Courses Offered in Criminal Justice | Salem State University Skip to main content

Criminal Justice

CRJ 101: Introduction to Criminal Justice

An introduction to the purpose and functions of the criminal justice system. A description of the police, courts, and corrections on the local, state, and federal levels. Emphasis on the growing problems the criminal justice system has in dealing with the ills of society using a system designed to fit the needs of Colonial America. The introduction to criminal justice is of practical concern to professional personnel involved in the system and also to all citizens who want to understand better the aim of criminal law and how the criminal justice system operates. Three lecture hours per week. CRJ major requirement.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 200: Corrections

This course introduces the student to the historical and philosophical development of what is commonly referred to as "the correctional system". Special emphasis will be given to the structure, administration and nature of institutional and community corrections. Topics may include the inmate subculture, community based treatment programs, and prisoner rights, as well as the societal functions of corrections. Three lecture hours per week. CRJ major requirement.
Prerequisite: CRJ101.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 202: Rehabilitation/habilitation of Ex-offender

This course will present a summary of the approaches to community rehabilitation and an in-depth study of Reality Therapy. This course may be beneficial to students of criminal justice, psychology, social work, nursing, political science and sociology. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for CRJ Majors, Administration Concentration. Free Elective.
Prerequisite: Introductory course in respective major.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 213: Administration of Criminal Justice

Study in administration; analysis of the Criminal Justice organization internally and in relation to the external variables exercising organizational influence. Analyze policies and practices of agencies involved in the operations of the Criminal Justice process from the detection of crime, arrest of suspects, through prosecution, adjudication, sentencing and imprisonment. Relationships and interagency coordination required administratively throughout this procedure. Three lecture hours per week. CRJ major requirement.
Prerequisite: CRJ101.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 221: Mediation

The criminal justice technique of mediation will be developed theoretically and through case study methods. Mediation involves an independent third party who acts as facilitator in the resolution of a dispute in lieu of formal judicial intervention. The third party hears both sides of the problem and helps the disputants reach a satisfactory decision about the issue at hand. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for CRJ majors, Administration concentration. Elective for Peace Studies minor. Free Elective.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 222: Legal Anthropology: Adjudicating Conflict

Primary emphasis will be on ways adversarial disputes are settled within a variety of cultures. More formal settlement procedures, cultural reactions to offenses, and examples of deviance will be included. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for CRJ majors, Administration concentration. Elective for Peace Studies minor. Free Elective.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 230: Victimology

Interest in criminal victimization has increased dramatically over the last twenty years. There has been a great deal of research on victimization, legislation supporting victims, and victim programs and services. This course will explore the prevalence and etiology of victimization, types of victimization, the response of the criminal justice system, the response of victims', victims' programs and services, the Victim Rights Movement and current and pending victims' rights legislation. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for CRJ majors, Administration concentration. Free Elective.
Prerequisite: CRJ101.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 240: Bias Crime

This course provides an overview of the issues associated with bias crime. This course focuses attention on legislative initiatives, data collection, police training and public awareness. This course also explores the role of private organizations such as the Anti-Defamation League and the Southern Poverty Law Center in tracking the activities of hate groups such as the Ku Klux Klan and Aryan Nation. Three lecture hours per week. Administration concentration elective.
Prerequisite: CRJ101.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 250: Introduction to Criminal Investigation Procedures

This course is a survey course of criminal investigation procedures that will cover crime scene analysis, interview and interrogation techniques, profiling of offenders and crime patterns. The legal and scientific considerations underlying each topic will be discussed. Three lecture hours per week. Administration concentration elective.
Prerequisite: CRJ101 or permission of the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 301: Community Corrections

This course examines community corrections which occur within the criminal justice system but outside of the traditional correctional institutions. The student will analyze the evolution, structure and function of various community correctional components such as diversion programs, halfway houses, and drug and alcohol treatment programs. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: CRJ101.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 303: Crime and the Elderly

This course will offer the student an opportunity to study the criminal victimization of elderly in the United States. The family as well as public and private social institutions will be analyzed for their contribution to or deterrence of the growth of elderly victimization. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for CRJ majors, Administration concentration. Free Elective.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 325: Juvenile Justice

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the origin, philosophy and objectives of the juvenile justice system. An extensive and systematic analysis of juvenile justice policies and practices will be undertaken, especially those reflecting the philosophical shift toward offender accountability and public safety. Topics include an examination of Supreme Court decisions and legislative reforms related to the treatment, prevention and control of juvenile delinquents. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 330: Police Studies: Analysis and Research

Police administration, organization and management will be studied in the context of current theory and research. Issues of police leadership, communication, professionalism, decision-making and job-related stress will be explored. Three lecture hours per week. CRJ major requirement.
Prerequisite: CRJ101.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 340: Community Issues in Criminal Justice

Discussion of the problems of crime as it confronts the American community and methods by which resolutions may occur. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for CRJ majors, Administration concentration. Free Elective.
Prerequisite: CRJ101.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 350: Introduction to Courts

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the major structures and functions of courts in the American criminal justice system. The course will analyze the formal and informal structure of the federal, state and local courts system. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for CRJ majors, minors, and Administration concentration.
Prerequisite: CRJ101.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 355: White-collar Crime

This course will move beyond criminology's micro-level analysis of crimes in the streets to a macro-level analysis of crimes in corporate suites. The course will provide students with a comprehensive introduction to three types of "white collar crime." (1) corporate crime; (2) occupational crime; and (3) political crime. Three lecture hours per week. Administration Elective for CRJ majors, Administration concentration. Free Elective.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 360: Racial Minorities, Crime, and Criminal Justice

This course examines racial minorities, crime and social policy in a flexible forum of discussions that evaluate criminal statistics and race; trends and issues in measuring racial involvement in crime; race and American laws; racial minorities and law enforcement; race and the criminal courts; capital punishment and race; race and the corrections system. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 362: Theories of Crime and Justice

This course provides an overview of the major theories of crime and justice and helps students developing writing skills. The causes, correlates and measures of crime will be examined, as presented in theories and empirically tested through relevant research. Topics include the evaluation of theories and their application to criminal justice policies and programs. Three lecture hours per week. CRJ Major Requirement.
Prerequisite: CRJ 101.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Communication-Level II

CRJ 365: Gender and the Criminal Justice System

This course will examine the roles and behaviors of females in offending, victimization, and the workplace within the criminal justice system and will also consider diverse genders and sexuality. Course content will include the important history of women. Theoretical perspectives and research studies will be presented for criminality and victimization. The criminal justice system's official response to the needs and rights of females and people from diverse genders will be explored. Discussion will include policy implications and legal reforms. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for CRJ majors. Free Elective.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 380: Criminal Profiling

This course provides an overview of the current use of criminal profiling within the criminal justice system. Students will examine the history, structure and function of the four main types of criminal profiling: Crime Scene Analysis, Investigative Psychology, Geographic Analysis, and Behavioral Evidence Analysis. Various facets of the profiling process will be examined, such as the psychology of the offender, crime scene analysis, and the interpretation of evidence. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisite: CRJ 250 or permission of the Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 400: Criminal Justice Research I: Research Methods

This course will outline the research process and will utilize criminological studies to illustrate research methods. The following will be examined: problem formulation involving topic selection, literature review, definition and operationalization of concepts, and construction of hypotheses; design of research strategy including examination of descriptive, exploratory, experimental, cross-sectional and longitudinal studies; data collection techniques; data management and analysis; and presentation of findings. The integration and application of theory, research and policy will be discussed. This is a W-III writing intensive course. Three lecture hours per week. CRJ major requirement.
Prerequisites: W-I course and CRJ362.

Credits: 3.00

This course fulfills these general education curriculum requirements: Written Commun-Level III

CRJ 401: Criminal Justice Research Ii: Statistics

This is part two of a two-semester sequence integrating research methods and statistical analysis. Basic descriptive statistics, including measures of association and regression analysis will be taught. The course will introduce the student to reading and interpreting computer output, allowing them to analyze criminal justice data sets and draw general conclusions. Three lecture hours per week. CRJ major requirement.
Prerequisites: CRJ400 and Basic College Math Competency Requirement.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 402: Drugs and Crime

This upper-level seminar will examine the effect that drugs, both legal and illegal, have on the criminal justice system. Critical analysis and in-class discussion will be the format used to address issues such as the effect of the "war on drugs", the decriminalization debate, the relationship between drugs and violence, and the impact of drugs on individual users. Elective for Criminal Justice majors, Administration concentration. Free Elective.
Prerequisite: CRJ101.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 410: Comparative Criminal Justice

This course introduces students to the issues involved in comparative criminal justice. It will focus on the historical development of the laws and structure of various criminal justice systems throughout the world. Topics will include the influence of social, economic and political factors on criminal justice systems. Three lecture hours per week. CRJ major requirement.
Prerequisite: CRJ101.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 431: Technology and the Criminal Justice System

This seminar analyzes the influence of technological innovations on the functioning of criminal justice institutions, including the police, courts and corrections. Students will learn how the accelerated pace of technological change has affected both day-to-day operations and long-range programming priorities. The legal and ethical implications of these changes will also be addressed. Three lecture hours per week. CRJ Technology and Research Concentration requirement. CRJ Administration concentration elective.
Prerequisites: CRJ101

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 432: Criminal Law

The historical background of criminal law: its nature, purpose and development from common law to contemporary statutory and case law will be studied. The general principles of criminal liability will be presented: the act or omission, the mens rea, criminal responsibility, defense and justification. Laws pertaining to offenses against persons, property, public order and public morals will be examined. Discussion will include commercial, white-collar and organized crime. Three lecture hours per week. CRJ major requirement.
Prerequisite: CRJ101.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 435: Ethics in Criminal Justice Decision Making

An analysis of the moral and philosophical dilemmas which criminal justice policymaking and field personnel at all levels face while carrying out their daily responsibilities. The impact of moral concerns on practical decision-making is a primary focus, and specific topics are drawn from all phases and agencies of criminal justice processing, including law enforcement, the courts and corrections. Attention also focuses on the tradeoffs involved in resolving moral dilemmas as they impact the criminal justice system, along with an overview of how future developments in the field will affect both evolving conceptions of morality and optimal problem resolution strategies. CRJ Policy and Research concentration requirement. Administration concentration elective.
Prerequisite: CRJ 101.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 520: Internship in Criminal Justice

The internship affords students the opportunity to translate theory into practice, to apply and gain knowledge, and to experience directly the operations and functions of a Criminal Justice agency. This fieldwork may assist students in clarifying their career goals and exploring future employment opportunities. Interns must be available eight to ten hours per week for fieldwork and regular meetings with the internship faculty advisor. Open only to Criminal Justice Seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for CRJ530 (Directed Study in Criminal Justice) or CRJ540 (Criminal Justice Capstone).
Prerequisites: An overall GPA of at least 2.0 and a GPA of at least 2.0 in Criminal Justice.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 530: Directed Study in Criminal Justice

An individualized program involving study in depth of some aspect of Criminal Justice management or research under direction of the Criminal Justice faculty. Research paper required. Students must present a proposal for approval and subsequently defend the research paper at a meeting with the Criminal Justice Committee. Open only to Criminal Justice Seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for CRJ520 (Internship in Criminal Justice) or CRJ540 (Criminal Justice Capstone).
Prerequisites: An overall GPA of 2.0 and a GPA of at least 2.0 in Criminal Justice.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 540: Criminal Justice Capstone

This course provides students with an opportunity to reflect broadly upon their education at Salem State University and apply course materials to organizations in the criminal justice system. Specific learning acquired through academic experiences will be applied to the various agencies in criminal justice. The course emphasizes the connection between theory and research to current practices in the field of criminal justice. One and a half lecture hours and 6 hours of field work per week. Open only to CJ Seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for CRJ520 or CRJ530.
Prerequisites: An overall GPA of 2.0 and a GPA of 2.0 in Criminal Justice.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 580: Special Topics in Criminal Justice

This course will provide students with the opportunity to address some of the latest issues in criminal justice. Course topics will vary from semester to semester but some examples include homeland security, cybercrime, restorative justice and gangs. Three lecture hours per week. The course may be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing, 12 credits of Criminal Justice, or permission of Department Chairperson.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 703: Race, Class and Ethnicity and Criminal Justice

This course examines racial, ethnic and socioeconomic factors and explores the possibility that the criminal justice system may be influenced by such factors. The course concentrates on comparative and historical analyses of the relationship between these factors and the criminal justice system and seeks to identify and critically analyze the work of scholars who have developed theories related to this issue.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 704: Juvenile Delinquency and Justice

This course will focus attention on the origin, evolution and current administration of the juvenile justice system. The major theories of delinquency will be introduced and assessed. In addition, special attention will be devoted to gang violence, drug dealing in schools, and the increasing problems associated with anti-social offenses committed by youths.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 705: Women and Criminal Justice

This course examines the role of women in the criminal justice system, as victims, offenders, inmates and professionals. This course analyzes: (1) variations and patterns in female criminality; (2) the rehabilitation of female offenders; (3) the context and meaning of female victimization; and (4) gender and criminal justice professions. In addition, special attention is devoted to criminal justice theories and their relevance to women.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 706: White Collar Crime

This course examines the nature, causes and costs of white collar and corporate crime. A study of corporate crime and criminals is pursued examining the similarities to and differences from other offenders. The major theoretical explanations of white collar and corporate crime are presented. Special attention is given to the impact of social, economic and political forces on the control of white collar and corporate crime.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 707: Intimate Violence

This course will examine violence among intimates, including partner abuse, marital rape, child abuse, child neglect and elder abuse. The major foci will be on domestic violence and child abuse. This course will highlight theories of intimate violence, such as intergenerational transmission and social exchange.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 708: Victimology

This course examines the role of victims in the criminal justice process. A study of the theories of victimization and the nature and extent of victimization is pursued. Special attention is devoted to the treatment of victims by the criminal justice system, the emergence of the victim rights movement and victim services.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 709: Prisons and Jails

A study of current policies and issues that affect modern confinement practices at the federal, state and local levels in the U.S. The emphasis is on rationale, classification, control, programs, treatment, supervision and outcomes. Analysis and examination of the effects of various confinement environments on federal and state prisoners are examined from sociological and psychological perspectives.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 710: Community Corrections

This course analyzes the movement with corrections to provide offenders with rehabilitative and reintegrative services outside of the traditional institutional settings. The historical, theoretical and philosophical rationale for the community-based approach will be critically examined, as well as a wide variety of functioning programs. Attention will also focus on how this movement has addressed special needs offenders, including juveniles, women, substance abusers and the mentally ill.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 711: Police Policy and Practice

Initially, this course will review the historical developments of police policy and police practice. It will examine the changes associated with policy and practice over the past several decades and will focus on how well those practices have serviced specific communities across the U.S. This evaluation will include ideological paradigm shifts between stated mandates versus actual experiences of various communities and specific groups.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 712: Criminal Profiling of Violent Offenders

This course will review the history of criminal profiling as well as the current strategies utilized in criminal profiling. Research on reliability, validity and ethical issues of profiling will be reviewed. There also will be an emphasis on application of currently utilized models in developing profiles through analysis of case studies. The course will extensively cover the three main areas of profiling: forensic analysis, victimology, and crime scene characteristics. Administration Concentration Elective

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 713: Drugs and Crime

This course reviews issues in alcohol misuse, licit and illicit drug use, and the criminal justice system. Topics range from contemporary drug issues to the history of drug use as well as policy approaches. Students will assess the role of drugs in American society, the psychological and physiological effects of abuse, past and current drug control policies, and effective drug treatments. Administration and Criminology Concentration Elective

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 714: Topics in Criminal Justice

This course is an examination of specialized topics in Criminal Justice. The emphasis is on current issues and research and will include advanced readings and research. Topics may include: terrorism, comparative policing, gangs, sex offenders, globalization and crime, technology and crime, security administrations, homeland security, and crime mapping. May be repeated for creditfor a maximum of 3 courses. Multiple enrollments in a given semester permitted. Three lecture hours per week. Elective

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 800A: Theories of Crime

This course provides students with an understanding of the major theories of crime causation developed over the last three centuries. Special attention is devoted to issues related to the measurement of crime and what can be discerned from the available empirical data about the nature and extent of crime. In addition, explanations of various crime types such as violent and white-collar crime are highlighted and discussed.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 801: Criminal Justice Process & Administration

This course examines the processes involved in the administration of the criminal justice system, specifically policy, court and correctional agencies. Special attention will be focused on the external and internal factors that currently impact criminal justice administration and policy formulation.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 802: Criminal Law & the Judicial System

This course will include a discussion of criminal law, its historical development, function and purpose in American society. The essential elements of crime and principles of criminal liability will be studied. Various laws pertaining to offenses against persons, property, public order and the government will be reviewed. The course will also include discussion of the judicial system and its procedures. Judicial processing of criminal violators, and their due process rights, will be examined. Current legal and judicial issues will be selected and analyzed.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 810: Advanced Research Methods in Criminal Justice

This course will examine the logic and validity of research procedures in experimental, quasi-experimental, survey and field research. Students will develop critical abilities in analyzing social science research and will formulate research proposals using the techniques studied.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 812: Criminal Justice Statistical Analysis

This course introduces statistical concepts used for analyzing crime and evaluating crime policies. Students will survey statistical methods for establishing correlations, interpreting trends, conducting time series analysis, and prediction. The underlying concepts integral to these techniques are reviewed including probability and sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, effect size, and statistical power. An undergraduate course in statistics is required.

Credits: 3.00

CRJ 875: Directed Study

An independent research project supervised by a faculty member of the department of Criminal Justice.

Credits: 1.00 - 6.00

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