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ECO 115: Money Management Skills

This course will review personal financial issues that individuals face throughout their lives. It will help students manage their personal finances and make better financial decisions It will cover a series of topics including budgeting, saving for short term goals and for retirement banking the importance of credit and debt investing, taxes and how to avoid common financial mistakes.
One lecture hour per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ECO 208N.

Credits: 1.00

ECO 201: Principles of Macroeconomics

This course introduces students to macroeconomic issues, including the factors that determine national income, output, employment, inflation, and interest rates in the United States. Students will discuss the role of savings and consumption, fiscal and monetary policies, and international trade, as well as the impact of policy changes or events. The class will also explore policy debates on topics such as the distribution of income, public debt, and international trade. Three lecture hours per week. Required of all Economics majors and Business Administration majors. Elective for all other majors.
Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the Basic Math Competency requirement.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society, Quantitative Reasoning

ECO 202: Principles of Microeconomics

This course introduces students to microeconomic issues, including the use and limits of the supply and demand model, the role of prices in a market economy, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and the role of government. Students will use economic tools to analyze economic and social problems and evaluate government policies. Three lecture hours per week. Required of all Economics majors and Business Administration majors. Elective for all other majors.
Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the Basic Math Competency requirement.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Contemporary Society

ECO 208N: Economics of Personal Financial Decisions

This course examines the financial choices people face during their lives and provides students the knowledge to make better decisions. Students will learn about spending, saving, taxes, borrowing and credit, investing, insurance, retirement, and other issues, as well as the psychological and institutional forces which shape consumer behavior. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for economics majors and all other majors.
Prerequisite: ECO200 or ECO201 or ECO202.

Credits: 3.00

ECO 301: Intermediate Macroeconomics

This course uses macroeconomic models to study the performance of the United States economy in the short run, medium run, and long run. Students focus on models that examine the relationship between GDP, employment, interest rates, and inflation, as well as the impact of government policies. Three lecture hours per week. Required of all Economics majors. Elective for all other majors.
Prerequisite: ECO201.

Credits: 3.00

ECO 302: Intermediate Microeconomics

This course provides a rigorous intermediate-level treatment of microeconomic theory with applications to business and public policy. Topics include the mathematical foundations of economic theory, the theory of consumer choice, profit maximizing behavior of firms in competitive and imperfectly competitive markets, factor markets, welfare economics and game theory. Three lecture hours per week. Required of all Economics Majors. Elective for Economics Minors.
Prerequisite: ECO202.

Credits: 3.00

ECO 305A: Money, Banking and Financial Markets

This course provides a detailed description of the financial markets, instruments and institutions of the U.S. economy. Emphasis will be placed on domestic debt and equity markets and the implementation of monetary policy by the Federal Reserve Bank. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for Economics majors and minors. Prerequisites: ECO201, ECO202.

Credits: 3.00

ECO 309: Urban Economics

A study of both economic theory and the economic institutions characteristic of urban areas. Problems of urban economics, such as poverty, discrimination, housing, pollution, education, transportation and crime are examined in depth. Three lecture hours per week. This course is offered on a periodic basis. Elective for Economics majors. Distribution III elective for all other majors.
Prerequisite: ECO200 or ECO201 or ECO202.

Credits: 3.00

ECO 313: Economic Development

This course applies economic development concepts and theories to present world economic development issues and problems. Topics covered include the causes and distributional effects of economic growth; migration and urban unemployment; oppression, the welfare effects of technical change; the role of agrarian institutions in the development process; the impact of alternative development policies and strategies on various populations; and poverty and famine in developing countries. This course will increase awareness of growth issues in the context of a multicultural world. Three lecture hours per week. This course is offered on a periodic basis. Elective for Economics majors.
Prerequisite: ECO201 or ECO202 or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

ECO 317: Government Finance

Students will collect and analyze data on government revenue at federal, state, and local levels. The course may cover topics such as: the equity and efficiency of revenue sources, the budget process at different levels of government, theories from political economy or political science, fiscal federalism and the proper role of federal/state/local governments, the causes and impacts of deficits and debt, how government bonds are used to raise revenue, how government finance in Massachusetts compares to other states, and how Proposition 2½ impacts local governments. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for Economics majors. Prerequisite: ECO200, ECO201, or ECO202.

Credits: 3.00

ECO 321: Behavioral Economic

Standard economic theories represent people in ways that are often different from how they actually behave. This course studies the limits of the traditional economic assumption of rational decision making. It will use evidence from psychology and consider social, cognitive and emotional factors that influence the decision of individuals and institutions, including consumers, borrowers and investors. Incorporating these factors can make economic theory and predictions more accurate. In addition, the course will analyze the impact of behavioral economic concepts on markets, investments, and resources allocation. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

ECO 325: Political Economy

This course is an introduction to the field of political economy. The course reviews economic structures and institutions from a historical and political perspective. Additionally, it critically examines economic institutions and their relationship with politics and society. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for economics majors and all other majors. Prerequisites: ECO201 and ECO202.

Credits: 3.00

ECO 330: Economics of Education

This course will use economic tools to analyze a variety of issues related to education These issues include: how and why people make decisions to invest in education; how education affects social and economic outcomes, including inequality; how to evaluate the quality of education at the level of schools or districts as well as for individual teachers: how education is financed in the United States and other countries and the impact of resources on educational quality: and how to design and implement public policies related to education. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: ECO202

Credits: 3.00

ECO 350: Probability and Game Theory

Game theory is the use of mathematical models to analyze strategic choice. The course will cover topics such as the Nash equilibrium, dominant and mixed strategies, extensive and normal form games, auctions, and the theory of moves. Students will analyze games with and without complete information, in both a static and dynamic context. This course will include many economic examples of game theory in practice. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: MAT108, ECO202, and either ODS262 or MAT147

Credits: 3.00

ECO 399: Fed Challenge

Students will work in teams to collect economic data, analyze current economic conditions, and make a recommendation for monetary policy. Their work will require a thorough understanding of economic theory, as well as the policy tools available to the Federal Reserve. Student teams will prepare a presentation that explains their analysis and policy recommendation. One team will compete in the Fed Challenge in Boston and if they win they will compete in the national finals in Washington, D.C. Two lecture hours per week during the first half of the semester. Course may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: ECO301 or permission of department chair.

Credits: 1.00

ECO 400: Econometrics

This course teaches students to use multivariate regressions to analyze data and draw conclusions. Students will collect and organize data, and analyze the data using software such as Excel, SPSS, or STATA. The course will focus on how ordinary least squares regressions can be used to evaluate the relationship between variables, how to interpret the results from regressions, hypothesis testing, and the potential problems with regression analysis. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: ECO301 and ECO302, as well as one of ECO304N, ODS 262, MAT147.

Credits: 3.00

ECO 401: Economic Research

Students will choose an appropriate research topic, locate and explain prior research, develop a hypothesis or economic model, collect and analyze data, test their hypothesis or evaluate their model, and clearly communicate their findings in a well-written paper and in a presentation. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: ECO304N or ODS262 or MAT147 and either ECO301 or ECO302.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

ECO 710: Economics for Managers

This course applies microeconomic and macroeconomic analysis to business decision-making. Emphasis will be on current applications Microeconomic theories of supply, demand, market structure, production, pricing, and game theory will be applied to strategic decisions facing the individual units in the economy. Macroeconomic analysis will focus on DGP growth, inflation, unemployment, trade, monetary policy and fiscal policy in the context of the national and global economic environments within which industries and business operate.

Credits: 3.00

FSC 300: Fire Science Administration

This course is designed to introduce the student to modern management concepts and their relevance to the fire service. It will explore the skills and techniques used by competent management in business, government, and voluntary organizations, with emphasis on their linking to fire science. Decision-making, communications, motivation, leadership, stress and time management, among other management principles will be studied in depth. Three lecture hours per week. FSC major requirement.

Credits: 3.00

FSC 350: Advanced Arson Detection and Prevention

This course studies the problems and techniques of fire investigation, the chemistry of fire, and combustion properties of selected fuels. Emphasis on modern investigative methods and on the application and assistance of various scientific aids available to the fire investigator. Arson prevention programs, their success and/or failure, will be discussed. Three lecture hours per week. FSC major requirement.

Credits: 3.00

FSC 360: Fire Service Law

This course will cover the legal principles that serve as the foundation for proper decision-making and protocol in a fire service organization. Case studies will be used to explain how to avoid problems by learning from the experience of others. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

FSC 370: Managing Community Based Fire Prevention Programs

This course provides fundamental information on the organization and management of a community based fire prevention program with emphasis on the fire prevention bureau structure and functions, the local and state code process, the business of fire prevention, budgeting and cost recovery, and public education. Case studies will be used in this course. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

FSC 380: Managing the Emergency Scene: Principles and Practices

This course will provide an educational foundation to prepare members of the fire service for the structure and accountability required to assume responsibility at an emergency scene. Emphasis will be on proper decision-making strategies and tactics. An important element of this course is the use of case studies to show the application of theory to real world situations. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

FSC 400: Fire and Emergency Services Policy and Research

This course is designed to enable the student to understand the interrelationship between research and practice. Emphasis is placed on the examination of research methodology, the critical appraisal of published research, and the integration of research into evidence-based practice. The course builds on the skills developed in FSC300-Fire Science Administration, helping students strengthen their writing abilities in the Fire Science field. Students will compose in various genres related to the Fire Science field such as incident report writing; incident reviews; injury reporting; apparatus build and specifications; budget presentations and justifications; grant applications; local, state, and federal government communications; and departmental standard operating policies, procedures, and guidelines. Required of FSC majors. Three lecture hours a week.
Prerequisites: FSC300, W-II course

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

FSC 520: Fire Science Research

Students work to translate theory into practice, to apply and gain knowledge, and to experience directly the operations and functions of a Fire Service agency. Fieldwork may assist students in clarifying their career goals and exploring future employment opportunities. Students must be available for eight to ten hours per week for fieldwork and regular meetings or discussions with the Coordinator of Fire Science. Open only for FSC majors.
Prerequisites: FSC300, FSC350. ECO Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

FYEC 100: First Year Seminar (Economics)

This course will introduce students to the experience of academic exploration that is at the heart of a liberal arts education. Through study of one or more compelling questions or topics in a small seminar setting, students will practice creative and critical thinking and will learn to express themselves effectively and appropriately in a college setting. They will develop relationships and practices that allow them to effectively utilize college resources and become members of a community of learners. The specific topic of the seminar will be developed by individual faculty and will be announced in advance. First year seminars are required for first-year students and transfer students with fewer than 15 credits. Not open to students who have received credit for IDS 189 or another first year seminar course.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: First Year Seminar

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