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History

HST 101: World History I

A systematic study of the major patterns of global history from its origins through the early modern period. Analyzes the distinguishing characteristics of the world's major pre-modern civilizations and the relationships and points of cultural exchange among them. Examines the historical roots of many of the world's diverse cultural traditions. This course develops critical thinking, writing and analytical skills. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS101.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: The Human Past, World Cultures

HST 102: World History II

A systematic study of the major patterns of global history in the modern period. Analyzes the distinguishing characteristics of the world's major civilizations, and the gradual integration of the diverse cultures of the world into an interconnected system. This course develops critical thinking, writing, and analytical skills. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: The Human Past, World Cultures

HST 104: Conquest, Slavery and Revolution in the Atlantic World

This course examines the interconnected history of the Atlantic World that took place on the ocean and on four continents from the age of exploration in the fifteenth century to the abolition of slavery in the nineteenth century. The collision of old worlds produced conflict but in the process it would ultimately create an interconnected community of diverse peoples and cultures, the beginnings of globalization. The course will consider a wide range of topics including exploration, colonization, commerce, migration, slavery, creole societies, revolution and piracy. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: The Human Past, World Cultures

HST 105: Colonialism and the Making of the Modern World

Through film, fiction, history, and reporting, this course will look at how colonialism shaped the divided world we live in today. We will discuss political economic, cultural, and environmental impacts of colonialism and the development of underdevelopment. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: The Human Past, World Cultures

HST 106: Global History Since 1900

This course is an introduction to world history since 1900. Students will examine topics and themes in modern history and explore the diverse cultural, social, political and economic transformations leading to our increasingly globalized world. Topics may include capitalism, colonialism, anti-colonialism, race, democracy, world war, nationalism, ethnicity, genocide, the Cold War, human rights, technological development and globalization. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: The Human Past, World Cultures

HST 107: The United States in World History

This course explores the transnational history of the United States in the modern global era. Students will examine the roots of globalization, from the earliest migrations across the Bering Straits, the origins and development of colonization and imperialism, up through the foundations for the modern "American empire." They will explore the dominant historical themes that trace the origins and development of the hemisphere's encounters, connections, and relationships with the peoples and environments of Asia, Africa, and Europe.Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: The Human Past, World Cultures

HST 108: War and Society in World History

This course explores war from antiquity to the present as a cultural, social and political phenomenon. The course emphasizes the influence of ideological and religious factors on attitudes towards war, the relationship between war and social change, the interaction and exchange between cultures that is often produced by war, the links binding war and technology with political power and economics, and the historic and seminal influence of war on the creative and expressive realms of art, cinema and literature. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: The Human Past, World Cultures

HST 109H: Honors World History

This course examines themes in world history focusing on patterns of interaction, comparative developments, the diffusion of ideologies and technologies, and the formation of a global community. Course themes will vary with instructor, but be placed in a global context continuously. Readings, discussions, and source analysis will aid in the assessment of historical phenomena from varied perspectives. Three lecture hours

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: The Human Past

HST 112: Introduction to Lgbtq History

This course is an introduction to the study of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender intersex, and queer histories; this course is also a first-level writing course. Focusing on the national as well as the global, this course takes an interdisciplinary approach in pulling together various artifacts and texts to fully investigate LGBTQ history, experiences identities, and cultures. The interdisciplinary approach facilitates instruction in foundational critical reading and writing practices including the ability to summarize, paraphrase, evaluate, analyze, and synthesize texts. Three lecture hours.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level I

HST 128: Global Societies and Cultures

This course studies global societies and cultures. The course analyzes social and cultural transformations at various stages of the modern era. It pays particular attention to the cultural continuations, social changes, and global interactions around the world. Relating to students' own cultural backgrounds, this course guides the students to develop comparative views of all cultures. Through evidence-based learning, this course leads the students to understand why social relations and social institutions generally reflect cultural norms as well as how deviations take place that aim at establishing new societies based upon new cultures.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society, World Cultures

HST 200: Historiography

The course is an introduction to philosophies of history and recent developments in methodology, with consideration given to interpretative trends and conflicting schools of historical writing. Students are required to complete an historiographical project. Required of all History majors. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS402 or who have taken HIS290.
Prerequisite: Level I Written Communication (W-I) course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level II

HST 204: U.s. History and Constitutional Government I

This course traces the development of the United States from the colonial period to the end of the Civil War, surveying the economic, political, social and cultural aspects of this development. Constitutional development at the national and state levels will be explored, with particular emphasis on the Massachusetts experience. This course provides the matrix for courses in American Literature, Education, Economics, Government and Sociology. Three lecture hours per week. Fulfills Massachusetts's teacher certification American Government requirement. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS204.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: The Human Past

HST 205: U.s. History and Constitutional Government II

Traces the development of the United States from 1865 to its present status as a world power, analyzing the economic, political, social and cultural factors. The functioning of American federal and state constitutions is analyzed. Provides the knowledge and understanding needed by teachers and by professionals who may interact with the public sector. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS205.

Credits: 3.00

HST 210: Legal History

A one-semester course examining the historical development of the fundamental concepts of Anglo-American law. These concepts include subject areas covered in the first year law school curricula: real and personal property, torts, contracts, criminal law, courts and procedural rules. The substantive and procedural aspects of the common law are traced and the significance of the developments in statutory law is explained. The historical background of modern landlord-tenant statutes and of consumer law remedies is also covered. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS210.

Credits: 3.00

HST 216: History of the African American I

Traces African American roots from the early kingdoms in West Africa to the American Civil War. Emphasis will be placed on the socio-historical processes that account for the status of Blacks in American society and the New World. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS326.

Credits: 3.00

HST 217: History of the African American II

Analysis of the period from Reconstruction to the present. Special emphasis will be put on the role of charismatic Black leaders and theoreticians of the 1920's and their impact on the development of the ideologies of the 1960's. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS327.

Credits: 3.00

HST 218: U.s. Women's History

U.S. Women's History presents women's history both as an integral part of United States history and as a distinct subject of historical inquiry. Using a variety of sources, this course will explore the public and private lives of U.S. women of different class, racial, ethnic, and religious backgrounds from the colonial period to the present. The course will also introduce students to the methodology of women's history. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS363 or HIS363A.

Credits: 3.00

HST 237: History of the Middle East

An introduction to the history and culture of the Middle East from the rise of Islam in the seventh century to the present. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS301.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: The Human Past, World Cultures

HST 239: History of Latinos in the United States

This course examines the history of the different Latino populations of the United States, beginning with U.S. expansion in the nineteenth century. We explore the history of Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Dominicans and Central Americans in the United States in the context of U.S. relations with the sending countries (Mexican-American War, Spanish-American War, Dominican and Central American occupations), and changes over time in U.S. society and economy. The historical construction of race and ethnicity, gender, and changing forms of identities is also examined. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS380.

Credits: 3.00

HST 240: History of China

The course covers the Chinese civilization from ancient to modern times. It summarizes major historical events; stresses the internal and external struggles of China; concentrates on politics, economy, culture, and society; and analyzes China's role in international affairs. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS304.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: The Human Past, World Cultures

HST 242: History of Japan

This course provides a general historical coverage of Japan. It discusses Japanese political changes, economic development, and cultural transformation. The course searches for answers to the fundamental questions regarding the essence of the Japanese society. In a time when the roads are filled with Japanese cars, it is also necessary to understand the people who contribute to making Japan an important country in both Asia and the world. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS385.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: The Human Past, World Cultures

HST 250: History of Africa I

This course presents the account of: ancient history of Africa, the Arab conquest, modern changes in North Africa, tribal life south of the Sahara, impact of European imperialism, contemporary developments in the emerging nations. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS330.

Credits: 3.00

HST 251: History of Africa II

This course is concerned with modern African history with emphasis on the rise and fall of the European colonial empires, and the emergence of the new African states. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS331.

Credits: 3.00

HST 256: Modern India

Through lecture and discussion, the student is introduced to major events and themes in the modern history of India, from the rise of the Mughal Empire in the 16th century to the colonial period of the late 18th and 19th centuries, the decades of the freedom struggle in the early 20th century, and the rapid political and socio-economic changes that have occurred since partition and independence in 1947. The course emphasizes, in addition to important political changes, aspects of cultural and economic history. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have taken HIS 396.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: The Human Past, World Cultures

HST 269: Introduction to European History

The course introduces students to the European experience by examining broad historical themes. Emphasis will be placed on how historians have organized and interpreted major developments throughout various periods in European history. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS220.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: The Human Past

HST 270: Medieval Europe

This course covers the history of Europe from the time of the fall of the Roman Empire to the invading Germanic, Slavic, and Hunnic tribes, to the time of the Renaissance with its major contributions to civilization. Three lecture hours per week. Offered in alternate years. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS306.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: The Human Past

HST 271: Renaissance and Reformation

Studies the changes in European culture, religion, economics, and politics from the 15th through the 17th centuries. The art, literature, and economic evolution of the Renaissance, as well as the theological and political differences of the Protestant and Catholic Reformations will be stressed. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS307.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Creative Expression & Apprec, The Human Past

HST 272: History of France Since 1763

Covers the political and economic as well as social developments from 1763 to the present. Beginning with the era of the French Revolution, the course will introduce students to the events which have shaped contemporary France. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS333.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: The Human Past, Written Communication-Level II

HST 273: History of Modern Germany

A survey of modern German History. Examines the complexities of modernIzation during the Bismarkian and Wilhelmine eras, Germany's role in World War I, the "crisis years" of Weimar, the social, cultural and political dimensions of Nazism, the Third Reich and the Holocaust; the nature of a divided Germany and the implications of reunification in the contemporary era. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS334A. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS334B.

Credits: 3.00

HST 277: England to the 17th Century

A survey of English life from the Roman invasion to the death of Elizabeth I. Analysis of major political and economic developments. Particular emphasis placed on social history from Chaucer's time to that of Shakespeare to provide a background for the study of English literature. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS350.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: The Human Past

HST 279: Russian History

The development of Russia from Pre-Kievan and Kievan time to the establishment of Soviet Russia. The student is encouraged to build an understanding of modern Russia by pursuing appropriate readings. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS310.

Credits: 3.00

HST 281: The Cultural Revolution, Tiananmen Movement, and Economic Growth in Contemporary China

This course provides an overview of contemporary China. It examines the political changes, economic progresses, and cultural transformations in recent and current China. Focusing on three most important events as case studies, the course tries to lead the students into a strongly evidence-based understanding of the origins, developments, and consequences of these important moments in contemporary China. The Cultural Revolution of 1966-1976 illustrated how ideological fanaticism could produce chaotic impacts upon human behaviors in the Chinese attempt to create a new culture. The Tiananmen Movement of 1989 demonstrated Chinese students and citizens' call for changing China's social/political institution towards democracy. The open door and economic growth in the 1990's and into the 21st century have dramatically improved the Chinese living standard that help formulate a new world view for the Chinese to stress the rising significance of China on the world stage. This course also requires students to compare contemporary China with their own societies and cultures in order to foster a comparative global perspective. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society, World Cultures

HST 285: The History of Ancient Greece

This course examines the history of Greece from the Mycenaean kingdoms to he Hellenistic age and all the triumphs and tragedies that lay between. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: The Human Past

HST 286: The History of Rome

This course examines the history and culture of ancient Rome from the origins of the city to the disintegration of the western empire, tracing along the way the reasons for its meteoric rise and spectacular fall. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: The Human Past

HST 287: Northern Europe to 1066

This course examines the history of the Celtic, Germanic, and other peoples of Northern Europe from the Bronze Age to the Norman Conquest of Anglo-Saxon England. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: The Human Past

HST 290: People and Environment in Latin America

Environmental history looks at the relationships between humans and the natural environment over time. This course looks at people and environment in Latin America over the past 500 years, from indigenous societies through conquest and colonial rule, independence, export-led growth, import-substitution industrialization, and the new extractivism. We will look at mining, agriculture, and industry, at production and consumption, and at Latin America's relationships with the United States and the rest of the world in terms of people, their work, and the environment. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: The Human Past, Pers Growth & Responsibility

HST 299: Samurai, Geisha, Emperor, and Concubine: Chinese and Japanese Historical Movies and Novels

This course provides an opportunity for students to be exposed to diverse worldviews of the best-known Chinese and Japanese historical movies and novels. Based upon historical knowledge, the course leads the students to experience critical studies of the most popular Chinese and Japanese historical movies and novels in order to appreciate their artistic creativity and cultural aestheticism. The students also compare East Asian historical movies and novels with those of their own cultures in order to find similarities and differences. Using fictional writing and movie making as mediums, the course guides the students to acquire necessary strategies and skills as well as applying them to writing short historical fictions or making short historical movie clips as their final assignments for the course. The student are given chances to present their works on or off campus. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Creative Expression & Apprec, World Cultures

HST 300: Introduction to Museum Work

Using regional museums, this course focuses on relevant topics intended to introduce the student to the place of museums in society and education. Various facets of museum operation will be highlighted. Attention will be given to career opportunities existing in museum work. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS375.

Credits: 3.00

HST 301: Introduction to Archaeology

An introduction to the theory, methods, and goals of archaeology in the Old and New Worlds. Topics include the history of the discipline, excavation and the interpretation of archaeological remains, the uses of documents, dating techniques, and the examination of several Old and New World cultures. Three lecture hours per week. Offered annually. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS376.

Credits: 3.00

HST 305: Topics in Public History

This course features intensive examination of a specialized topic in public history. It emphasizes readings that reflect fresh trends in research strategies or interpretive directions. The professor will determine selection of the course topic. There may be field trips associated with this course. Three lecture hours per week. This course can be repeated for credit.

Credits: 3.00

HST 307: American Colonial History

Stresses the development of the 13 English colonies to 1776. Topics will include the French settlements in Canada; the colonial wars; the Spanish settlements in the South; and the independence movement in the English colonies. The New England colonies will receive particular emphasis. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS314.

Credits: 3.00

HST 309: Depression and World War in U.s. History

A survey of American economic, social, intellectual, diplomatic, military, and political developments during the period from 1900 to 1945. Topics include Progressivism, world war, Jim Crow racism, women's suffrage, labor and industrialization, the stock market, the Great Depression, and the New Deal. Elective for Peace Studies Minor. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS317A.

Credits: 3.00

HST 311: Historical Heritage of the North Shore

An historical investigation of Massachusetts' North Shore during the most critical periods of national history. Particular interest is focused on the unique experiences of the various towns and cities. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS320.

Credits: 3.00

HST 315: Civil War and Reconstruction

Analysis of the period 1787-1877, focusing on the causes, course and consequences of the American Civil War. Notes changing historical interpretations of social, economic, political and military events. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS324.

Credits: 3.00

HST 318: Era of the American Revolution

Examines the causes and development of the American Revolution. Beginning with an analysis of the political culture of the British North American colonies and the imperial structure, it traces the strains, which emerged between the imperial center and colonial peripheries. State and federal constitution making during the "Critical Period" and post-revolutionary development will be considered. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS343.

Credits: 3.00

HST 320: History of the American Family

This course traces the roots of the American family from colonial time to the present. Early patterns of character from Europe, Africa, and Asia will be examined. Major treatment of the changing nature of society will shed light on the modern American family of today. Students will have the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to explore their own family genealogy. The course will feature guest speakers, films, and related field trips. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS354.

Credits: 3.00

HST 324: Window to the Past: Introduction to Oral History

An introduction to the methodology of oral history and its relationship to contemporary historical investigation. Students will develop technical mastery through classroom presentation and by conducting interviews with individuals who are knowledgeable about the topic under investigation. Interviews will be deposited in an appropriate historical archive. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS360.

Credits: 3.00

HST 328: Manuscripts and Archives: An Introduction to Archive Principles and Practices

As an introduction to the preservation of manuscripts and archival principles, emphasis is on procedures and policies which are intended to protect unique documents containing valuable historical evidence. The course provides students with practical experience. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS370.

Credits: 3.00

HST 332: Architectural History of America: An Introduction

An overview of the built environment in the United States from colonial settlement to late 19th century. The course will examine how buildings related to American history. Emphasis is placed on the architecture of New England. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS377.

Credits: 3.00

HST 333: American Material Culture: An Introduction

This course covers the identification, classification, and interpretation of the artifacts and decorative arts of America. Particular attention will be paid to artifacts produced before 1860, and to how these objects are interpreted by archaeologists, historians and museum professionals. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS378.

Credits: 3.00

HST 345: African Americans in the Jazz Age 1919-1941

This course examines the development and social construction of black America during the Interwar Period with emphasis on black cultural production, social thought, political protest, and community development. Attention is given to the ways black Americans have been active historical agents in their creation and United States History. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS383.

Credits: 3.00

HST 346: African American Freedom Struggles 1941-present

This course traces black Americans' struggle for equality since the 1930's with emphasis on the post-World War II period. It focuses on the individuals and social trends that laid the groundwork for change by the mid twentieth century. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS384.

Credits: 3.00

HST 360: Topics in American History

The course features intensive examination of a specialized topic in American History. It emphasizes readings that reflect fresh trends in research strategies or interpretive directions. The professor will determine selection of the course topic. Three lecture hours per week. This course may be repeated for additional credits.

Credits: 3.00

HST 376: History of South Africa

This course explores South Africa's history from early man to the post-apartheid period. Its focus is the origins and development of the ideology and practice of segregation and the internal and external factors contributing to feelings of racial superiority and exclusiveness. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS368.

Credits: 3.00

HST 377: East Africa: the Past As Present

This course seeks to provide an introduction to the history of East Africa, principally the modern states of Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. Special attention will be devoted to issues of multi-cultural contacts at frontiers of exchange, involvement in the modern world system, imperialism and neo-colonialism. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS369.

Credits: 3.00

HST 382: The Pacific War, 1931-1945

The course focuses on the Pacific War in Asia, an important but often neglected part of the Second World War. It tries to answer some lingering questions. What were the Japanese motivations and justifications? What were the Japanese and Chinese experiences in the war? How did the war change the Asian-Pacific region? The course includes many new materials to inspire the students to rethink the war critically. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS386.

Credits: 3.00

HST 383: Cold War in Asia, 1945-1989

This course examines the Cold War in Asia. It provides a general survey of its historical development, as well as probing deeply into Cold War cases such as the Korean War and the Vietnam War. The course offers particular coverage of Asian perspectives. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS387.

Credits: 3.00

HST 384: History of United States-east Asian Relations

The course examines key issues in the United States-East Asian relations, including American trade with China, Matthew Perry's mission to Japan, the Open Door policy, immigration, the Pacific War, and post-Cold War economic exchanges. The course explains policy initiatives of East Asian countries, as well as the U.S. role in the Pacific. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS388.

Credits: 3.00

HST 385: Topics in Asian History

This course examines specialized topics of Asian history. The professor will determine the geographic content, time periods, and thematic fields of the course. This course may be repeated or credit with the permission of the department chairperson. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

HST 386: Partition and the Making of Postcolonial India and Pakistan

This course examines the origins, events and outcomes of the Partition of South Asia (1947) into two separate and independent nations, India and Pakistan. It considers the political, social, economic, and cultural dimensions of this traumatic and turbulent history from 1947 to present day. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

HST 433: The First World War and European Culture

Examines the intellectual, cultural, and social impact of the First World War on Europe. Explores the prewar atmosphere of Europe, the long-term and immediate causes of war, the multiple experiences of combatants and noncombatants during the war, and the social, literary, and cultural movements and ideas emerging from these wartime experiences. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS315.

Credits: 3.00

HST 438: Europe in the Age of Enlightenment

This course examines the history of Europe from the Glorious Revolution to the French Revolution, considering in particular the critique of Old Regime Europe offered by the Enlightenment. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS372.

Credits: 3.00

HST 439: The French Revolution and Napoleon, 1789-1815

This course will examine the history of the French Revolution and Napoleonic Era in France, considering as well the effects of both on their European and world contexts. Offered bi-annually. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS374.

Credits: 3.00

HST 442: World War II in Europe

This course examines the diplomatic, military, political, social and cultural dimensions of World War II in Europe. It analyzes the origins, events and outcomes of the war in Europe and explores how this central twentieth century event transformed Europe's diverse peoples, its identity and its place in the world. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS352.

Credits: 3.00

HST 444: A Generation in Revolt: Transnational History of the 1960's

Examines the intellectual, cultural, and social history of the decade of the 1960's in a comparative context. Focusing primarily on Europe and the United States, but referencing other world areas, the course explores the roots of the sixties rebellion, the political, social and cultural dimensions of its counterculture, the conservative response to radical change and the broader impact of the 1960's on contemporary ideas, politics, society and culture. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS382.

Credits: 3.00

HST 445: Magic and Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe

This course examines the origins, characteristics, and end of the "witch craze" of sixteenth and seventeenth-century Europe. The course will set the witch craze in its widest historical context by examining the religious, social, intellectual, economic, demographic, and political trends of the period, as well as the general roles played by magic and superstition in early modern society. Particular emphasis will be placed on the role of the Reformation in intensifying the witch craze and the Scientific Revolution in bringing about the "decline of magic". Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS361.

Credits: 3.00

HST 449: Ottoman History, 1281-1923

This course examines the history and culture of the Ottoman Empire. It will explore the origins and expansion of the Turkic warrior dynasty, the establishment and structure of the imperial Islamic state system, the contours of Ottoman society, economic decline, and disintegration of the Empire. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS391.

Credits: 3.00

HST 450: History of the Balkans I: 1453-1804

This course examines the history of Southeastern Europe from the fall of the Byzantine Empire to the Balkan national movements in the early nineteenth century. Albeit one emphasizing culture and society, this course will also address the major political and diplomatic developments affecting the region. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS392.

Credits: 3.00

HST 451: History of the Balkans Ii: 1804-1923

Emphasizing the consequences of nationalism, as well as regional and Great Power politics, this course will examine the revolutionary movements, state formation, and nation-building processes that marked the emergence of the modern Balkan states. Diplomacy and conflict will also be explored. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS393.

Credits: 3.00

HST 452: Byzantine History and Civilization

This course examines the history and civilization of the Byzantine Empire. It will trace the origins, ideology, life, and culture of this influential and complex polity and society - one based on the continuity of Roman statehood and identity within the medieval Greek and Orthodox worlds. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS390.

Credits: 3.00

HST 454: Tudor-stuart England

The course surveys English history during the Tudor-Stuart era (1485-1714), focusing on the English Reformations, the English Revolutions, and the formation of the British Empire. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

HST 461: Roman Law

This course examines the origins, structure, and social effects of the Roman legal system in the period of the late republic through the late empire. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

HST 465: The Holocaust

This course examines the Holocaust in the context of modern European history. It examines the roots of anti-Semitism in Europe, the racialism of Nazi ideology and the social, political, and cultural factors leading to the genocide of millions of Jews and other groups during the Third Reich and World War II. The course explores the historical, human and ethical dimensions of this event and engages students on issues such as ethnic diversity and oppression in a specific historical context. Three lecture hours per week

Credits: 3.00

HST 499: Topics in European History

An examination of specialized topics in European history. The emphasis will be on historiographical debates or issues within the topic area and will include advanced historical readings and research. May be repeated for credit, or may be taken by students who have credit for HIS416, with the permission of the Department Chairperson. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

HST 500: Directed Study in History

An individualized program for History majors and minors. An in-depth study of an aspect of history which falls within the expertise of one or more members of the History Department. The form of the program is developed cooperatively between the student and a consenting faculty member. The student may earn up to 6 credit hours by enrolling for 2 semesters. Students from other academic departments may take the course with permission of the History Department Chairperson. Not open to students who have received 6 credits for HIS500.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

HST 501: Internship

A field experience conducted cooperatively by the Department and public/private institutions. While interning, students engage in professional activities relevant to their history studies. The experience provides training and knowledge leading to professional growth. Open to History majors and those minoring in history who have completed 12 History credit hours beyond the World Civilization core requirement. Potential interns need the permission of a qualified Department faculty supervisor and Department Chairperson. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS401.

Credits: 3.00

HST 502: International Study - Travel Seminar

A study/travel course that incorporates a 1-2 week on-site research trip to an international location appropriate to the topic of the course. Topic varies. May be repeated for credit with permission of Department Chairperson. Lab fee. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 403.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: World Cultures

HST 505: Seminar: Research and Writing in History

The seminar will involve examination and analysis of professional materials in journals and books of primary and secondary sources that deal with the process of research and writing a formal history paper. Faculty and peer discussion will also consider analytical and methodological points. Required of all History majors. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS405 or HIS405A.
Prerequisites:W-I, W-I and HIS290 or HST200 (W-II).

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

HST 700: Historiography

The course includes an examination of the mechanics employed in the study, research, and writing of history. The philosophies, techniques, styles, emphases, and interpretations employed by prominent historians through the ages are studied. Lectures, discussions, oral reports, and written papers will be utilized. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 700.
Prerequisite: Permission of the MA History program coordinator.

Credits: 3.00

HST 703: Oral History

This course promotes familiarity with the concepts of oral history and applies its techniques to specific historical situations. Students will have the opportunity, utilizing what they have learned, to pursue investigations within the framework of the class project theme which reflect their own scholarly interests. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 703.

Credits: 3.00

HST 704: History Alive: Using Cultural Resources to Teach History

This course provides teachers of history with practical experience in the utilization of the historical and cultural resource of the Boston metropolitan region. This course also equips educational specialists with knowledge and skills that will aid them in assisting teachers to use their institution's resources most effectively. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 704.

Credits: 3.00

HST 706: Institute: Preserving the Past: Enrichment of the Social Studies Curriculum

This five day institute is intended to introduce teachers to skills, knowledge, and resources which will help them to develop units and programs which will aid students in the development of a solid historical foundation while at the same time helping them to recognize that history is alive and has societal values. This institute will treat a different topic each year. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 706.

Credits: 3.00

HST 707: The Production of History

This course examines how history and memory circulate through public life in modern societies, and how and why the past matters to individuals, groups and institutions. Among the topics we will examine are the relationship between scholarly historians and their publics, historical fiction, genealogy, collecting and memorabilia, debates over textbooks and school curricula, and practices of amateur history and reenactment. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 787.

Credits: 3.00

HST 710: Museum Studies

Drawing upon the activities of many area museums, this course considers a number of aspects of museum development and management and is suitable for students with varied academic interests and work experiences. Among the matters examined are financial management, computerization, exhibit design and development, governance, collections, and organizational policies. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 786N.

Credits: 3.00

HST 713: Introduction to the Public Life of History

This course introduces the history, theory, and practice of public history. It examines the ideas and questions that shape and are shaped by public engagements with the past and the practical concerns that confront public historians and citizens as they explore, examine, interpret and utilize the past. There are no prerequisites.

Credits: 3.00

HST 800: Seminar in Early American History

The course offers opportunities for intensive examination of highly specialized areas of historiographical importance in Early American history. May be repeated for credit with permission of the Department Chairperson. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 912.

Credits: 3.00

HST 801: The American Colonies to 1763

The voyages of exploration and discovery; the establishment of European colonies in the Western Hemisphere; their subsequent political, economic, social and cultural development; and the colonial wars are considered. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 710.

Credits: 3.00

HST 802: The American Revolution, Critical Period and Federalist Era

The place of the American colonies in the British imperial system, its effects on them, and their reaction to imperial policies is included. The causes, events, consequences, and various interpretations of the American Revolution are considered, as are the "Critical Period" under the Articles of Confederation, the adoption of the Constitution, and the Age of Federalism. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 711.

Credits: 3.00

HST 803: Material Culture of Early America

Covers the identification, classification, and interpretation of the artifacts and decorative art of early America. Handcrafted and mass produced materials of both domestic and foreign manufacture will be considered. Focus is on the material culture of New England prior to 1860, and its interpretation by archaeologists, historians and museum professionals. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 790.

Credits: 3.00

HST 809: Topics in American History

The course offers an examination of a specialized topic in American History. It emphasizes intensive analysis of primary sources as well investigation of readings that reflect fresh trends in research strategies or interpretive directions. The instructor will determine selection of the course topic. Three lecture hours per week. This course may be taken up to three times on different topics.

Credits: 3.00

HST 811: The Civil War

This course covers the period from 1848 to 1865 and examines the many factors leading to disunion, the conduct of the war by both the U.S. and Confederate governments, the constitutional questions, the economic and social issues, public opinion and morale. Military affairs will receive only brief consideration. The impact of the war and its meaning will be assessed and the historiography of the period explored. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 713.

Credits: 3.00

HST 812: The Age of Change: the United States, Late 19th and Early 20th Centuries

This course examines the changing American scene between the end of the Civil War and the onset of World War I. Topics such as Reconstruction, the rise of labor, demographic changes, Populism, and Progressivism will be considered in the light of the great alterations in socio-economic practices and ideas which occurred during the period. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 714.

Credits: 3.00

HST 840: Latinos in the United States

History of the different Latino Populations in the United States, beginning with the Nineteenth century wars which brought large portions of Mexico under U.S. control, and tracing the major waves of migration from Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central America. Conditions in the sending countries, U.S. influence, and different immigrant groups' experiences in the United States. A historical perspective on Latino life including identity, work, community, family, and political activism. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 725.

Credits: 3.00

HST 851: War and Society in the Ancient Mediterranean

This course examines the cultures of Ancient Greece and Rome from the perspective of warfare, examining not only how and why these societies made war but how their warfare shaped and was shaped by each society as a whole.

Credits: 3.00

HST 852: The World of Herodotos

Through close and extensive work with Herodotos' Histories, this course examines the growth of Greek democracy, the larger world in which Greek culture emerged, and the confrontation between the Greek city-states and the Persian empire.

Credits: 3.00

HST 855: Late Medieval and Renaissance History

This course is designed to familiarize the students with the major historical events of the period; to illustrate the major historical interpretations through assigned readings and lectures; to develop an awareness of the reasons behind the religious, cultural, political, and economic tensions of the day, with particular stress upon the development of humanism and individualism. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 741.

Credits: 3.00

HST 856: Early Modern England, 1485-1800

This course surveys the civilization of early modern England by tracing the development of English structures, institutions, mentalities and events from the internal strife of the fifteenth-century Wars of the Roses to the external challenges of the eighteenth-century American and French Revolutions. A comparative approach will be utilized, encouraging students to place English developments in a European and global context. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 742.

Credits: 3.00

HST 861: The European Enlightenment and Eighteenth-century Culture

This course will examine the social and cultural history of the eighteenth century giving special attention to the Enlightenment, the intellectual movement that has come to characterize the age. Attention will be given to contemporary and later critiques of this movement. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 810.

Credits: 3.00

HST 862: French Revolution and Napoleonic Empire

This course will explore the French Revolution and Napoleonic Empire through the writing of selected major historians and primary source material. Examples of topics to be discussed include: the origins of the Revolution, the historical debates about the Revolution, the Great Terror, the Directory, the rise of Napoleon, and the French Revolution’s influence in Europe and the Atlantic World. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 811.

Credits: 3.00

HST 871: Russia Since 1917

The course examines the fall of Imperial Russia; the Provisional Government; the Bolshevik Revolution; the Lenin Regime; relations with Germany and the West; the Stalin Regime; the Five Year Plans; World War II; the Cold Wars; changing economic and political conditions; Krushchev; the Sino-Soviet split; the new Regime. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 748.

Credits: 3.00

HST 877: Nazi Germany

This course examines the Nazi era in Germany from 1933-1945. Particular emphasis will be on emergence of Nazism within postwar fascist movements, the political, social and cultural context for the rise and consolidation of Nazism in Germany, the social, cultural and racial ideologies of Nazism and its ultimate defeat in World War II. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 752N.

Credits: 3.00

HST 879: The Holocaust

This course examines the Holocaust in the context of modern European history. It explores the roots of antisemitism in Europe, the racialism of Nazi ideology and the social, political, and cultural factors leading to the genocide of millions of Jews and other groups during World War II. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 797.

Credits: 3.00

HST 899: Select Topics in European History

An examination of specialized topics of European history. The emphasis will be on historiographical debates or issues within the topic area and will include advanced historical readings and research. May be repeated for credit with the permission of the Department Chairperson. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 881.

Credits: 3.00

HST 901: Modern Latin America

Political, economic and social development of Latin America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including problems of economic development, dependency, and poverty and inequality; different forms of social movements, rebellion and revolution; race, gender and ethnicity; U.S.-Latin America relations; and literary and intellectual movements including dependency theory, liberation theology, magical realism, and testimonial literature. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 731R.

Credits: 3.00

HST 906: Themes in the History of Colonial and Modern Africa: 1870-present

This course examines controversial issues in the study of colonial and modern Africa. Themes could include the partition of Africa, collaboration or resistance to European rule, ideologies of domination, settler colonies, exploitation or development, nationalism and decolonization. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 765.

Credits: 3.00

HST 911: Modern China 1800-1949

The course focuses on China between the Opium War of 1840-1842 and the Communist triumph of 1949. It examines many of the key issues that greatly influenced modern Chinese history including Western imperialism, the Talping and Boxer movements, the Republican Revolution, the Nationalist Revolution, the Sino-Japanese War, and the Victory of the Communist Party. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 771N.

Credits: 3.00

HST 912: Contemporary China 1949-present

The course examines the history of the People's Republic. It covers Mao Zedong and the Cultural Revolution, Deng Xiaoping and his reform, as well as recent social, economic, and political transformations that led China into the twenty-first century. The course pays special attention to China and the world community. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 773N.

Credits: 3.00

HST 952: The Cold War in Asia

This course examines the Cold War in Asia, focusing on the interactions between East and Southeast Asia and the United States. It analyzes the Korean War, the Taiwan Strait crisis, the Vietnam War, the Sino-Soviet split, and the US-China rapprochement. Course readings include both original documents and recent interpretations. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 775.

Credits: 3.00

HST 953: Chinese Business and Economic History

This course examines the history of Chinese business and economic development from antiquity to the present. It discusses Chinese business and economic theories as well as their political and social manifestations. The course links business and economic development with social and cultural progress in China.

Credits: 3.00

HST 954: Colonial India

This course offers an introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural dimensions of the history of India under British colonial rule. It also explores the relationship between colonialism and an emerging sense of nationalism in India during the nineteenth and twentieth century. Our goal will be to familiarize ourselves with the main events and themes of colonial history, as well as the historiographical debates in studying this period in India's past.

Credits: 3.00

HST 989: Topics in World History

This course examines literature, themes, theories, concepts and methods of world history, including comparisons of societies and cultural regions, processes of cross-cultural interaction, the development of civilizations, and large-scale patterns that influence historical development on a transregional or global scale. Topics may include colonialism, world system theories, trade, migration, race and ethnicity, gender and disease. May be repeated for credit with permission of the Department Chairperson. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 880.

Credits: 3.00

HST 990: Internship

Individual or group tutorial and supervised field experience in areas such as archival management, historical editing, archaeological preservation, museum exhibition, legal research in public and private repositories. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 795.

Credits: 3.00

HST 991: History Study and Travel Seminar

A study and travel course that incorporates a research trip to a location appropriate to the course. Topic varies. May be repeated for credit with the permission of the Department Chairperson. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 796.

Credits: 3.00 - 6.00

HST 992: Directed Study

An individualized in-depth research under the personal direction of a departmental specialist in an area of choice will be conducted. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 875.

Credits: 3.00

HST 994: Directed Study in Portfolio

The portfolio is a semester long project in which students in the M.A. History Program showcase the work that they have produced, engage in substantive revisions, and create a master narrative (15 – 20 pages) that explains the students historical, political, pedagogical, and philosophical trajectory. The student works closely with a faculty advisor and then has an oral defense with the advisor and two additional faculty members.

Credits: 2.00

HST 995: Research Seminar

This seminar is designed to develop the student's ability to conduct original research and write a formal historical paper, benefiting from both faculty and peer review of work in progress. Required for MA candidates in History.
Prerequisites: HIS700 and completion of 18 credit hours. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 990.

Credits: 3.00

HST 999: Thesis

The content is the same as above, but with an opportunity for more extensive work in the field. This should be selected by students intending to continue toward a doctoral degree. Oral defense of the thesis and area of thesis study is required. A master copy will be retained in Salem State College Library. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 999

Credits: 6.00

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