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GLS 100: Dynamic Earth

This course will help students to develop scientific literacy through exploration of a variety of topics in earth science such as climate and climate change, volcanoes, earthquakes, glaciers, oceans, plate tectonics, water resources, mineral resources, rocks and energy. Three lecture hours and one two-hour laboratory per week.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning Lab

GLS 102: Evolving Earth

This course exposes students to scientific inquiry and develops scientific literacy through an exploration of Earth and its 4.6 billion year history. Topics covered include the origin and evolution of the planet as well as its climate, atmosphere, oceans, and life forms. Students will use modern scientific methods and analytical skills to interpret geologic samples, structures, data, and maps in the context of Earth history. A focus will be placed on the relevance of past Earth events in light of future environmental conditions. Three lecture hours and one two-hour laboratory per week.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning Lab

GLS 103: The Blue Planet

Investigates the broad-scale features and dynamics of the Earth’s oceans. The course is roughly divided amongst the four main disciplines of oceanography: marine geology, marine chemistry, physical oceanography (i.e., circulation), and marine biology. Students will learn that there is much overlap and interdependence between these disciplines. Specific topics include seafloor spreading, marine sediments, salinity, biogeochemical cycles, ocean structure, currents, waves, tides, primary production, marine ecology, marine life, global warming, and marine pollution. Laboratory will provide active, hands-on experiential learning opportunities to complement each topic presented in lecture. Three lecture hours and one two-hour laboratory per week..

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning Lab

GLS 108: Geology in the Movies

This course will introduce students to fundamental concepts and processes in geology including geologic hazards (such as earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis, and sinkholes), environmental issues (such as climate change and groundwater use), and other geologic processes (such as plate tectonics, mass extinction, and origin of life). These topics will be discussed in order to evaluate the appropriateness and accuracy of geology portrayed in movies. Geologic issues that impact society will be explored in-depth. This course is 3 lecture hours per week and will include time outside of lecture to watch movie clips from the required movies.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning

GLS 109: Water Sustainability

Is fresh water a sustainable resource? This course introduces students to the science of water resource sustainability. Using the process of scientific inquiry students will develop hypotheses and methods of testing these hypotheses associated with the hydrologic cycle at the watershed scale with a focus on the question of sustainability, particularly in light of the impact of climate change. Students will measure, analyze, and interpret data on precipitation, surface water flow, groundwater flow, flooding events, and water quality including natural
and human induced impacts on water quality, as well as estuarine environments where fresh water mixes with seawater. Three hours of lecture and two hours of lab per week.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning Lab

GLS 110: Geology of National Parks

Students will explore the geologic processes responsible for creating the unique landscapes preserved in the National Parks System, and how protection of these lands benefits society. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning

GLS 115: Geology of the Solar System

This course considers the origin and evolution of our solar system through methods of scientific inquiry and reasoning. The composition, surficial and internal geologic processes that shape and form the planets and satellites of our solar system are considered. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning

GLS 120: Geology and the Environment

This course exposes students to geological inquiry and methods of exploring the natural world. Students will apply the scientific method and analytical skills to understanding water resources and uses, contamination of surface and groundwater by development, mining and energy exploitation, as well as remediation of contaminated geologic environments. Three lecture hours per week. Intended for students not majoring in Geological Sciences.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning

GLS 130: Geology and Civilization

This course will examine how geological processes and civilization is interconnected and explore the interdependency of humans and their environment. We will look at specific geological processes, such as earthquakes, climate change (droughts and floods), volcanic eruptions, and various Earth resources (minerals, water, soil), and delve into their influence on ancient (and modern) societies’ history, culture, and economic development. Using both Earth’s archive written in rocks and historical records, we’ll decipher how dependent societies to their physical environment.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning

GLS 155: Age of Dinosaurs

The Age of Dinosaurs will expose students to scientific inquiry focusing on current scientific theories and controversies surrounding the evolution and extinction of dinosaurs. The course will emphasize the analysis and interpretation of geological and paleontological data and information as a way of introducing students to earth system history, plate tectonics, surface geology, sedimentary processes, fossilization, evolution, and related topics so that the geological and evolutionary processes that have affected the dinosaurs can be explored.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning

GLS 171H: Honors Evolving Earth

This course exposes students to scientific inquiry through an exploration of the fascinating and ever-changing evolution of Earth and its inhabitants. The scientific methods and analytical skills used to interpret the history of our planet will be practiced in class and lab through the use of interactive exercises and assignments that utilize geological resources such as real-world data, state of the art analytical equipment, and internet resources. Students will be given the opportunity for independent research of past geologic events, class presentations, and the chance to learn from one another. In laboratory, students will work with ancient rocks and fossils and geological maps to uncover the past. One weekend field trip required. Three lecture hours and two hours of laboratory per week. Open only to Honors students. Not open to students who have received credit for GLS102..

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning, Scientific Reasoning Lab

GLS 199: Special Topics in Earth Science

This course is an intensive examination of specialized topics in Earth Science. The emphasis of the course will be interesting and current questions in Earth Science. The topic and instructor will be announced prior to registration. This course may be repeated once for credit. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

GLS 210: Geomorphology

This course is an experiential-based and writing course that focuses on the role of structure, lithology and process in the evolution of landscapes. Three lecture hours and three hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Two Geological Sciences 100-level laboratory courses, or permission of Department Chairperson, and Written Communications Level I course.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level II

GLS 212: Geological Oceanography

Introduction to the geology and geophysics of the oceans emphasizing mechanisms and processes operating in the marine realm. A broad spectrum of marine geology subjects will be covered including the structure, geophysics, rocks, sediments, microfossils, stratigraphy, and history of the ocean basins and margins. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites: One Geological Sciences 100-level laboratory course or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

GLS 216: Rocks & Minerals

This course addresses minerals and rocks of Earth. Students will investigate mineral properties and occurrences, hand specimen and optical properties of igneous and metamorphic minerals and rocks as well as the basic concepts and principles related to the genesis and evolution of igneous and metamorphic rocks and their relation to plate tectonics and magmatic processes. Activities include mineral and rock classification and identification using hand specimens, thin and polished sections, as well as interpretations of phase, discrimination and other types of descriptive diagrams in a project-oriented, experiential format. Three lecture hours per week and three hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Two Geological Sciences 100-level laboratory courses, or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

GLS 235: Forensic Geology

Forensic Geology offers a "hands-on" approach that applies geoforensic and related scientific skills to solving crimes. Students will learn how scientific inquiry is applied in forensic investigations through a series of class and laboratory exercises, and by analyzing details from actual criminal cases. Topics covered focus on ,but are not limited to, the use of geologic material and techniques to solve crimes, such as rocks and minerals, soil, fossils, isotopes, maps, and satellite imagery. The importance of developing critical thinking skills are emphasized throughout the course. Two two-hour sessions of integrated lecture and related activities per week plus two hours of work outside of classroom.
Co-requisite or Prerequisite: GLS100 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning

GLS 253: Geochemistry

This course covers the origin of the elements and their geological significance. Processes affecting the evolution of the Earth's crust and the distribution of the elements in rocks, sediments, soils and waters; geochemical cycles. Students produce computer-generated graphs in regularly assigned projects throughout the semester. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GLS353.
Prerequisite: GLS201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

GLS 322: Petrology

Basic concepts and principles related to the genesis and evolution of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks, their relation to plate tectonics and magmatic processes are studied through a combination of lectures and interspersed experiential activities. Activities include rock classification and identification using hand specimens, thin and polished sections, as well as interpretations of phase, discrimination and other types of descriptive diagrams in a project-oriented, experiential format. Three lecture hours and three hours of laboratory per week. Local required field trips during the school week or weekend.
Prerequisite: GLS221 or GLS216 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

GLS 328: Special Topics in Geology

This course is an examination of specialized topics in Geology. The emphasis of the course will be current geologic questions or new avenues of geologic research using primary scientific literature. The topic and instructor will be announced prior to registration. This course may be repeated once for credit. Three lecture hours per week. Open only to majors in Geological Sciences, all concentrations.

Credits: 3.00

GLS 330: Paleontology

Introduction to the fossil record. Emphasis is on the description and classification of fossils and use of paleontological data to understand the principles of paleoecology, evolution, and biostratigraphy. Three lecture hours and three hours of laboratory per week. Offered alternate years.
Prerequisites: BIO101 or BIO103, GLS201 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

GLS 334: Sedimentary Environments & the Stratigraphic Record

Introduction to the properties of sediments, sedimentary rocks, sedimentary rock sequences, and the principles of stratigraphic correlation. Emphasis is on examining the dynamics of recent sedimentary environments to establish what sediments would look like in the stratigraphic record. In laboratory, students are introduced to techniques of sediment analysis and the classification and identification of sedimentary rocks. Three lecture hours and three hours of laboratory per week. Offered alternate years.
Prerequisites: Two Geological Sciences 100-level laboratory courses or permission of Department Chairperson. GLS210 recommended.

Credits: 4.00

GLS 341: Structural Geology

The study of the processes by which deformation of the earth occurs, and the interpretation of the structures produced by these processes-from submicroscopic to global scales. Three lecture hours and three hours of laboratory per week; occasional local and/or regional field trips (may be during the school week or weekends) may be required.
Prerequisites: Two Geological Sciences 100-level lab courses, MAT150 or equivalent, or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

GLS 342: Tectonics

A systematic treatment of the geology and geophysics of plate tectonics, based on present knowledge of the structure and physical properties of the Earth's interior. Included are present kinematics of plate movements, hypotheses of dynamics (such as mantle convection), global pattern of plates, detailed consideration of processes at plate convergences, paleoplate tectonics and continental drift of the last 200 million years as derived from ocean floor stratigraphy and structure, and inferences on the time of inception of plate tectonics and its role in earlier Earth history. Three lecture hours per week. Offered alternate years.
Prerequisites: One Geological Sciences 100-level laboratory course or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning

GLS 346: Volcanology

Volcanology is the study of volcanoes, magma, lava, types of eruptions and other geological processes that can both benefit and have negative impacts on society. The study of volcanology is broad and comprises the study of any volcanic territory independently of their age and location including but not limited to monitoring active volcanoes. This course will cover the fundamental themes of the origin and evolution of magmas, their chemical and physical characteristics, and their relationship to different type of eruptions and volcanoes. Students will be introduced to theoretical concepts, will be introduced to modern investigative techniques and experience igneous rocks in the field. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites: One Geological Sciences 100-level laboratory course, or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Scientific Reasoning

GLS 356: Hydrology

This course is intended to serve as a core in the basics of surface and groundwater hydrology for environmental science majors. Students taking this course should gain a useful understanding of hydrologic theory and some basic skills used in hydrologic data gathering and analysis. Problem solving, short in-class activities and laboratory projects related to lecture material will enhance the student's understanding of hydrologic concepts. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week.
Prerequisites: One Geological Sciences 100-level laboratory course and MAT150, or permission of department chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

GLS 362: New England Geology

This course explores the bedrock and glacial geology of New England and adjacent regions. Major structural belts, stratigraphy, and tectonic models for past orogenic events are investigated as well as the impact of bedrock geology and geologic structures on New England’s landscape. One or two weekend field trips will be required. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: GLS 102 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

GLS 380: Applied Environmental Geophysics

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of geophysical methods currently used to help solve environmental problems. Methods covered include seismic refraction and reflection, gravity, magnetic, electrical resistivity, electromagnetics, ground-penetrating radar, and radioactivity surveys. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week; occasional local field trips (may be during the school week or weekends) may be required.
Prerequisite: GLS210 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

GLS 400: Directed Studies in the Earth Sciences

Field, laboratory and/or library research in the Earth Sciences. Independent study in the student's field of interest under the supervision of an appropriate faculty member.
Prerequisites: GLS201 and permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 1.00 - 4.00

GLS 470: Field Geology I

This course covers the application of geological field methods including mapping, environmental geophysics, and stratigraphic interpretation to the production of geological maps and technical reports. Several projects stress environmental applications. This course is field based and requires the student to work outdoors at various sites in the Northeast. Additional fee required for field expenses.
Prerequisites: Two Geological Sciences 100-level laboratory courses and one other upper division (200-300-400) Geology course or permission of the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

GLS 485: Field Geology II

This course covers the application of geological field methods including mapping, structural interpretation, and stratigraphic section measurement and interpretation to the production of geological maps. This course is field based and requires the student to work outdoors at various sites in the Yellowstone Plateau of Montana/Wyoming. Additional fee required for field expenses.
Prerequisites: GLS470 and GLS341, or permission of the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

GLS 500: Senior Research in Geology I

This course requires the completion of a substantial research project on a geologic problem or topic under the supervision of an appropriate faculty member. Methods of research, organization, preparation, and presentation of data will be discussed, and the objective is a completed technical report and presentation by the student. The course fulfills the W-III core requirement. Open only to Senior Geological Sciences majors by permission of Department Chairperson. Prerequisites: Written Communications Level II

Credits: 3.00 - 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

GLS 501: Senior Research in Geology II

This course is a continuation of GLS 500 for those students who wish to further pursue their geologic research, particularly in anticipation of publication.
Prerequisites: GLS500. Written Communications Level II (W-II).

Credits: 3.00 - 4.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

GLS 780: Applied Environmental Geophysics

This course examines the theory and practice of geophysical methods currently used to help solve environmental problems. Methods include seismic refraction and reflection, gravity, magnetic, electrical resistivity, electromagnetic, ground-penetrating radar, and radioactivity surveys (Radon). A research paper, case analysis, or individual field project, and a brief presentation are also required.
Prerequisites: GLS100 and PHS211 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 4.00

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