Rebecca C Hains

Rebecca C Hains

Professional Details

Title: Associate Professor
Office: CC-132
Phone: 978-542-7411
Email: rebecca.hains@salemstate.edu
Resume: Rebecca C Hains [PDF 301KB]

Fall & Winter Courses

Cat. # Term Course # Title
2530 04 COM205 Computer Production in Communications
2533 01 COM206 Mass Media and Society
2569 01 COM502 Communications Technology Practicum
3753 S1 COM206 Mass Media and Society
3968 02 COM500 Directed Study in Communications

Professional Biography

Ph.D., Mass Media and Communication, Temple University (2007)
Graduate Certificate, Women's Studies, Temple University (2007)
M.S., Mass Communication, Boston University (2000)
B.A., Communication Arts, Emmanuel College (1998)

Professional Interests

For more information:

RebeccaHains.com

Rebecca's Blog

Rebecca’s Academia.edu page

Rebecca’s Google Scholar page

Responsibilities

Media Studies Coordinator, Salem State University Communications Department

Co-Advisor to the Florence Luscomb Women's Center

Curriculum Committee

Selected Publications

Books

Hains, R. C. (2014). The princess problem: Guiding our girls through the princess-obsessed years. Sourcebooks.

Hains, R. C. (2012). Growing up with girl power: Girlhood on screen and in everyday lifeNew York: Peter Lang.

Anthology

Forman-Brunell, M., and Hains, R. C., Editors (forthcoming). Princess cultures: Mediating girls' imaginations and identities. New York: Peter Lang.

Refereed Journal Articles

Hains, R. C. (2014). The significance of chronology in commodity feminism: Audience interpretations of girl power music. Popular Music and Society, 37(1), 33-47.

Thiel-Stern, S., Mazzarella, S. R., and Hains, R. C. (2014). “We didn’t have adventures like that”: The lure of adventure stories and courageous females for girls growing up in the United States during the Mid-Twentieth Century. Journal of Communication Inquiry, 38(2), 131-148.

Mazzarella, S. M., Hains, R. C., and Thiel-Stern, S. (2013). Girlhoods in the golden age of U.S. radio: Music, shared popular culture, and memory. Journal of Radio and Audio Media, 20(1), 117-133.

Hains, R. C. (2012). An afternoon of productive play with problematic dolls: The importance of foregrounding children’s voices in research. Girlhood Studies, 5(1), 121-140.

Thiel-Stern, S., Hains, R. C., and Mazzarella, S. R. (2011). Growing up white and female during the American Great Depression: Popular communication, media, and memory. Women’s Studies in Communication, 24(2): 161-182.

Hains, R. C. (2009). Power feminism, mediated: Girl power and the commercial politics of changeWomen’s Studies in Communication, 32(1), 89-113.

Hains, R. C. (2008). The origins of the girl hero: Shirley Temple, child star and commodity. Girlhood Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal1(1), 60-80.

Hains, R. C. (2007). Inventing the teenage girl: The construction of female identity in Nickelodeon’s My Life as a Teenage RobotPopular Communication, 5(3), 191-213.

Hains, R. C. (2004). The problematics of reclaiming the girlish: The Powerpuff Girls and girl power. Femspec, 5(2), 1-39.

Book Chapters

Hains, R. C. (forthcoming). “If I were a Belle: Performers’ negotiations of feminism, gender, and race in princess culture.” In M. Forman-Brunell and R. C. Hains (Eds.)Princess cultures: Mediating Girls’ Identities and Imaginations. New York: Peter Lang.

Hains, R. C., Thiel-Stern, S., & Mazzarella, S. R. (2011). “We didn’t have any Hannah Montanas”: Girlhood, popular culture, and mass media in the 1940s and 1950s. In M. C. Kearney (Ed.) Mediated girlhoods: New explorations of girls’ media culture. New York: Peter Lang, 113-132.

Hains, R. C. (2008). Power(puff) feminism: The Powerpuff Girls as a site of strength and collective action in the third wave. In M. Meyers (Ed.) Women in popular culture: Representation and meaning. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press, 211-235.

Hains, R. C. (2007). Pretty Smart: Subversive intelligence in girl power cartoons. In S. A. Inness (Ed.), Geek chic: Smart women in popular culture. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 65-84.

Select Other Publications

Hains, R. C. -- click here for articles by the Christian Science Monitor

Hains, R. C. and Brown, R. E. (2014, August 13). Media's choice of photos creates a split-second biasSt. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Hains, R. C. (2013, December 1). A message to Lululemon Founder Chip Wilson: Stop Shaming Women's Bodies! ThinkCERCA.

Hains, R. C. (2013, December 1). “Am I Pretty or Ugly” Videos a Symptom of Toxic Media Culture. ThinkCERCA.

Selected Presentations

2014

Hains, R. C. (2013, April 2). "Girl culture, empowerment, and consumerism: From girl power to the Disney Princesses." Kids in Media Culture, Department of Media, Culture, and Communication, New York University, NY.

2013

Hains, R. C. (2013, April 2). "Nobody can be that pretty: How girls negotiated girl power cartoons." Presented at the Fortnightly Lecture Series of the School of Education, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA.

Hains, R. C. (2013, March 23). "Little princesses, big problems: Fighting the pretty princess takeover of girlhood." Presented at the Consuming Kids Summit of the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood, Boston, MA.

Hains, R. C. (2013, March 4). "Nobody can be that pretty: How girls negotiated girl power cartoons." Presented at the Seventh Annual Women's Leadership Conference, Salem State University, Salem, MA.

2012

Hains, R. C. (2012, August 10). “If I were a Belle: Performers’ negotiations of feminism, gender, and race in princess culture.” Poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the Association of Educators in Journalism and Mass Communication, Chicago, IL.

Mazzarella, S. M.; Hains, R. C.; and Thiel-Stern, S. (2012, August 9). “Girlhoods in the golden age of U.S. radio: Music, shared popular culture, and memory.” Paper presented in the Commission on the Status of Women interest group at the Annual Meeting of the Association of Educators in Journalism and Mass Communication, Chicago, IL.

2011 

Thiel-Stern, S.; Hains, R. C.; & Mazzarella, S. M. (2011, May 29). “Growing up white and female during the American Great Depression: Popular communication, media, and memory.” Paper presented to the Popular Communication and Feminist Scholarship divisions at the Annual Meeting of the International Communication Association, Boston, MA.

Avila-Saavedra, G.; Hains, R. C.; & Cook, J. P (2011, May 28). “Being a multicultural American girl: Popular communication, identity, and femininity in preadolecence.” Paper presented to the Popular Communication and Feminist Scholarship divisions at the Annual Meeting of the International Communication Association, Boston, MA.

2010

Hains, R. C., and Cook, J. P. (2010, August 4). “Girls between cultures: Media and multicultural identity negotiation in pre-adolescent girls.” Poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the Association of Educators in Journalism and Mass Communication, Denver, CO.

Hains, R.C., and Cook, J.P. (2010, May 30). Negotiating Hannah Montana: How girls with multicultural backgrounds negotiatepopular media in the U.S. Presentedat the Prix Jeunesse International (a festival promoting excellence inchildren’s television), Munich, Germany.

Hains, R.C. (2010, April 7). “Nobody can be that pretty": How girls negotiate beauty ideals in girlpower cartoons. Presented at the Eighth Annual Academic Colloquium and Publications Celebration, Salem State College, Salem, MA.

2009

Hains, R.C., Branscomb, E., Luna, M., and Aske, J. (2009, September 1). “Fostering interdisciplinary connections: A roundtable discussion.” Workshop presented at Opening Day, Salem State College, Salem, MA.

Hains, R.C. (2009, May 29). “Are supergirls super for girls? The negotiation of beauty ideals in girl power cartoons.” Presented at the bilingual conference on Jeunes, Media, et Sexualization: Youth, Media & Sexualization at the YWCA Montreal, with simultaneous translation into French. Montreal, Canada.

Hains, R.C. (2009, May 7). “Are supergirls super for girls? The negotiation of beauty ideals in girl power cartoons.” Presented as part of a lecture series at Marlboro College, Marlboro VT.

2008

Hains, R.C. (2008, November 21). Panelist on “Gender representation and its impact on kids: Are we concerned?” Presented at the Média-Jeunes Conference of the Alliance for Children and Television, Montreal, Canada.

Smirles, K.E., Hains, R.C., and Shanahan-Roberge, D. (2008, August 16). Content analysis of gender narratives in prime-time television advertisements. Poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Association, Boston, MA.

Hains, R.C. (2008, May 23). Power feminism, mediated: Girl power and the commercial politics of change. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the International Communication Association, Montreal, Canada.

Hains, R.C. (2008, January 29). Are supergirls super for girls? Paper presented at the Geena Davis Institute on Gender and Media: International Researchers Roundtable, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA.

2007

Hains, R.C. (2007, December 4). Are supergirls super for girls? Paper presented at the conference “Die Helden und Heldinnen der Kinder” (“The Heroes and Heroines of Children”), sponsored by the Internationales Zentralinstitut fur das Jugend- und Bildungsfernsehen (the International Central Institute of Youth and Educational Television), held at the Bavarian Broadcasting Corporation, Munich, Germany.

Hains, R.C. (2007, November). From orphans to supergirls: Girl heroes, yesterday and today. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Communication Association, Chicago, IL.

Hains, R.C. (2007, April). Totally Spies, totally commodified: The empowerment and consumption of girl heroes. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Eastern Communication Association, Providence, RI.

Hains, R.C., and Brown, R. (2007, April). Beyond infotainment: From South Park to citizenship in the age of pop politics. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Popular Culture Association, Boston, MA.

Personal Interests

SPECIAL CONFERENCES

2014

White House Council on Women and Girls: White House Research Conference on Girls (April 28, 2014)
Washington, DC

I was a selected to participate in an invitation-only conference with policy makers, leaders of girl-serving organizations, business leaders, and others to discuss improving public access to important research about girls’ lives and issues. Scholars and researchers across the US conduct and publish research on issues that affect girls’ lives – from girls and leadership, to girls’ success in STEM, to the portrayals of girls in the media. Too often, however, this research never makes its way into the hands of those who need it most.  Many individuals whose work directly impacts girls’ lives have neither the time nor the resources to access the latest research on girls. In an effort to bridge this gap, the White House Council on Women and Girls held its Research Conference on Girls, focused on finding ways to make research on girls more available and accessible to individuals in all sectors.

2013

Day of the Girl “Girls Speak Out” Conference: Innovating for Girls' Education. Sponsored by the Working Group on Girls (October 11, 2013)

United Nations, NY                                                        

I attended the Girls Speak Out conference at the United Nations, which was dedicated to global girls’ commitment to girls’ education and to improving their communities. The event’s goals included providing governments with concrete recommendations based on the global action of girls. During the afternoon-long conference, girl presenters from around the world told their stories of community change. They illuminated how the projects girls are working on affect not just girls, but entire communities.

The event was sponsored by the Working Group on Girls, an NGO Committee of the United Nations, which promotes the human rights of the girl child in all areas and stages of her life. This work is done through the inclusion and presence of girls in the United Nations system.