography

A detailed view of the physical, chemical, geological, and biological factors that determine the nature of life in the sea. Adaptations, patterns of distribution, and production of plankton, nekton, and benthos with special attention to their interrelationships and interactions with the environment will be studied. Occasional field trips including one two-day field trip, perhaps on a weekend. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: BIO101-102 or BIO103, or BIO105, or BIO107H-108H, or BIO115H-116H, or BIO121-122, or BIO122-123, or BIO122-124, or BIO131-132, or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 323: Fish Biology

Students will explore the structure, systematics and function of fishes. The biology of locally important species is emphasized, but the global diversity of freshwater and marine fishes is examined. Instruction is through lectures, discussions, and hands-on experiences that include dissection, use of dichotomous keys, and developing/conducting an experiment examining in-depth the physiological function of at least one organ system. Required weekend field trips may be scheduled. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: BIO101-102, or BIO103, or BIO105, or BIO108H, or BIO115H-116H, or BIO121-122, or BIO122-123, or BIO122-124, or BIO131-132, or permission of Department Chairperson

Credits: 4.00

BIO 325: Behavioral Ecology

This course will explore the field of animal behavior from an ecological and evolutionary perspective, focusing on social behavior in vertebrates and invertebrates. The course examines mechanisms of behavior and their adaptive functions. Topics include principles of communication, mating systems, sexual selection, game theory, foraging, predator avoidance and social living. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory each week.
Pre-requisite: An introductory biology laboratory sequence or permission of the department chair.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 326: Marine Botany

A survey of plants living in seawater environments with particular emphasis on taxonomy, morphology, and ecology. Selected studies on algal physiology are also included. In addition to the regularly scheduled lab/field program, students will be required to plan and participate in two one-day field trips on the weekend. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: BIO101-102, or BIO103, or BIO105, or BIO107H-108H, or BIO115H-116H, or BIO121-122, or BIO122-123, or BIO122-124, or BIO131-132, or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 330: Molecular Forensics

This course will focus on biological principles from molecular biology and physiology that are used in forensic science. Topics will include the biological basis of individuality, the application of genetics in the design and interpretation of a variety of forensic tests, and the effects of drugs, other chemicals and biological agents on human physiology. Occasional required field trips. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week.
Prerequisites: An Introductory Biology Lab sequence; CHE213

Credits: 4.00

BIO 340: General Pathology

An introduction to the basic concepts of human disease, manifestations of disease, and diseases of major organ systems integrated with normal anatomy and physiology. Required of students in the Nuclear Medicine Technology concentration. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites: BIO201, CHE213.

Credits: 3.00

BIO 341: Biology of Marine Mammals

A course that explores the biological diversity of marine mammals. Special attention is given to comparison of structural, physiological and behavioral adaptations found in the different groups, including whales, seals, manatees, and sea otters. Some discussion of commercial utilization and conservation is included. Occasional weekend field trips may be required. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites: An Introductory Biology Lab sequence, or permission of the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

BIO 344: Underwater Research Methods

This course is designed to introduce scuba certified students to research methods used in the study of biology, ecology and physiology of subtidal organisms. Current underwater research methods are taught and implemented in underwater exercises. Potential topics for lectures and labs include: diving physics, physiology, dive planning, first aid for diving professionals, sampling designs, statistical analysis, underwater photography, population census methods and fish habitat surveys. This course fulfills the American Academy of Underwater Sciences (AAUS) scientific diver training requirements. Three lecture hours and one four hour lab per week.
Prerequisites: Basic Open Water Scuba certification, an Introductory Biology laboratory sequence; or permission of Department Chairperson. Students must supply their own scuba equipment.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 345: Introduction to Aquaculture

Students explore the biological, sociological and economical constraints to the culture of finfish and shellfish. Procedures used to culture finfish and shellfish commercially in the United States are emphasized, although globally important species and procedures are covered. Local species are used to illustrate concepts and effective techniques. Students learn how to sample and culture aquatic organisms, and to maintain their aquatic environment. Water quality, proper nutrition and prevention and control of diseases are examined. Proper use and storage of equipment and supplies are practiced. Three lecture hours per week. One three-hour laboratory per week. One or two weekend field trips may be required.
Prerequisite: An introductory Biology laboratory sequence plus CHE130, or permission of the Department Chairperson. Not open to students who have completed BIO203 or BIO205.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 400: Neuroanatomy

This course will provide students with a solid background in the anatomic and functional divisions of the human nervous system. Major areas of focus will be on the general organization of the nervous system, development and histogenesis, architecture of the central nervous system (CNS), applied Neuroanatomy, and clinical manifestations. Intended for students majoring in Occupational Therapy. Occasional field trips, perhaps on a weekend, may be scheduled. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: BIO201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 401: Vertebrate Evolution

The biology of vertebrates is used to demonstrate the enormous adaptability of this varied group of animals. Studying specific structural and physiological adaptations within the major classes of vertebrates, the evolutionary history and adaptation of vertebrates to a wide variety of habitats is demonstrated. Three lecture hours per week. Offered in alternate years, spring semester only.
Prerequisite: BIO220, or BIO305, or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

BIO 402: Genetics

The study of the hereditary material-how it changes, how it is transmitted, and how it provides information to the cell. Topics to be discussed include classical genetic theory, and introduction to the biochemistry of nucleic acids, genome organization, gene regulation and expression, population genetics, and the role of genetic change in evolutionary processes. Four lecture hours per week. This course can be used as a Q and W course in the current curriculum.
Prerequisites: BIO212, CHE213, or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

BIO 406: Microbiology

Fundamental aspects of microbes with respect to identification and cultivation are studied. Lecture topics include a survey of the groups of microbes, and focus on the metabolic and genetic capabilities of the bacteria and viruses. Laboratory procedures acquaint the student with the preparation of culture media, aseptic technique, manipulation, identification and control of microbes, and will include specialized areas of microbiology such as food and environmental microbiology. Three lecture hours and two two-hour laboratories per week.
Prerequisites: BIO 212, CHE 212 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 407: Directed Study in Biology

This course will consist of readings in particular areas of Biology, under the direction of a staff member. Students wishing to register for this course must make prior arrangements with the Department Chairperson and the faculty member involved. Minimum of three hours per week for each credit awarded. Open only to Junior and Senior Biology Majors.

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00

BIO 408: Research in Biology

Research direction and participation in any area of Biology of interest to the student and for which a faculty specialist is available. Requires prior arrangements with and the approval of the Department Chairperson and supervising faculty member. Time, space and equipment availability necessarily limits openings to this course. A final paper detailing work performed and conclusions reached is required. Open only to Junior and Senior Biology Majors.

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00

BIO 408N: Research in Biology

Research direction and participation in any area of Biology of interest to the student and for which a faculty specialist is available. Requires prior arrangements with and the approval of the Department Chairperson and supervising faculty member. Time, space and equipment availability necessarily limits openings to this course. A final paper detailing work performed and conclusions reached is required. Open only to Junior and Senior Biology Majors.

Credits: 1.00 - 3.00

BIO 409: Biological Chemistry

A molecular view of the living cell, including a survey of energy transformations, catalysis, synthesis, and intermediary metabolism. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: BIO 212, CHE 131, and CHE 212, or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 411: Immunology

The structural and functional organization of the immune system and the cellular, molecular, and genetic bases of antibody-mediated and cell-mediated immunity. Transplantation immunology, tumor immunology, and immunopathology. Four lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites: BIO212 and CHE213 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 412: Endocrinology

Studies of hormone-producing tissues and their role in coordinating homeostatic mechanisms. An overview of endocrine systems with emphasis on the mechanisms of hormone action. Four lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites: BIO131-132, or BIO103, and CHE212-213 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 415: Biology Seminar

Student oral presentations and written reports on topics in Biology based on recent publications or projects in which the student has had significant personal involvement. Open only to Seniors. Required of Senior Biology Majors, except those in the Environmental Biology or Nuclear Medicine Technology concentrations. Three hours per week. Not open to students who have completed BIO415N. Prerequisite/Corequisite: W-II course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

BIO 416: Biology Internship

An opportunity for students to gain practical or technical training in biology by working at such facilities as laboratories, museums, government agencies or biologically oriented businesses. The student makes necessary arrangements with the chosen facility, in consultation with an appropriate faculty member. Open only to Junior or Senior Biology Majors.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00 - 12.00

BIO 421: Comparative Animal Physiology

A comparative approach to the functional adaptations of animals to diverse environments, with emphasis on underlying physiological and biochemical mechanisms. This course examines the ways that diverse animals perform similar physiological functions. Topics covered include energy metabolism, feeding, digestion, thermal biology, osmotic relations, respiratory exchange, circulation, excretion, and neural biology. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: BIO212 and CHE131 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

BIO 700: Research Methods in Teaching Science research Methods in Teaching Science

This course will enable the student to select and implement appropriate methodologies for conducting research in the teaching of science and to report the results of such research. It will also include methods of investigation and techniques for interpreting the appropriate professional literature. Three lecture/discussion hours per week and occasional field trips.

Credits: 3.00

BIO 706: Estuarine Ecology

This course provides an overview of estuarine environments, where freshwater meets saltwater. Interactions between the physical, chemical and biological components of an estuarine environment are explored and illustrated by field experiences. Participants gain a hands-on appreciation of the dynamic nature and ecological importance of estuarine environments. Emphasis is on methods for data collection and investigations appropriate for the classroom. This intensive 50-hour course may include field time outside of scheduled hours.
Prerequisites: Two upper-level undergraduate courses in biology or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

NMT 200: Introduction to Nuclear Medicine Technology

This course provides an introduction to the career of Nuclear Medicine Technology with an emphasis on the daily activities expected of an NMT professional. Lecture topics are designed to orient the student to the clinical environment, and will include the role of the Nuclear Medicine Technologist in the diagnosis of pathological disease. Two full day field visits are included in this course which allow the student to observe the activities that take place in the hospital Nuclear Medicine laboratory. Limited to Biology Majors with an NMT concentration.
Prerequisites: BIO 201, CHE 213.
Co-requisite: BIO 340.

Credits: 1.00

NMT 401A: Nuclear Medicine Clinical Practicum I (summer)

Assignment to Nuclear Medicine Department of affiliated hospital for 10 weeks (5 days per week). Program includes participation in performing diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures under direction of affiliated physician. Participation in nuclear medicine educational programs and other teaching programs of the respective hospital. Limited to Nuclear Medicine Technology concentration students.
Prerequisites: BIO340, CHE212-CHE213.

Credits: 3.00

NMT 402: Nuclear Medicine Clinical Practicum II

Assignment to Nuclear Medicine Department of affiliated hospital for 15 weeks (5 days each week). Program includes participation in performing diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures under direction of affiliated physician. Participation in nuclear medicine educational programs and other teaching programs of the respective hospital.
Prerequisite: NMT401A.

Credits: 4.00

NMT 403: Nuclear Medicine Clinical Practicum III

Assignment to Nuclear Medicine Department of affiliated hospital for 15 weeks (5 days each week). Program includes participation in performing diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures under direction of affiliated physician. Participation in nuclear medicine educational programs and other teaching programs of the respective hospital.
Prerequisites: NMT402, NMT410A, NMT420.

Credits: 4.00

NMT 405: Nuclear Medicine Technology I

The basics of radiochemistry, radiopharmacy, and radiation safety will be covered in this course. State and federal regulations, and guidelines will be explained. The students will be familiarized with safe handling techniques and concepts. Radiation unit, genetic and somatic effects and carcinogenesis are include. Radiopharmaceutical production, generator systems and quality control techniques are given particular emphasis. Demonstration of equipment included. Four lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: NMT 401A

Credits: 4.00

NMT 411: Nuclear Medicine Technology II

This is a review of the anatomy, physiology and pathology of all organ systems with correlation of appropriate diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures and comparison to other modalities of patient investigation for diagnosis. Image evaluation and problems solving techniques are covered. Four lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites: NMT402, NMT405, NMT420.

Credits: 4.00

NMT 415: Nuclear Medicine Seminar

Seminar assignment of a Nuclear Medicine problem for study; definition of the problem; derivation of information; review of literature; statistical analysis; formal written presentation of results; and discussion. Limited to Nuclear Medicine Technology concentration students in their Senior year. One hour per week.

Credits: 1.00

NMT 420: Nuclear Instrumentation

The course includes principles and theory of imaging systems including but not limited to gamma camera systems, PET scanners, hybrid scanners, survey equipment, well counters, liquid scintillation counters, single/multi channel analyzers, and dosimetry. Four lecture hours per week.
Co-requisites: NMT402 and NMT410A

Credits: 4.00

NMT 435: Advanced Imaging and Therapeutics

The course covers the advanced imaging and therapeutics used in nuclear medicine or modalities associated with nuclear medicine. Positron Emission Tomography (PET), computerized Tomography and other imaging modalities are taught along with cross-sectional anatomy to evaluate the procedures and techniques used to diagnose and treat diseases. Advanced therapeutic procedures and isotopes are reviewed along with the prognosis of patient scenarios. Immunology related to the in-vivo and in-vitro procedures are reviewed as well. Four lecture ours per week.
Prerequisites: NMT402, NMT405, NMT420.

Credits: 4.00

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