Rebecca C Hains

Rebecca C Hains

Professional Details

Title: Associate Professor
Office: CC-142
Phone: 978-542-7411
Email: rebecca.hains@salemstate.edu
Resume: Rebecca C Hains [PDF 226KB]

Spring Courses

Cat. # Term Course # Title
2456 01 COM206 Mass Media and Society
2488 01 COM502 Communications Technology Practicum
2495 01 COM507 Experiential Learning in Advertising
2496 02 COM507 Experiential Learning in Advertising
4140 S2 COM206 Mass Media and Society

Professional Biography

Ph.D., Mass Media and Communication, Temple University (2007)
Graduate Certificate, Women's Studies, Temple University (2007)
M.S., Mass Communication, Boston University (2000)
B.A., Communication Arts, Emmanuel College (1998)

Professional Interests

For more information:

Rebecca’s blog

Rebecca’s Academia.edu page

Rebecca’s Google Scholar page

Selected Publications

Books

Hains, R. C. (forthcoming). The princess problem: Guiding our girls through the princess-obsessed yearsSourcebooks.

Hains, R. C. (2012). Growing up with girl power: Girlhood on screen and in everyday lifeNew York: Peter Lang.

Anthology

Forman-Brunell, M., and Hains, R. C., Editors (forthcoming). Princess cultures: Mediating girls' imaginations and identities. New York: Peter Lang.

Refereed Journal Articles

Thiel-Stern, S., Mazzarella, S. R., and Hains, R. C. (forthcoming). “We didn’t have adventures like that”: The lure of adventure stories and courageous females for girls growing up in the United States during the Mid-Twentieth Century. Journal of Communication Inquiry.

Hains, R. C. (2013). The significance of chronology in commodity feminism: Audience interpretations of girl power musicPopular Music and Society, 1-15.

Mazzarella, S. M., Hains, R. C., and Thiel-Stern, S. (2013). Girlhoods in the golden age of U.S. radio: Music, shared popular culture, and memory. Journal of Radio and Audio Media, 20(1), 117-133.

Hains, R. C. (2012). An afternoon of productive play with problematic dolls: The importance of foregrounding children’s voices in research. Girlhood Studies, 5(1), 121-140.

Thiel-Stern, S., Hains, R. C., and Mazzarella, S. R. (2011). Growing up white and female during the American Great Depression: Popular communication, media, and memory. Women’s Studies in Communication, 24(2): 161-182.

Hains, R. C. (2009). Power feminism, mediated: Girl power and the commercial politics of changeWomen’s Studies in Communication, 32(1), 89-113.

Hains, R. C. (2008). The origins of the girl hero: Shirley Temple, child star and commodity. Girlhood Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal1(1), 60-80.

Hains, R. C. (2007). Inventing the teenage girl: The construction of female identity in Nickelodeon’s My Life as a Teenage RobotPopular Communication, 5(3), 191-213.

Hains, R. C. (2004). The problematics of reclaiming the girlish: The Powerpuff Girls and girl power. Femspec, 5(2), 1-39.

Book Chapters

Hains, R. C. (forthcoming). “If I were a Belle: Performers’ negotiations of feminism, gender, and race in princess culture.” In M. Forman-Brunell and R. C. Hains (Eds.)Princess cultures: Mediating Girls’ Identities and Imaginations. New York: Peter Lang.

Hains, R. C., Thiel-Stern, S., & Mazzarella, S. R. (2011). “We didn’t have any Hannah Montanas”: Girlhood, popular culture, and mass media in the 1940s and 1950s. In M. C. Kearney (Ed.) Mediated girlhoods: New explorations of girls’ media culture. New York: Peter Lang, 113-132.

Hains, R. C. (2008). Power(puff) feminism: The Powerpuff Girls as a site of strength and collective action in the third wave. In M. Meyers (Ed.) Women in popular culture: Representation and meaning. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press, 211-235.

Hains, R. C. (2007). Pretty Smart: Subversive intelligence in girl power cartoons. In S. A. Inness (Ed.), Geek chic: Smart women in popular culture. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 65-84.

Other Publications

Hains, R.C. (2008). Are super girls super for girls? Televizion, 21(E), 10-15. Published by the International Central Institute of Youth and Educational Television, Munich, Germany.

Hains, R.C. (2007, September). Superheroes for the little ones: A conversation with Josh Selig [creator of Nick Jr.’s The Wonder Pets!]. Televizion special issue: TV for TV Beginners. Published by the International Central Institute of Youth and Educational Television, Munich, Germany, pp. 56-57.

Hains, R.C. (2007, Spring). [Review of “I Blame the Patriarchy” (blog)]. Bitch: Feminist Response to Pop Culture, pp. 68-69.

Selected Presentations

Hains, R.C., and Cook, J.P. (2010, May 30). Negotiating Hannah Montana: How girls with multicultural backgrounds negotiatepopular media in the U.S. Presentedat the Prix Jeunesse International (a festival promoting excellence inchildren’s television), Munich, Germany.

Hains, R.C. (2010, April 7). “Nobody can be that pretty": How girls negotiate beauty ideals in girlpower cartoons. Presented at the Eighth Annual Academic Colloquium and Publications Celebration, Salem State College, Salem, MA.

Hains, R.C. (2008, May 23). Power feminism, mediated: Girl power and the commercial politics of change. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the International Communication Association, Montreal, Canada.

Hains, R.C. (2007, December 4). Are supergirls super for girls? Paper presented at the conference “Die Helden und Heldinnen der Kinder” (“The Heroes and Heroines of Children”), sponsored by the Internationales Zentralinstitut fur das Jugend- und Bildungsfernsehen (the International Central Institute of Youth and Educational Television), held at the Bavarian Broadcasting Corporation, Munich, Germany.

Hains, R.C. (2007, November). From orphans to supergirls: Girl heroes, yesterday and today. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Communication Association, Chicago, IL.

Hains, R.C. (2007, April). Totally Spies, totally commodified: The empowerment and consumption of girl heroes. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Eastern Communication Association, Providence, RI.

Hains, R.C., and Brown, R. (2007, April). Beyond infotainment: From South Park to citizenship in the age of pop politics. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Popular Culture Association, Boston, MA.

Hains, R.C. (2006, June). Conducting qualitative research with children: Interdisciplinary and feminist perspectives for media scholars. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the International Communication Association annual conference, Dresden, Germany. June 2006.

Hains, R.C. (2005, June). Feminism in the new Tomorrowlands. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Media Ecology Association, New York, NY.

Hains, R.C. (2005, June). The limits of the female superhero: Good girls and bad girls in Disney's Kim Possible. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Orlando, FL.

Hains, R.C. (2005, June). Panel chair and participant on “Envisioning girls’ studies: Recent trends and future agendas.” Presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Women’s Studies Association, Orlando, FL.

Hains, R.C. (2005, May). Reinscribing compulsory heterosexuality in Buffy: Active audiences, fan fiction, and the subversion of televised narratives. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the International Communication Association, New York, NY.

Hains, R.C. (2004, June). Looks can be deceiving: Buffy the Vampire Slayer and third wave feminism in the postmodern era. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Women’s Studies Association, Milwaukee, WI.

Hains, R.C. (2004, April). The American news media and the archetypal figures of September 11. Paper presented at the Joint Annual Meeting of the Popular Culture Association and the American Culture Association, San Antonio, TX.